Emergency Preparedness Market

Part
01
of three
Part
01

Emergency Preparedness Key Players

Key players in the emergency preparedness market are Honeywell International Inc., Siemens AG, Motorola Solutions, Inc., Lockheed Martin, Rockwell Collins, Inc., Frequentis, Intergraph Corporation, ESRI, MetricStream, and Intermedix Corporation. The companies listed are either headquartered in the US or operate via a subsidiary in the US. We have compiled the list as well as revenue information and description in the attached spreadsheet.
To select the key players, we looked at a market report by Market Research Future that identified the key players in the market based on revenue. Then we conducted additional research to ensure that the players listed are based in the US and to identify the latest revenue of the key players identified.

The key players identified all have their headquarters in the US except Siemens AG and Frequentix. Siemens AG operates in the US through its subsidiary, Siemens USA, and has several offices and production facilities across the USA. Siemens USA headquarter is in New York. Frequentis is headquartered in Austria but operates in the US through its subsidiary, Frequentis USA, Inc., located in Colombia, Maryland. We have compiled our findings and sources in the attached spreadsheet.
To wrap up, we have identified and listed the key players in the emergency preparedness market in the attached spreadsheet as requested.

Part
02
of three
Part
02

Emergency Preparedness Market Size

While no preexisting statistics for the emergency preparedness market exist, we were able to triangulate a ballpark estimate based on available information. The size of the emergency preparedness market in the US for 2017 was in the region of $4.94 billion. Breakdown of the market by the categories of water storage and filtration, tools and equipment, transportation, and shelter was not available however one estimate for emergency food supplies was located, of $400 million. Through our research, we were able to identify growth in the US emergency preparedness market, with an increase in revenue experienced by suppliers of emergency preparedness products following the most recent election and when international disputes hit the headlines, such as between the US and North Korea.

Below you'll find an outline of our research methodology to better understand why information you've requested is publicly unavailable, the underlying calculation for our estimate and limitations of the data used, as well additional helpful findings.

METHODOLOGY

Our search for market data on the US emergency preparedness market included market research reports, industry websites and trusted media articles. Based on the examples of market players provided, we took this to be the retail market selling to US individual consumers rather than any corporate or government spending on preparation for natural disaster or other emergency situation. Although there were many media reports on the growing number of Americans making purchases to prepare them in an emergency or apocalypse-type situation, very little information on revenue generated by this market was available, and no market research report focused on this sector has been published online. This is likely due to the fact that the market players are private companies and therefore not obliged to publish revenue figures, along with the emergency preparedness market being fairly new and therefore not yet studied or researched in depth. There are numerous websites dedicated to providing information to individuals looking to prepare themselves for an emergency situation, but these tend to provide opinion-based articles with limited reliable hard data. We were able to find useful insights in our review of media articles, and one survey was located that provides the basis for our estimate.

FINDINGS

Based on available data, we have estimated the size of the emergency preparedness market in the US in 2017 as around $4.94 billion. This triangulation uses information from a survey conducted October 2017 by market research firm Pureprofile of 2,000 Americans, the only research on the topic that was located. This survey focused on “doomsday preppers”, which is analogous to those who are preparing for an emergency situation. The survey found that over 1 in 4 “have purchased survival gear on the back of recent political events or natural circumstances”, or over 68 million Americans. Of those who were preparing for an emergency, “36.35% spent up to $400 on survival kits in the past 12 months”.

Unfortunately, the published results do not provide any further breakdown of amounts spent, except by breaking out various demographic characteristics of buyers. Finder.com, which commissioned and published the research, does not define what a survival kit contains, but having reviewed the types of emergency supplies offered by the example retailers it is likely that they include long shelf-life food, water storage and filtration devices, and tools and equipment. It is unclear whether transportation and shelter specifically for emergency situations are included. Because the $400 is a maximum amount, with no indication of how this spending of up to $400 is distributed, we have taken a simple midpoint of $200 as the typical spend. Although there is no evidence from the survey that this is the average spend, based on prices quoted for emergency supplies, such $19.99 for food supplies designed to last only 72 hours from Wise Company, this figure does not seem to be overstated or unreasonable. Due to lacking available information, this triangulation is intended to provide only a rough, ballpark estimate.

36.35% x 68,000,000 Americans = 24,718,000 Americans purchased supplies for survival kits in 2017

24,718,000 x $200 = $4.94 billion spent on survival kit supplies in 2017

OTHER HELPFUL FINDINGS

The Pureprofile research did not provide any breakdown by category of item, using only an all-inclusive “survival kit” term. Bloomberg recently published an article which centered on the CEO of Wise Company, which reported that “only 2 percent of Americans have bought into survival foods”, a figure which is a lot lower than the 25% using survival kit supplies based on the Pureprofile survey. This suggests there is still ample growth in the survival food market, in order for those preparing for a potential emergency to acquire adequate nutritional supplies, as The New Yorker reported that 40% of Americans “believed that stocking up on supplies or building a bomb shelter was a wiser investment than a 401(k)”.

Although a figure for the emergency food market revenue was not determined, the revenue of Wise Company was reported as around $75 million, and their CEO estimated that the survival food sales market was $400 million.

In 2017, Business Insider reported on the growth in sales of companies that sell emergency preparation supplies, with both My Patriot Supply and Doomsday Prep experiencing a surge in orders following the election. And according to the New York Times, when the US President made comments about North Korea last year, this triggered a spike in sales at Emergency Essentials suggesting that the market is very sensitive to sociopolitical factors.

Although the Pureprofile research reported on Americans who had spent up to $400 on emergency survival supplies, it appears from media articles that there is a subsection of individuals spending significantly more than this. The New York Post reported on an individual in Nevada who claimed he had “spent between $150,000 and $200,000 stocking up on supplies, including two years’ worth of medical equipment, food and water”. Indeed, according to the New Yorker, tech millionaires and billionaires are amongst those spending money on emergency preparedness, fearing “a backlash against Silicon Valley, America’s second-highest concentration of wealth.” The article features a number of tech execs such as the current CEO and former CEO of Reddit, former Yahoo exec and former Facebook exec amongst others. As they detail the kind of purchases they make to be prepared for an emergency, including second homes in New Zealand and helicopters, it is clear that they exceed the $400 threshold set by the Pureprofile survey. However, as their number is small relative to the 68 million Americans who are currently served by the emergency preparedness market, it is likely not significant enough to skew the market size.

CONCLUSION

Although limited information exists regarding the total emergency preparedness market in the US, it appears that the market for emergency food, water storage and filtration, and tools and equipment is in the region of $4.94 billion based on triangulation of available data.
Part
03
of three
Part
03

Emergency Preparedness Thought Leadership

Leading experts in the U.S. emergency preparedness market include Dr. Chris Reynolds, Rachel Cleetus, and Cheryl Nelson. To compile the following list of U.S. emergency preparedness thought leaders, we extensively searched news articles, press releases, interviews, and social media. We took into account any natural or man-made event that can significantly disrupt an individual's life (e.g. natural disasters, riots, nuclear disasters) and defined leading experts as those having substantial media coverage and/or who regularly speaks at industry events.

U.S. EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS THOUGHT LEADERS

Information on each expert is provided below. Some leaders, while still appearing in or quoted in the media, have more information available about their career histories and biographies than others.



Dr. Reynolds has career experience in emergency management and military medicine. He is considered to be one of the leading experts in "emergency response and preparedness education." He has provided rescue and relief assistance to thousands of people affected by man-made and natural disasters. Reynolds has also led "medical combat evacuations" and serves as the Dean of Academic Outreach and Program Development for the American Public University System.



Rich Serino has over 40 years of experience in "federal, state, and local emergency management and emergency medical services." In 2009, he was appointed to the role of the Federal Emergency Management Agency's (FEMA) Deputy Administrator. While there he focused on enhancing FEMA programs and championed programs like "FEMA Corps, FEMA Stat, the FEMA Think Tank, a detailed budgetary process, and a Disaster Workforce Transformation." In the past, he also worked as the "Chief and Assistant Director of the Boston Public Health Commission" where he managed over 40 incidents that caused mass casualties. Serino has also operated as a "National Faculty Member of the Department of Homeland Security’s Domestic Preparedness Program since 1998."



Hodge is a law professor at Arizona State University's Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law. His research has focused on different areas of the law like ethics and human rights, public health, global health, and general health law. James Hodge is considered to be a nationally recognized expert on "emergency legal preparedness, obesity laws and policies, vaccination laws, and public health information privacy."



Sherstobitoff is a seismic specialist and engineer who works for Ausenoco, a global engineering firm. He has over 30 years of experience in seismic analysis and structural analysis as well as in the "design of both infrastructure and buildings." John Sherstobitoff is considered to be an expert on "design codes, especially regarding seismic and dynamic considerations." He is also the chair of the Standing Committee on Earthquake Design, NBCC.



Dr. Tom Inglesby "is the Director of the Center for Health Security of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health." He has gained global recognition in fields like "public health preparedness, pandemic and emerging infectious disease, and prevention of and response to biological threats." He operates as the chair for several scientific and health-related boards and has also co-authored or authored over 115 publications.



Culley is the president of a consulting firm, Emergency Management & Training Inc., he founded in 1998. The firm focuses on emergency preparedness and trains both organizations and governments around the world. Darryl Culley began his career as a firefighter and paramedic before becoming a "Paramedic Chief and then CEO of a healthcare facility." He has 35 years of experience in "emergency services, disaster preparedness, and healthcare administration experience." Culley also has certification in strategic intervention and is a keynote speaker.



John Clague is a professor at Simon Fraser University that teaches earth science and is also a quake expert. He has over 30 years of "experience in surficial/terrain mapping, Quaternary stratigraphic investigations, engineering and environmental interpretations of surficial geological information, and natural hazard studies." Clague has also given at least 200 lectures and is currently the Vice President of the International Union for Quaternary Research (INQUA).



Mwaungulu is a "senior program analyst of public health preparedness and law at the National Association of County and City Health Officials" (NACCHO). He manages the Public Health Law portfolio and the Preparedness and Ethics portfolios for NACCHO. He has also conducted research at the University of Pittsburgh.



Cleetus is a policy director at the Union of Concerned Scientists and is also an as an expert on climate policy. Rachel Cleetus operates on the state, regional, federal, and international levels while advocating for proper global warming policies that are effective. In the past, she has also worked as a "consultant for the World Wildlife Fund."



Redlener is "the director of the National Center for Emergency Preparedness at Columbia University in New York." Irwin Redlener is known for his expertise in "disaster preparedness and the public health ramifications of terrorism and large-scale catastrophic events." He has over 30 years of experience and is also the president and founder of the Children's Health Fund. Redlener has provided resources and medical care to underserved youth in both urban and rural areas across the United States.



John Gargett is the "deputy director of Whatcom County’s Division of Emergency Management." At the organization, he manages the daily "operations of the Whatcom County Sheriff’s Office Division of Emergency Management."



Moore is an emergency preparedness expert who is also known for being a serial entrepreneur. These business ventures have been in various industries like technology, international business, government contracting, manufacturing, and the intelligence/security sectors. His current focus is on a "series of projects to raise awareness of, and mitigate the risks associated with, our technology and energy-dependent supply chain network."



McKinney is recognized for her expertise in "public health preparedness and emergency response." Suzet McKinney is the CEO/Executive Director of the Illinois Medical District. In the past, she was the Sr. Advisor for Public Health and Preparedness at the Tauri Group. She is known for her knowledge of public health and her communication skills. McKinney also serves on several advisory boards and committees.



Redhawk is a preparedness expert who founded My Patriot Supply. This company provides "some of the highest quality emergency food, heirloom seeds, and emergency tools at reasonable prices." His other companies include Alexapure, Patriot Pantry, and Colonial Concepts.



Cheryl Nelson is a TV host, a broadcast meteorologist, and an expert in natural disaster preparedness. She has FEMA certification and focuses on promoting "family and pet preparedness through education, speaking engagements, social media, and TV programs nationwide."



Francis Edwards is considered to be a "disaster preparedness expert." She also works at San José State as a professor of political science. Edwards also is certified as an Emergency Manager and has more than 20 years of experience in California "as a director of emergency services."

CONCLUSION

After thoroughly reviewing press releases, news sites, and interviews, we have compiled a list of 16 leading experts in the U.S. emergency preparedness market. All of these leaders are either frequently quoted in the media and/or regular speakers at industry events.
Sources
Sources

From Part 03