Electrical Supply Customer Personas

Part
01
of two
Part
01

Electrical Supply Consumer Persona - Small Contractors

While there is no preexisting information to fully answer your question, I used the available data to pull together key findings: I was able to locate that electrical contractors are an average age of 57.3, with an average age of 58.7 in companies with 4 or fewer employees. 97% of electrical contractors are men, with 3% being women. The survey states that women are more likely to work for larger companies than smaller ones. Below, you'll find an outline of our research methodology to better understand why information you've requested is publicly unavailable, as well as a deep dive into our findings.

METHODOLOGY

I conducted an exhaustive search of government websites, market reports, white papers, trust media sites and the Bureau of Labor Statitsics. I also performed an X-ray source of City Electric Supply, Graybar, Rexel USA, Grainger and Sonepar, since they employ electrical contractors (small contractors). Unfortunately, I was unsuccessful in locating any information on their psychographics or demographics. Next, I searched for electrical contracting magazine and reports.

I was able to locate the "2016 Profile of the Electrical Contractor," the most recent publishing, found in EC Magazine. The report covered age demographics, percentage of male verse female, information regarding company size, income and recent education. Unfortunately, all other pyschographics and demographics per this particular group was not publicly available. There was also no differences published regarding small contractors working in rural areas vs. those in larger metropolitan areas. Below are a deep dive of my research findings. I hope you find this beneficial.

HELPFUL FINDINGS

According to the 2016 Profile of the Electrical Contractor, 57.3 is the average age of an electrical engineer in the United States, with an average age of 58.7 for those working companies with 4 or fewer employees. In 2014, the average age was 56.2, thus we can conclude the average electric contractor is getting older. 30% of electrical contractors were aged 35–54, 43% aged 55-64, with 67% of all electrical contractors being over 55.

97% of electrical contractors are men, with 3% being women. The survey states that women are less likely to work for smaller contracting companies than larger ones. Women were less likely to hold management positions.

Electrical contractors at smaller companies generated more revenue from maintenance/service/repair, rather than new construction. They were also more likely to be "owner, manager or master electricians"

Electrical contractors engaged in more "sustainability–related work types posted significant increases, including EV charging stations, smart or net metering, co–generation, energy storage, smart grid technology and microgrids" in 2016, in comparison to past years.

70% of all electrical contractors have taken some type of training in the last 12 months, with 78% reporting that they will be involved in training withing the next 12 months, with NEC changes being the post popular course.

According to the BLS, the average salary of an electrical contractor was $52,910 per year, which varied significantly by state; with Alaska and Illinois earning the highest incomes, at $72,030 and $70,430 respectively. Texas and Florida reported the lowest annual incomes at $43,350 and $39,880, respectively.

CONCLUSION

To wrap things, up I have provided you with the limited demographics/ psychographics that I was able to find in the 2016 Profile of the Electrical Contractor. Although this does not completely answer your question, I hope you still find this useful!
Part
02
of two
Part
02

Electrical Supply Consumer Persona - Large Contractors

While there is no preexisting information to fully answer your question, I used the available data to pull together key findings: I was able to locate that electrical contractors are an average age of 57.3, with an average age of 54.1 in companies with 10 or more employees. 97% of electrical contractors are men, with 3% being women. The survey states that women are more likely to work for larger companies than smaller ones. Below, you'll find an outline of our research methodology to better understand why information you've requested is publicly unavailable, as well as a deep dive into our findings.

METHODOLOGY

I conducted an exhaustive search of government websites, market reports, white papers, trust media sites and the Bureau of Labor Statitsics. I also performed an X-ray search of City Electric Supply, Graybar, Rexel USA, Grainger and Sonepar, since they employ electrical contractors (large contractors). Unfortunately, I was unsuccessful in locating any information on their psychographics or demographics. Next, I searched for electrical contracting magazine and reports.

I was able to locate the "2016 Profile of the Electrical Contractor," the most recent publishing, found in EC Magazine. The report covered age demographics, percentage of male verse female, information regarding company size, income and recent education. Unfortunately, all other pyschographics and demographics per this particular group were not publicly available. There was also no differences published regarding small contractors working in rural areas vs. those in larger metropolitan areas. Below are a deep dive of my research findings. I hope you find this beneficial.

HELPFUL FINDINGS

According to the "2016 Profile of the Electrical Contractor, 57.3 is the average age of an electrical engineer in the United States. The study concluded that as the company size increases, the contractors age decreases. In 2014, the average age was 56.2, thus we can conclude the average electrical contractor is getting older. 30% of electrical contractors were aged 35–54, 43% aged 55-64, with 67% of all electrical contractors being over 55.

Electrical contractors were more likely to be hired at larger firms, with 10 or more employees. 47% of large contractors reported an increase in their employee count, since 2014. We can thus conclude the ability to adapt to change and train new employees is more prevalent with contractors working at larger firms.

97% of electrical contractors are men, with 3% being women. The survey states that women are more likely to work for larger contractors than smaller ones. Women were less likely to hold management positions and were typically younger than men in the field.

Electrical contractors at larger companies generated more revenue from newer construction, rather than maintenance/service/repair. They were also more likely to be less experienced than those working at smaller companies.

Electrical contractors engaged in more "sustainability–related work types posted significant increases, including EV charging stations, smart or net metering, co–generation, energy storage, smart grid technology and microgrids" in 2016, in comparison to past years.

70% of all electrical contractors have taken some type of training in the last 12 months, with 78% reporting that they will be involved in training withing the next 12 months. NEC changes is the most popular course. Electrical contractors are usually excellent at mathematics and have great analytic reasoning skills.

According to the BLS, the average salary of an electrical contractor was $52,910 per year, which varied significantly by state; with Alaska and Illinois earning the highest incomes, at $72,030 and $70,430 respectively. Texas and Florida reported the lowest annual incomes at $43,350 and $39,880, respectively.

CONCLUSION

To wrap things, up I have provided you with the limited demographics/ psychographics that I was able to find in the 2016 Profile of the Electrical Contractor. Although this does not completely answer your question, I hope you still find this useful!
Sources
Sources