Female Online Browsing Habits

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Part
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Sports Trends for Women: UK

As of 2018, the number of women participating in sports at least twice per month in the UK was roughly 17.6 million, approximately 260,000 more than in 2016. This indicates a growing trend of women's involvement in sports who are interested in not only promoting their health, but also their interpersonal skills and confidence. As of May 2017, 17% of women participated in sporting activities such as team sports, racket sports, and water sports. Below are three popular sports-related trends among women ages 30-55.

Netball

  • In the UK, netball sees the largest participation of women, and it is growing in popularity thanks to a win by the Vitality Roses at the 2018 Commonwealth Games.
  • As of 2019, 1.4 million women participate in netball on a weekly basis during the netball season.
  • The Netball World Cup and the Back to Netball Campaign/England Netball are two brands that have helped increase the popularity of netball among women.

Football

  • Women's football is another growing trend in the UK. The Football Association has seen a 15.9% increase in women's football teams, and almost 1.6 million women over the age of 16 play the sport.
  • 43% of women are interested in watching football.
  • The increasing interest and participation in football can be attributed to England winning the 2015 and 2019 Women's World Cup.
  • The Football Association is a brand at the forefront of this trend.

Cricket

  • Cricket is a very popular sport among women in the UK and has seen an increase in participation in the last few years as a result of England's 2017 win in the Women's World Cup.
  • The England and Wales Cricket Board, a brand at the forefront of this trend, is investing £20 million over the next two (2) years to "Inspire Generations" and increase participation in the sport.
Part
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Part
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Sports Trends for Women: Global

Three global sports-related trends that are popular among women aged 30 to 55 center on the demand for fashion-forward and women-focused sportswear, the interest in cycling, basketball, and women's sports, and the appreciation for brands that support female athletes.

Demand for Fashion-Forward and Women-Focused Sportswear

  • Women continue to seek sportswear or activewear that are designed specifically for them and are fashion-forward, comfortable, and functional all at the same time.
  • This is a trend that Russ Kahn, a senior vice president at sportswear brand Puma, Greg Portell, a lead partner at consulting firm A.T. Kearney, and Ayako Homma, a fashion consultant at market research firm Euromonitor International, all have observed.
  • According to Kahn, shrinking and 'pinking' men's sportswear, which was the usual strategy of sportswear brands in the past when developing products for women, is no longer enough.
  • Portell echoes the same sentiment, saying that as a result, sportswear brands are now employing more deliberate strategies, and are no longer treating women as an afterthought.
  • Homma says women differs from men in that they choose sportswear that offers both comfort and fashion.
  • Recognizing this trend early on seems to be what propelled high-end athleisure brand Lululemon to the top. Lululemon is now one of the top brands in women's activewear, thanks to its commitment to providing women with products that do not only perform well but are stylish as well. For people ages 18-29 and 30-55, Lululemon reportedly represents a lifestyle.
  • Another brand that is taking advantage of this trend is Athleta, a brand that recognizes women do not have the time to change multiple times a day to address sports/workout and fashion needs. In one article, it was mentioned that Athleta targets "Gen X and older millennial moms who buy clothes for their Athleta girls."

Interest in Cycling, Basketball, and Women's Sports

  • Women's interest in cycling, basketball, and women's sports is growing. One of the forces driving this trend is the fact that female fans of women's sports are finding women's sports competitive (48%), inspiring (41%), and progressive (33%).
  • The growing interest in cycling and basketball has been observed by Ida Petersson, buying director at designer fashion retailer Browns, while the growing interest in women's sports has been observed by measurement company Nielsen and audience insight provider GlobalWebIndex.
  • According to Petersson, Browns has seen the cycling genre grow in popularity among its global female audience. Petersson also notes that basketball is very popular among women in the United States.
  • Based on a global survey conducted by Nielsen, 49% of fans of women's sports are female, and the women's sports with the largest fan bases are football/soccer, mixed martial arts, extreme sports, and basketball.
  • GlobalWebIndex reports that of people watching women's sports leagues, 43% are women, and the majority are aged 25-54. Of people watching women's sports leagues, 30% are aged 25-34, 21% are aged 35-44, and 13% are aged 45-54.
  • Browns is one example of a brand that is at the forefront of this trend. To address the preferences of its global female audience, it recently expanded beyond gym wear by adding cycling, yoga, basketball, running, and football performancewear to its offerings.

Appreciation for Brands that Support Female Athletes

  • Female fans of women's sports leagues, most of whom belong to ages 25-54, appear to be supportive and appreciative of brands that support female athletes.
  • This was evident in the response of female fans to recent actions of P&G, one of the biggest advertisers in the world.
  • Female fans reportedly had a strongly positive response to the partnership between Secret, one of P&G's deodorant brands, and the U.S. Women's National Soccer Team.
  • Secret publicly supports and champions the team, and when the team won the World Cup title in July 2019, the brand made a donation of $529,000 to the U.S. Women's National Team Players Association to address the issue of pay equality.
  • According to Nicole Draznik of the global personal care communications unit of P&G, the strongly positive response of female fans to Secret's campaign is perhaps due to the fact that "there simply isn't as much attention paid to women's sports."

Research Strategy

In identifying the desired trends, we consulted articles and reports that cover topics such as women's participation in sports and sports communities, women's consumption of sports media, and women's preferences when it comes to sportswear, all the while keeping in mind that women aged 30-55 worldwide are of interest. We especially looked into what surveys say about the topic and what brands are doing in the space. We paid attention as well to information specific to millennials and Gen Xers because these generations make up most of the 30-55 age group. Millennials correspond to ages 23-38, while Gen Xers correspond to ages 39-54.
Part
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Part
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Women Online: Demographics

The typical profile of a woman in the UK who views any kind of content online is that of a college-educated, married woman between the ages of 16 and 44 who earns more than £40,001 per year and lives in an urban area of either the London or South East region of the UK.

Age

  • In 2018, 99.2% of women between the ages of 16 and 44 in the UK used the Internet. This is compared with 97.2% of women between the ages of 45 and 54, 92% of women between the ages of 55 and 64, 78.9% of women between the ages of 65 and 74, and 37.6% of women over the age of 75.
  • As such, the majority of women in the UK who are using the Internet are between the ages of 16 and 54, but the younger age group has slightly more penetration.
  • The Digital in the UK report found that of the combined advertising audiences of Facebook, Instagram, and Facebook Messenger, the highest percentage for women is in the 25-to-34-year-old bracket (13%). This is followed by the 35-to-44-year-old bracket at 9% and the 18-to-24-year-old and 45-to-54-year-old brackets, each at 8%.
  • This data suggests that women between the ages of 25 and 34 are the highest Internet users in the UK based on social media use.

Geographical Location

  • London and the South East region of the UK have the highest proportion of recent Internet users in the UK at 93% each.
  • The South West region comes in second at 92.3% penetration and East of England is third at 92%.
  • Northern Ireland has the lowest proportion of recent Internet users at 86.7%.
  • According to the 2019 Digital in the UK report, 84% of the UK is considered urban areas, which is suggests that most Internet users live in Urban areas. This can also be extended to assume that most female Internet users are also in urban areas.
  • In 2018, there were 4,459,151 females in London compared with 4,448,930 males, suggesting that the geographic location data accurately represents women in this region
  • In 2018, there were 4,633,294 females in the South East region compared with 4,500,331 males, suggesting that the geographic location data accurately represents women in this region.
  • In 2018, there were 2,844,821 females in the South West region compared with 2,754,914 males, suggesting that the geographic location data accurately represents women in this region.
  • In 2018, there were 3,145,694 females in the East of England region compared with 3,055,520 males, suggesting that the geographic location data accurately represents women in this region.

Income

  • In 2014, the latest year for which data is available, nearly 99% of Scottish households with annual incomes of £40,001 and more had Internet access.
  • Additionally, about 96% of Scottish households with annual incomes of between £30,001 and £40,000 had Internet access, followed by 93% of households with annual incomes between £25,001 and £30,000.
  • The income bracket with the lowest penetration of Internet access was the £6,000 to £10,000 per year band at 51%, followed by the £0 to £6,000 band at 60%.
  • Although this data is just for Scotland, the UK Office for National Statistics stated this data suggests that across the UK, "those on low incomes are less likely to have an internet connection in the home." Therefore, the data is likely similar in other UK regions.
  • Moreover, this data is not specific to women; however, in 2017, the most common household type in the UK (67%) comprised opposite sex married couples. In addition, 53.8% of the one-person households in the UK contain one woman. This information suggests that women are a part of the majority of households in the UK. Therefore, the data on income level and Internet access would apply to women in the UK.

Educational Level

  • In 2015, the last time the UK participated in the World Internet Project, 96% of people with a college degree or higher used the Internet and 94% of people currently attending college used the Internet.
  • Only 88% of high school graduates and 67% of people with only a middle school education used the Internet.
  • Although this data represents both males and females in the UK, it is assumed that the data would be similar to women only based on population numbers.

Marital Status

  • The last time the UK published data on the marital status of Internet users was in 2012. At that time, 49% of all Internet users were married, 38% were single, 8% were divorced, and 3% were either separated or widowed.
  • In examining other reports published by the UK Office for National Statistics, marital status does not appear to be a category that is still measured.

Research Strategy

To create a demographic profile of women in the UK who view any kind of content online, we began with official statistics kept by the UK Office of National Statistics website. Although there was nothing specific on women who view content online, we were able to find some information about women who use the Internet. We assumed that if women were using the Internet, they were viewing content and since the criterion was "any kind of content online," we used women who use the Internet as a proxy for women who view any kind of content online. Unfortunately, the only current statistic that is kept by the Office of National Statistics for female Internet users is age. The remaining statistics were for both men and women, and some were well beyond our typical 24-month restriction.

So, we changed our strategy a bit and began searching for unofficial statistics from research companies like Deloitte, PwC, We Are Social, and others. We found additional data on the age of women in the UK who use social media, so we included that data under the age category, but outside of the overall percentage of women in the UK who use the Internet or various social media platforms, there was no information on demographics specific to female Internet users in the UK.

Finally, we looked for Internet- and technology-related publications such as Wired, The Verge, CNET, and others, but again, we were only able to obtain the global breakdown of Internet users by gender. There was some basic data on what women do on the Internet as opposed to what men do and we found the gender breakdown of Internet shopping, but again, these data points were mostly unrelated to a demographic profile of women in the UK who use the Internet.

Therefore, we returned to the Office of National Statistics and was able to uncover geographic data for 2018 for both men and women in the UK. Since the population is nearly even in all regions of the UK, with women slightly edging out men, we assumed that the data for both men and women applied to each gender equally. Then, looking back in the archives of the Office of National Statistics even further, we found data from 2012 for marital status. This statistic was also for both male and female Internet users in the UK, but again, with the population split nearly even, we assumed that the data would apply equally to both men and women. Given that most households in the UK are comprised of married couples, we assumed that the 2012 data is likely still similar to current data. Note that to view any data on the Office of National Statistics, one needs to click on the Excel file links to download the files.

We still weren't able to find the educational level of Internet users in the UK on the Office of National Statistics website. Fortunately, we came across the World Internet Project Report for 2018. The UK was not a participant for that year's report, but we found that the UK did participate in the 2015 edition. This allowed us to find the penetration of Internet use segmented by educational level. Therefore, as this was the most recent data available for the country, we elected to use it. It does appear that the population of the UK has only become more educated since 2015, so we assumed that the penetration rate of Internet use remains very high for those who are attending or have graduated from college. However, it is likely that Internet use has increased at lower educational levels as well. Still, for the purposes of this report, we assumed that the majority of users overall have at least some college.
Part
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Part
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Top Websites

Netmums and Babycentre are top websites visited by women ages 30-55 in the U.K. Below is an overview of the findings.

Netmums

  • Netmums has a total of 2.624 million visitors from the United Kingdom (64% of 4.1 million). [see calculations below]
  • 91% of Netmums' audience demographic is female, out of which around 60% of women are in the age group of 30-55 years.
  • The number of female visitors ages 30-55 years is estimated to be 1.428 million. [see calculations below]
  • As per Similarweb, based on web traffic, Netmums is ranked as #1 among women's health websites in the U.K.
  • According to All You Can Read, Netmums is ranked #3 among UK's women's websites.

Babycentre


Relevant Insights

  • According to an All You Can Read survey, the top U.K. women's websites are Babycentre, Mumsnet, Netmums, Vogue U.K., Glamour, Cosmopolitan U.K., Marie Clarie U.K., Sofeminine, Stylist, Elle U.K., Instyle, Femalefirst, among others, but not all of these websites are specific to women ages 30-55 years.
  • The most visited websites for women are Bustle (unique visitors: 42.4 million), Jezebel (unique visitors: 17.4 million), Cosmopolitan (unique visitors: 14.1 million), Hello Giggles (unique visitors: 13 million), Your Tango (unique visitors: 10.3 million), Women's Health (unique visitors: 6.8 million).
  • The top U.K. women's health websites are Netmums, Babycentre, Women's Health, Mother and Baby, and Tommy's.
  • Facebook is the most popular social media platform in the U.K., with 59.57% market share and it is popular among individuals between the ages of 20 to 29 years, but details on its popularity specific to individuals between 30-55 years are not mentioned.
  • Vogue U.K. is popular among people with a median age of 38 years.
  • Glamour U.K. has 3.2 million unique users and 98% of the users are women. The average age of website visitors is 28 years which means it is popular among women approaching their 30s.

Research Strategy

First, we searched for surveys and reports on top websites to garner top websites visited by women ages 30-55 in the U.K. We reviewed websites such as Forbes, Kasasa, Pew Research, All You Can Read, Aelieve among others, hoping to find readily available lists on the subject matter. Through our search, we were able to find information on the top U.K. women's websites and the top women's websites, but no specific list of top websites visited by females in the age group 30-55 years in the UK was found.

Next, we analyzed the audience demographics of multiple websites listed as top U.K. women's websites and top women's websites with web analytics websites (such as Similarweb, Alexa, Thalamus, among others). We were only able to identify two websites (Netmums and Babycentre) that were identified as top websites and were predominantly visited by women ages 30-55 years in the U.K. For other websites, there was insufficient information on the audience demographics to consider them as the top websites visited by women ages 30-55 years.

Next, we searched for surveys, polls, research articles and reports listing the top websites female millennials (25-39 years) and female Generation X-ers (40-54 years) visit to triangulate if these are also top websites visited by women in the U.K. in the requested age group. We combined these two generations to sufficiently cover the age group between 30-55 years as no report or study classifies the ages 30-55 years in one bracket. Most of the information found was on the top millennial websites and did not provide any supporting statistics. The information was also not specific to females from these two generational groups.

Even after expanding the scope to global websites for all the above-mentioned strategies, the information found was on women in general or on the U.S. (where segmentation was according to age and gender) and provided no insights that could help further triangulate the top websites. We also explored sources older than the standard 24 months, but this also did not yield any results.

Calculations

Netmums Female Visitors Ages 30-55 Years
Total website traffic = 4.1 million visitors
U.K. visitors = 64% = 0.64 x 4.1 million = 2.624 million visitors
Female U.K. visitors = 91% = 0.91 x 2.624 million = 2.38 million visitors
Female U.K. visitors between 30-55 years =60% = 0.60 x 2.38 million = 1.43 million visitors

Babycentre Female Visitors Ages 30-55 Years
Total website traffic = 3.83 million visitors
U.K. visitors = 38.59% = 0.3859 x 3.83 million = 1.478 million visitors
Female U.K. visitors = 91% = 0.91 x 1.478 million = 1.344 million visitors
Female U.K. visitors between 30-55 years =60% = 0.60 x 1.344 million = 0.8 million visitors



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Part
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Top Content Viewed

The top video content viewed online by individuals between the ages of 35-55 include videos involving past events or people, top news and pop culture, and DIY content. Meanwhile, the top video content viewed by women include entrepreneurial and empowering videos.

Top Content Viewed By 30-55 Year Olds

1) Past Event Or People

Description

  • Google/Ipsos Connect Survey participants between the ages of 35–54 that go online every month like to watch YouTube videos centered on past events or people.
  • Other nostalgic videos that are watched by the segment include music, entertainment, pop culture, and commercials from the past.

Criteria

  • Around 75% of Gen Xers, or those aged 35-54, watch what is referred to as nostalgia videos on YouTube of events or people from the past.


2) Top News And Pop Culture

Description

  • They view videos concerning news and pop culture to help them keep up with their kids' world, to connect with their kids, and to stay on top of what is occurring in the world.

Criteria

  • As per the Google/Ipsos Connect Survey, 68% respondents aged 35–54 view video content to keep up with events that are currently happening.


3) Learn How To Do Something Or DIY

Description Of The Content:

  • Five of the most watched DIY videos are for home repair and improvement, cooking, technology use and repair, arts and crafts, and beauty and personal care.

Criteria

  • As per the Google/Ipsos Connect Survey, 73% respondents aged 35–54 watch videos on YouTube for purposes related to DIY, which assists them in learning ways to performing certain activities for themselves.
  • According to Nielsen, 70% of Millennials watch YouTube "to learn how to do something new."


Top Content Viewed By Women

1) Entrepreneurial Content

Description

  • In 2017, video content watched by women on YouTube on business services, business news, and small business more than tripled, in terms of watch time, over 2016.
  • Women are also using online videos to gain expertise and to develop in their careers.

Criteria

  • In 2017, it was reported that the time females allocated towards observing entrepreneurial video content on YouTube more than doubled over 2016.

2) Learning How To Do Something Or DIY

Description

  • Women use online platforms to learn about exercises and recipes, and they are more inclined to search for a "how-to" video than one centered on the topic of beauty.
  • Women also might want to learn how to construct a home, and moms of all ages may be searching for gaming advice as opposed to parenting tips.

Criteria

  • More than two-thirds (67%) of mothers in the millennial age cohort claimed to "have continued to pursue their personal passions since having their child(ren), which is significantly higher than Gen X moms."
  • Compared to men, women are about 50% more likely to frequently view videos on YouTube teaching them how to do something.


3) Empowering Videos

Description

  • Currently, women are observing more videos containing an empowering messaging.
  • There was notable growth in the quantity of empowering advertisements on the YouTube Ads Leaderboard between 2014 and 2015, which serves as a monthly tracker for the platforms' most-viewed ads.

Criteria

  • "The International Women’s Day YouTube Ads Leaderboard" lists empowering video ads that are the most-viewed among women around the world, and females have dedicated over 1 million hours of their time viewing the advertisements.


Research Strategy:

Our research began by scouring through surveys and media reports, as they are likely to present studies involving specific ages and genders. For this, we examined sources such as Pew Research, Think with Google, and Ofcom UK. Though the UK report highlighted the media usage, platforms, and attitude of consumers in the UK, it did not discuss the content viewed by the women aged 30-55. We also tried to locate case studies from HBR, Wharton, among others that could help us identify relevant data. However, no such case study was available that highlighted the most popular types of content viewed online by women aged 30-55.

Next, we tried to triangulate the information by looking for age-specific content and the share of women watching those videos. For this, we visited Think with Google, Retail Dive, Pew Research, Social Blade, and Statista. The idea here was to check for the most popular types of content viewed online by individuals aged 30-55 and the share of women that watch these. Though we were able to identify prevalent content observed by this group, there was no detailed composition available addressing the percentage of women viewing them.

We also tried to find the most popular types of content viewed online by women and the share of viewership for those aged 30-55. The idea here was to check what women watch/view online and then try to identify them with the specified age group viewing/using online content. Even though we discovered what women watch online through a Think With Google report, it did not address the required age segment.

Finally, we explored sources older than the standard 24-month time frame to see if any study covered this topic at an earlier date. However, this also did not yield any significant results. Nonetheless, some older sources provided useful and relevant information, which we included in our brief.

Due to the lack of available data, we were unable to present the most popular types of content viewed online by women aged 30-55. The primary reason for the absence of information is that most studies/surveys focus on gender (all ages) or the specified age group (men and women).

Defining The Age Segment:

We applied Kasasa's definition of Generation X and Millennials as no report or study classified the ages of 30-55 in one bracket. We used a combination of these two generations to highlight the overall age group. Gen X was born between 1965-1979 and are currently between 40-54 years old. Meanwhile, Gen Y, or Millennials, were born between 1980 -1994. They are currently between 25-39 years old.

In a Google/Ipsos Connect Survey, Gen X respondents totaled 1,004, and the participants were between the ages of 35–54. The individuals involved in this study go online at least once a month.
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Part
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Top Content Shared

After an exhaustive search through credible sources, it appears that information around the type of content that is most frequently shared online by women aged 30-55 in the UK is unavailable in the public domain.

Content Shared in the UK

  • More than two-thirds (71%) of adults in the UK aged 25-34 are more prone than internet users in general to claim that they ever provide their opinions online.
  • Less than half (46%) of UK internet users express that opinions, whether controversial or not, should be shared online utilizing individual’s actual names.
  • In 2017, 4% of internet users in the UK shared content that was disruptive or offensive to explain issues to others compared to 8% in 2016.
  • Around 39% of internet users in the UK aged 25-34 always share their opinions utilizing their actual name compared to 35% of users aged between 35-44 and 33% of those aged 45-54.
  • About 81% of the social media/messaging site users in the UK feel assured in understanding ways to manage which individuals have access to the videos and photos they share, while 28% are pleased to share their personal videos and photos on social network platforms.
  • On Facebook, the most engaging form of content individuals can share is video, according to Avocado Social.
  • The average UK user shares only one post in a 30-day period.


Content Shared by Women

  • Less than one-third (26%) of women in the UK have created and shared a video online.
  • Only 4% of women in the UK have crafted their own music and shared it online.
  • An estimated 10.8 million women with LinkedIn profiles in the UK are likely to share their network’s posts. [calculated below]
  • Female users on Facebook typically "share more personal issues (e.g., family matters, relationships)."
  • Facebook also reported that women are not engrossed enough with conceptual subjects to share them.


Content Shared by Millennial Women

  • On social media, about 65% millennials women are most likely to share personal photos and videos, funny things (60%), news stories (32%), product or service recommendation (26%), and educational information or resources (22%).
  • Millennial women also post tips via Pinterest (17%), Facebook (13%), and video (11%).
  • Millennial women share tips and tricks for food via Pinterest (24%), Facebook (22%), and videos (13%).
  • At least 22% of millennial women have shared home tips and tricks on Pinterest, 18% on Facebook, and 13% via videos.
  • Millennials are more prone than Gen X and Boomers to share data with other individuals through online channels.


Research Strategy:

Our research began by scouring through surveys and media reports, which tend to present studies around specific ages and genders. For this, we examined relevant sources like Pew Research, Think with Google, Ofcom UK, European Audiovisual Observatory, We Are Social UK, among others. While the Ofcom UK report highlighted the media usage, platforms, and attitude of consumers in the UK, it did not address the content shared by women aged 30-55. We also discovered the content millennial women share the most from Insights in Marketing, but there was no reference to Generation X. We also tried to locate case studies from HBR, Wharton, among others that could help us with this topic, but we could not locate a study providing relevant data.

Next, we tried to triangulate the information by looking for age-specific content and the share of women sharing it. For this, we consulted Think with Google, Avocado Social, Retail Dive, Pew Research, Social Blade, and Statista. The idea here was to check for the most popular types of content shared online by people aged 30-55 and the share of women that responded to such surveys. Though we were able to identify popular content shared by women, there was no detailed composition available highlighting their age.

We later tried to find the most popular types of content shared online by women and the age breakdown among them. The idea here was to see what women share online and then try to link them with the specified age group. However, we only found information on what women (overall) share, as well as internet users in general, through reports from Social Media Today and Ofcom UK. The percentage of women from each age group sharing online content in each category could differ.

Additionally, we examined sources older than the standard 24-month time frame to see if any study covered this topic at an earlier date. We visited sources such as Social Media Today for this information. Nevertheless, this report did not highlight the most popular types of content shared online by women aged 30-55. However, some older sources provided useful insights on what content women (overall) share.

Due to the lack of available information, we were unable to determine the most popular types of content shared online by women aged 30-55. The reason for this is that the focus of most studies/reports is on sharing and the percentage or frequency of sharing rather than the type of content. Moreover, the studies/reports concentrated on gender patterns instead of the age segments.

Defining The Age Segment For Triangulation:

Members of Gen X were born between the years 1965 and 1979 and are aged 40-54 today. Gen Y (Millennials) were born between the years 1980 and 1994 and are aged 25-39 today. We applied Kasasa's definition of Generation X and Millennials as no report or study classified the ages of 30-55 in one bracket, and mostly because the studies conducted are bifurcated generation wise as opposed to age.

Calculations:

  • There are around 27 million LinkedIn profiles in the UK (60% male, 40% female).
  • Hence, the quantity of LinkedIn profiles in the UK that belong to women equals the number of profiles multiplied by the share of profiles by females. Hence, 27 million*40% = 10.8 million.
  • Therefore, 10.8 million women with LinkedIn profiles are likely to share their network’s posts.
Sources
Sources