Eden Green, Part 2

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Part
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Institutions / Research: Job Titles

Research conducted into the job titles of individuals responsible for securing grant funds for agriculture, food growth, and land obtainment purposes concluded that three key titles for these roles are as follows: development manager, executive director, and commercial horticulture senior resource educator. The job title, executive director, was the most commonly found. Additional information on the duties of the researched roles can be found below.

Development Manager

  • As researched, this role oversees all fundraising and monetary contributions to Groundswell Center for Local Food and Farming, a sustainable food system organization, including, but not limited to, fundraising, grant writing, and managing of donors and donor relationships.

Executive Director

  • As researched, this role at Local Foods Coalition, a sustainable foods research and support organization, oversees all strategic planning, grant writing and management, project proposals, and management of staff.

Commercial Horticulture Senior Resource Educator

  • This job title was discovered through archives of grant award recipients from the USDA over the last two years. The grant lead listed for a grant matching the agricultural specifications laid out in this project held the job title of commercial horticulture senior resource educator.

Research Process

To access the necessary information to fulfill this research request a search was first conducted to find archives of recent grant awards provided by the government, specifically the USDA, in the past one to two years. This allowed for the ability to see the grant proposals that had been submitted for each award, the grant lead that submitted the proposal, and their corresponding job title.
Part
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Part
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Institutions / Research: Demographics

The demographics of individuals responsible for obtaining land grants from government organizations for the purposes of growing food and other food related agricultural activities are likely white females who have bachelor's or graduate degrees, who make around $60,000 per year and fall between the ages of 40 and 60. This assessment is based on an analysis of the collective demographics of individuals who have job roles and work in industries related to this type of grant writing. This includes grant writers/professionals, agriculture producers, development managers, executive directors, horticulturalists, university faculty, military personnel, NGO employees, and researchers. A deep dive of these findings has been presented below.

Demographics of Grant Writer/Professional Demographics

  • Education: Most grant writers have a bachelor's degree in the realm of English, journalism, communications or marketing. A 2009 survey of grant professionals published by the American Association of Grant Professionals found that 61% hold a graduate/professional degree, and 92% hold a bachelor's degree. The most common degrees are in business (91%), communications (12%), English (10%), international studies (7%), political science (7%), and history (5%).
  • Income: The median income of a grant writer is around $63,2801. The American Grant Professionals Association corroborates this finding, noting that the average salary of grand professionals surveyed is around $63,609.
  • Occupation: Grant professionals may hold any type of occupation, including "teachers, firefighters, authors, social workers, and military veterans."
  • Location: Most grant professionals work in urban areas.
  • Age, Sex, Race: According to a 2009 report published by the American Association of Grant Professional, most grant professionals are female (85%), ages 35-44 (29%), Caucasian (92%).

Demographics of Agriculture Producers

  • The average age of agriculture producers is 57.5, with a growing number under the age of 35.
  • 36% of agriculture producers are female, and 56% of farms have "at least one female decision-maker."
  • 11% of agriculture producers have served in the military.

Demographics of Development Manager s

  • Development managers earn a median income of $111,340 per year.
  • They typically have a bachelor's degree.
  • 60% of development managers are female.
  • 89% of development managers are white, while 6% are black, 2% are Asian, and 9% are Latino.
  • The majority of development managers are between the ages of 45 and 64. The median age is 45.5.

Demographics of Executive Director s

  • 92% of executive directors are male.
  • 88% of people with this job title are between the ages of 44 and 64.
  • Non-profit executives tend to be largely female (42%) and white (87%).

Demographics of Horticulturists

  • The average salary of horticulturists is around $67,504.
  • "Most horticulturists have a certificate or associate degree (51%). The most common areas of study are Environmental Science, and Biology." Meanwhile, 45% have a bachelor's degree.

Demographics of Military Employees

  • 82.% are male, and 70.7% are white (17% black).
  • 40.3% are aged 25 or younger (20.6% are 26-30 ; 15.5% are 31-35; 11% are 36-40; 12.6% are 41+).
  • 66.4% have a high school diploma or GED as their highest level of income (14.6% have a bachelor's degree).
  • 49.4% are married, 45% have never been married.

Demographics of University Employees

  • 41% of full-time faculty working in American universities are white men, while 35% are white women.
  • Overall 76% of college faculty are white.

Demographics of NGO Employees

  • Individuals on nonprofit boards tend to be white (78.6%) and over the age of 40 (83.1%).
  • 47% of NGO board members are women.

Demographics of Researchers

  • According to a survey of members of the Association of Research Libraries, 61% are female, 71% are white, and relatively equal numbers appear to live in urban vs. non-urban areas.

Research Strategy

This assessment is based on an analysis of the collective demographics of individuals who have job roles and work in industries related to this type of grant writing. This includes grant writers/professionals, agriculture producers, development managers, executive directors, horticulturalists, university faculty, military personnel, NGO employees, and researchers.

It should be noted here that the findings above include some insights from a 2009 survey of grant professionals, published by the American Association of Grant Professionals. Although this report was quite old, the findings were still included here for the following reasons: 1) it was among the most comprehensive and credible reports publicly available that reported directly on this information and, 2) the American Association of Grant Professionals reported some updated findings in 2017 which showed that much of the information reported in 2009 was the same (for example, both survey reported the same education level data and that most grant professionals work in urban areas, etc), however, the 2017 data did not have as detailed of information publicly available as the 2009 report, therefore the 2009 report was relied on for these details instead.
Part
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Part
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Municipalities: Job Titles

Job titles appear to vary significantly for those individuals within a municipality that are responsible for either growing or buying food for large groups of consumers.

Large School District

Director of Food Service

  • The School District of Monroe in Monroe, Wisconsin leverages the title "Direct of Food Service" for the leadership position that is responsible for food purchasing at the district's five schools.
  • Specifically, this role is responsible for food budgeting, food purchasing, menu development, pricing and vendor contracts, among other key activities, in support of delivering approximately 1,400 lunches and 800 breakfasts daily.

Food Service Director

  • Similarly, the Massachusetts school districts of Sharon Public Schools, Uxbridge Public Schools and Hopedale Public Schools all use the title of "Food Service Director" for the management role that oversees food purchasing.
  • Notably, this title is consistently used across smaller, two-school districts as well as larger public school districts with between 2,000 to 3,600 students.

Nutrition Services Director

  • In contrast, however, the Bethel School District in Eugene, Oregon leverages the title "Nutrition Services Director" when describing the position that oversees food sourcing.
  • Among this role's extensive list of responsibilities, the Nutrition Services Director is expected to purchase food to meet the needs of 5,500 students in 11 schools.


Large Food Banks

Vice-President — Food Acquisition

Vice President of Operations

  • Notably, the Mid-Ohio Foodbank in Grove City, Ohio uses the very different title of "Vice President of Operations" for the management position that oversees food procurement.
  • Specifically, this role is responsible for managing food sourcing, food warehousing, food transportation and inventory operations, among other key activities.

Director of Sourcing

  • Meanwhile, the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania leverages the title "Director of Sourcing" for its food procurement manager.
  • In particular, this position both procures and solicits over 22 million pounds of food every year.
Part
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Part
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Municipalities: Demographics

There are a variety of different job titles held by people with responsibility for purchasing food or meals for large groups of people within the United States. The use of these titles may vary by organization size, individual job accountabilities, salary and organizational culture. Provided below is some key demographic information for several roles connected to the requested profile. A comparison of the information sourced yields the conclusion that, a person employed in the purchase of food for large groups within a municipality is likely to be White, Male, holds at least a bachelor's degree, is aged over 40 and is earning between $44,000-$60,000 per year.

AGE


INCOME

  • The median weekly wage of a food service manager is $863 or approximately $44,876 per year.
  • The median weekly wage of a purchasing manager is $1539 or approximately $80,028 per year.
  • The average annual salary for a food service director is $53,711.

GENDER


RACE

  • 76.3% of food service managers are White, 19.8% Hispanic or Latino, 9.8% Black or African American and 9.6% Asian, including those of mixed race heritage.
  • 75.1% of purchasing managers are White, 10% Hispanic or Latino, 14.4% Black or African American and 5.9% Asian, including those of mixed race heritage.
  • 65.9% of food service directors are White, 13.5% Hispanic or Latino, 11.2% Black or African American and 6.1% Asian with 3.2% unknown.

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT

  • The U.S. Department of Agriculture sets professional standards for those employed in school food service management positions, which applies to new hires. For school districts providing for over 10,000 students, directors are required to hold at least a bachelor’s degree in any subject as well as a state-recognised certification in a food-related field such as food and nutrition, or food service management.
  • Those responsible for the food management programs of the largest districts are preferred to hold at least a master's level qualification.
  • 33.8% of food service directors hold at least a bachelor's degree with a further 20.7% having attained an associate degree.
  • 9.4% of food service directors hold a master's degree whilst only 0.3% hold a doctorate.
Part
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Part
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Food Exporters

The top five countries that are exporters of fresh foods in 2018 based on value are China, United States, Germany, Netherlands, and Japan. Below are the lists of the top five exporting countries per fresh food category and the amount they have exported in 2018.

Fresh Beef Exporters

Here are the top five countries that exported fresh beef in 2018 based on the value.
  • United States exported 14.8% of fresh beef, valued at $7.3 billion.
  • Australia exported 13.3% of fresh beef, valued at $6.5 billion.
  • Brazil exported 11.1% of fresh beef, valued at $5.5 billion.
  • India exported 6.9% of fresh beef, valued at $3.4 billion.
  • Netherlands exported 5.9% of fresh beef, valued at $2.9 billion.

Dairy Exporters

Here are the top five countries that exported dairy products in 2018 based on the value.

Fresh Poultry Exporters

Here are the top five countries that exported fresh chicken in 2018 based on the value.

Fresh Vegetable Exporters

Here are the top five countries that exported vegetables in 2018 based on the value.

Fresh Fruit Exporters

Here are the top five countries that exported fresh fruits in 2018 based on the value.

Top Fresh Foods Exporting Countries

Based on the figures above, here are the top five countries that exported fresh foods in 2018 based on the total value (beef + dairy + poultry + vegetables + fruits).


Research Strategy

Brazil exported 11.1% of the total fresh beef in 2018 which was valued at $5.5 billion. Apart from this, Brazil was not featured in any other top exporting countries for fresh food products in the world. The metric used to find the top countries exporting fresh foods was the value of income earned and share of the market size globally. Brazil only attained these criteria and metrics in the fresh beef category. To get the top 5 countries overall, we added the values earned per category of the countries included in the above lists as presented in the attached spreadsheet.


Part
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Part
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Exporters: Job Titles

While job titles vary among the top countries for fresh food exports, all the countries in question use the title director in some capacity (including executive director, deputy director, director-general, etc.). Other titles are more country-specific, such as secretary used in the United States.

Job Titles in the U.S.

Job Titles in China

Job Titles in Germany

  • In the Federal Ministry of Food and Agriculture (also known as the BMEL), the head of the organization is called the federal minister. The title director general is also used.

Job Titles in The Netherlands

Job Titles in Japan

Part
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Part
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Exporters: Demographics

We were unable to identify the demographic profile of people within governmental bodies that are responsible for the export of fresh foods due to the fact that people working on exports of fresh foods within the governmental bodies represent too small of a sample for the demographic profile study to be conducted. Instead, demographic studies are available for federal workforce employees, and results of such a study are outlined below.

Demographics for governmental bodies

  • According to the Federal Workforce study, which was mainly influenced by respondents from the Department of Agriculture, 57.3% of this government body's employees are male.
  • 0.5% don't have a high school education, 24% have a high school education, 32.6% have a Bachelor's Degree, and 20% have an advanced degree.
  • 15% live in the Washington D.C. metropolitan area. Additionally, 62.4% are white, 6% are Asian, 18.8% are black, 9% are Hispanic, 0.5% are native Hawaiian, and 1.7% are of more than one race.

Research methodology

We were unable to identify the demographic profile of people within governmental bodies that are responsible for the export of fresh foods. For this research, we first identified governmental bodies which are responsible for the export of fresh foods. Those include the FDA, the Department of Agriculture, and the Food Safety and Inspection Service. In order to find studies on employees which would allow us to understand which demographic characteristics are specific to government employees that are responsible for the export of fresh foods, we first looked into published studies on their employees by the FDA, the Department of Agriculture, and the Food Safety and Inspection Service. However, we were unable to find any studies that were published specifically for each body, and instead were able to only find a study that outlined the characteristics of federal employees in general. Secondly, we looked into academic research studies which focused on the division of labor within governmental bodies. For this, we searched large scientific databases such as Science Direct, JStor, and SagePub. However, none of the studies conducted focused on the US governmental bodies. Finally, we looked into Federal Workforce Statistics, a go-to body for all statistics regarding federal employee demographics, but we found no publications which provided more detail into government body demographics apart from the Federal Workforce Study, which was mainly influenced by respondents from the Department of Agriculture, but doesn't make a distinction between employees working on the export of fresh foods and those who are not working on the export of fresh foods.
Part
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Part
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Food Importers

Research reported that the United States, China, Germany, United Kingdom, and Netherlands were the top importers of fresh fruits in 2016. In 2018, United States, Brazil, Netherlands, Spain, and Indonesia were the top importers of vegetables, while Germany, the United Kingdom, France, Netherlands, and Mexico were the top fresh chicken importers. In 2018, the United States, Japan, Italy, Netherlands, and Germany were the top importers of fresh beef, while Germany, China, France, Netherlands, and Italy were the top importers of dairy products. All of these countries were the top based on the value of fresh food they imported.

Fresh Fruit Importers

Fresh Vegetable Importers

Here are the top five countries that imported the most vegetables in 2018 based on the value.
  • United States spent $67,319,565 on importing vegetables.
  • Brazil spent $46,247,211.35 on importing vegetables.
  • Netherlands spent $30,049,793.22 on importing vegetables.
  • Spain spent $26,914,039.43 on importing vegetables.
  • Indonesia spent $26,821,764 on importing vegetables.

Fresh Poultry Importers

  • Here are the top five countries that imported the most fresh chicken in 2018 based on the value.
  • Germany imported 15.2 percent of fresh chicken, valued at $902.8 million.
  • United Kingdom imported 14.2 percent of fresh chicken, valued at $845.2 million
  • France imported 11.7 percent of fresh chicken, valued at $698.2 million.
  • Netherlands imported 10.1 percent of fresh chicken, valued at $598.9 million.
  • Mexico imported 6.4 percent of fresh chicken, valued at $381.2 million.

Fresh Beef Importers

  • Here are the top five countries that imported the most fresh beef in 2018 based on the value.
  • United States imported 12.9 percent of fresh beef, valued at $3.1 billion.
  • Japan imported 8.9 percent of fresh beef, valued at $2.1 billion.
  • Italy imported 8.2 percent of fresh beef, valued at $2 billion.
  • Netherlands imported 8.1 percent of fresh beef, valued at $1.93 billion.
  • Germany imported 8 percent of fresh beef, valued at $1.91 billion.

Dairy Importers

  • Here are the top five countries that imported the most dairy products in 2018 based on the value.
  • Germany imported $7,602 million worth of dairy products.
  • China imported $5,294 million worth of dairy products.
  • France imported $4,464 million worth of dairy products.
  • Netherlands imported $4,382 million worth of dairy products.
  • Italy imported $4,177 million worth of dairy products.
Part
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Part
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Importers: Job Titles

In France, there is a director of Food, Agriculture, and Forestry in each of the 13 regions. In Germany, the BVL (Federal Office of Consumer Protection and Food Safety) has a director of Food Safety responsible for importing fresh food. In the UK, the Food Safety Agency has a director of Regulatory Compliance.

France

Germany

United Kingdom









Part
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Part
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Importers: Demographics

The following are 14 leadership profiles of individuals working for the Administrator of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), an agency of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). The profiles include professional and educational backgrounds, as well as location, estimated age, race, gender and income level, where available. Most of the individuals mentioned are white, male, highly educated with long careers and between the ages of 50 and 70.

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)

  • Gregory Ibach has been the Under Secretary of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Marketing and Regulatory Programs since 2017. His responsibilities include the overseeing of the health and care of animals and plants. In 1984, he received his BS in agriculture from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Ibach was the Nebraska Director of Agriculture between 2005 and 2017. He is approximately 60 years old, white, married with three children and lives on his mixed-use farm (residential and commercial) in Nebraska. According to his Ballotpedia page, "He is the owner and operator of a cow, calf, and grain operation".
  • Kevin Shea has been the Administrator of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) since 2013. Previously, he was the Associate Administrator, as well as the Head of the Policy and Program Development of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS). He started his long career at the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) in 1978. He has a law degree from the University of Baltimore School of Law and the University of Maryland, and lives in Crofton, Maryland. According to Bloomberg, Kevin Shea is a member of the Huiesler Honor Society, the Prince George's County Executive's Committee for the Future and the St. Mark's School Board. Kevin Shea is a six-time winner of the American Jurisprudence Awards for Excellence. He is president of the University Hills Civic Association and the Prince George's County Volunteer Fire and Rescue Association. Kevin Shea is approximately 65 years old and white.
  • Dr. Michael Watson has been the Associate Administrator of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) since 2018. His responsibilities include day-to-day operations and oversight of the activities of all APHIS programs. Previously, he was the Associate Deputy Administrator for the Agency’s Marketing and Regulatory Programs Business Services (MRPBS). He started his long career at the USDA in 1994, which included a position as a plant pathologist. Dr. Michael Watson holds a Bachelor’s degree in microbiology from the University of Maryland (1987) and a Doctorate in plant pathology from the University of California (1994). He is an African-American, estimated to be in his fifties., who lives in Riverdale, MD.
  • Dr. Mark Davidson has been the Associate Administrator of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) in Riverdale, Maryland since 2019. His responsibilities include day-to-day operations and overseeing the activities of every APHIS program area. He started his career with the USDA in 1996. Between 2013 and 2018 he was the Veterinary Services’ Associate Deputy Administrator and as such he provided planning, policy, oversight and implementation for Veterinary Services’ National Import Export Services activities. Dr. Mark Davidson has a DVM and Master’s Degree in veterinary pathology from Auburn University and a Bachelor’s degree in agriculture from Western Kentucky University. He is white and approximately 50 years old.
  • Dr. Jack Shere has been the Associate Administrator of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) since 2019. He is responsible for the day-to-day operations and the oversight of all activities and programs. He started his career at the USDA in 1990 as a field veterinary medical officer in Nebraska and Wisconsin. Dr. Jack Shere has a Bachelor of Science in Biology and Chemistry (1981), a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (1987) and a Master of Science in Education (1988) from Iowa State University, as well as a PhD in Poultry Science (2001) and a PhD in Microbiology (2001) from the University of Wisconsin. He is married with grown children, white and is estimated to be in his sixties.
  • Dr. Betty Goldentyer has been the Deputy Administrator of Animal Care within the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) since 2019. One of her main responsibilities is the enforcement of the Animal Welfare Act (AWA) and the Horse Protection Act (HPA). According to Federal Pay, her annual salary is estimate to be around $173,293. She received her degree from the Tufts University School of Veterinary Medicine in Medford, Massachusetts in 1983. She is estimated to be 63 years old, white, and lives in Washington, D.C.
  • Bernadette Juarez has been the Deputy Administrator of the Biotechnology Regulatory Services (BRS) within the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) since 2019. One of her main responsibilities is the safe import and transport of genetically engineered organisms. She started her career with the USDA in 2002 as a trial attorney. According to Federal Pay, her salary for the year 2018 was around $180,223. Bernadette Juarez received her Bachelor in Business Administration from the University of New Mexico in 1999 and her Juris Doctor from American University, Washington College of Law, in 2002. She is white, estimated to be in her forties, married with two children and lives in Silver Spring, Maryland.
  • Cheryle Blakely has been the Deputy Administrator of International Services (IS) within the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) since 2018. She started her career with the USDA in 2006 after she had been part of the U.S. Air Force and the Department of Defense for 16 years. According to Federal Pay, her income in 2018 has been around $182,451. Cheryle Blakely obtained her Bachelor’s Degree in occupational education from Eastern Illinois University-Carbondale and her Master of Science in public administration from Russell Sage College, Albany, New York. She is an African-American woman with two children and is estimated to be in her fifties.
  • Doug Nash has been the Deputy Administrator of the Marketing and Regulatory Programs Business Services (MRPBS) within the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) since 2019. He has started his career with the USDA in 1991 and was previously a software engineer and a United States Army Reserve officer. According to Federal Pay his base salary for 2018 was around $187,000. He received his Bachelor of Science degree in management information systems from George Mason University in Virginia. He is white, estimated to be in his sixties and lives in Washington, DC.
  • Osama El-Lissy has been the Deputy Administrator for the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services’ Plant Protection and Quarantine (PPQ) within the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) since 2013. He started his career with the USDA in 2000 and worked in pest control management the previous twelve years. According to Federal Pay, his base salary in 2018 was around $187,000. He received his master’s degree in international business administration from Georgetown University, a Master’s degree in public administration from American University, and a Bachelor of Science in agriculture production and entomology from Cairo University. Osama El-Lissy is estimated to be around 60 years old.
  • Dr. Burke Healey has been the Deputy Administrator and Chief Veterinary Officer of the Veterinary Services (VS) within the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) since 2019. He started his career with the USDA in 2004 as the Area Veterinarian in Charge for Oklahoma. According to Federal Pay, his base salary in 2018 was around $178,943. He has a veterinary degree from Oklahoma State University. Dr. Burke Healey is white, estimated to be in his fifties and lives in Washington, DC. He also runs his own farm in Colorado.
  • Janet Bucknall has been the Deputy Administrator of the Wildlife Services (WS) within the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) since 2018. According to Federal Pay, her base salary in 2018 was around $184,258. She has joined the USDA in 1987 and has a Master of Science degree in wildlife management from the University of Minnesota. Janet Bucknall is white, estimated to be in her sixties and lives in Riverdale, Maryland.
  • Bethany Jones is the Deputy Administrator for the Legislative and Public Affairs (LPA) within the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS). Her main responsibilities are media and communications. She started her career with the USDA in 1990 after she received a Bachelor of Arts degree in English from Randolph Macon Woman’s College in Lynchburg, Virginia. According to Federal Pay her base salary in 2018 was around $186,047. Bethany Jones is white, estimated to be in her fifties and lives in Washington, D.C.
  • Christine Zakarka is the Deputy Administrator for Policy and Program Development (PPD) within the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS). Her main responsibilities include planning and budgeting. According to Federal Pay her base salary in 2018 was around $187,000. She received her Bachelor’s in urban planning from Fordham University and her Master’s degree from University of Maryland University College. Christine Zakarka is white, estimated to be in her fifties and lives in Riverdale, Maryland.

Research Strategy

To conduct our research, we searched numerous websites, including FDA, USDA, ERS, APHIS, US Customs and Border Protection, American Veterinary Medical Association and Iowa State University websites, as well as Bloomberg, Ballotpedia, The Fence Post, United Egg, National AWA, Walking Horse Report, Federal Pay, Bovine Vet Online, Service to America Medals and Linkedin. You will find the full list of sources and quotes below.
Detailed information on who exactly handles fresh food imports was not available on the FDA, USDA and the APHIS respective websites. Even searches for imports produced no results containing names or job titles. We also attempted searches by food group, including meat, dairy, fruit and found only generic information about rules and regulations, but no names, except one instance in which the name of a researches came up.
Nonetheless, it the USDA and its APHIS agency do handle imports and more than one of the individuals listed above handles all day-to-day operations and all programs and we are confident that this is a good place to start.

Part
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Part
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Industrial Hemp: Job Titles

Three typical job titles held by someone responsible for either growing or buying industrial hemp at the senior level are master grower, director of cultivation, and VP of cultivation.

Master Grower

  • The "master grower" title appears to be the most popular senior level title for a person who grows hemp.
  • The job description entails "overseeing cannabis crops from planting to growing," "ensuring facilities are clean and pest-free," and "managing all aspects of cultivation, including budget and employees."
  • The Anthos Group is an example of a hemp company that has the position of master grower.

Director of Cultivation

VP of Cultivation

  • A third popular title for a senior level person who grows hemp is "VP of cultivation."
  • The VP of cultivation in a hemp or cannabis operation is responsible for "the documentation, task delegation, and monitoring of the Senior Director's of Cultivation and the cultivation facilities; maintaining yield standards, operating procedures and cleanliness."
  • CW Hemp is an example of a company that has the position of VP of cultivation.
Part
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Part
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Industrial Hemp: Demographics

As U.S. federal law changes in relation to the growing of hemp, it is very much a growth industry which has yet to receive detailed statistical analysis. Consequently, specific demographic information for those involved in the hemp industry is absent. However, after a review of data relating to the farming industry as a whole and industry news content, some conclusions can be made. Also, included below is an outline of the research strategies employed in an attempt to identify the requested data to better understand why it cannot be obtained and the related findings presented.

HEMP GROWING DEMOGRAPHICS

  • The typical grower of hemp in industrial quantities can be identified as being from rural states, with Montana, Colorado, Kentucky and Oregon having more acres of farmland cultivated for hemp in 2018 than anywhere else.
  • Hemp growers are also more likely to be younger than those engaged in traditional farming.
  • Hemp growers typically have previous experience in farming, often through a family owned farm.
  • Those involved in the growing, production and sale of industrial hemp or hemp products often hold a college level education, including up to masters level and often in an agricultural related field.
  • Previous farming experience of hemp growers can be wide-ranging, including growing crops such as wheat, corn and alfalfa, vegetable growing and cattle raising.
  • 55.8% of farms have female operators.
  • 96.6% of farms have white operators.
  • The average age of farmers and agricultural managers is 56.1 years old.

RESEARCH SUMMARY

A number of different steps were undertaken in order to pinpoint the detail required to complete the demographic profile requested. Industry research databases were scoured to identify those related to the hemp industry within the United States without success in finding any detailed analyses of the hemp growing or product manufacturing aspects of the industry. This was later widened to include a review of industry reports of hemp by-products including CBD oil, however these are of no intrinsic value to the client request and often focused on market size or end consumer demographics. Content from hemp advocacy campaign groups and advocates was reviewed but did not generate any useful findings to contribute to this submission and may have been considered not impartial sources of information.

News journal articles with recent hemp industry coverage within the last 24 months which included descriptions of varying individual hemp growing businesses/farms within the United States have been distilled into several key findings based on an assessment of demographic commonalities from the respective interviews contained within. In order to supplement these findings, it was considered that it may be beneficial to include some key demographic information for the agricultural industry as a whole, of which hemp is considered a constituent part which was sourced from government department statistics. Whilst no forensic analysis of the demographics within the hemp industry can be located at present, this is likely due to its emergence as growth industry and as the sector increases in value, number of businesses and number of employees, it is likely that industry research sources will investigate the hemp industry at a future date. Therefore, several actual hemp farmers are used in the analysis of the demographic profile.


Part
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Part
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Industrial Hemp Publications

Five of the top industry-focused publications and websites in the hemp industry based on social media followers are Cannabis Culture, the National Hemp Association, the Hemp Business Journal, Hemp Magazine, and Hemp Industry Daily.

Cannabis Culture

  • The website for Cannabis Culture can be found here.
  • Cannabis Culture is a top publication in the hemp industry based on the number of social media followers, which include 2.8 million Facebook followers and 303,700 Twitter followers. It also has the highest Alexa ranking of any hemp industry publication at 454,100.
  • Cannabis Culture is an industry publication about "marijuana and hemp around the world." It is not a print magazine, but its website is "recognized as one of the best sources for information due to our highest-standard journalism and news delivery about cannabis-related politics, activism, growing information, entertainment and more."

National Hemp Association

  • The website for the National Hemp Association can be found here.
  • The National Hemp Association is a top website for the hemp industry based on its 40,000 Facebook followers and 7,000 Twitter followers.
  • A main goal of the National Hemp Association is to work "collaboratively with industry, government officials, and the scientific community to create and implement industrial hemp standards, certifications and regulations."
  • It is also committed to "building a community of individuals, businesses and organizations to facilitate the growth of the industry."

Hemp Business Journal

  • The website for the Hemp Business Journal can be found here.
  • The Hemp Business Journal is a top publication in the hemp industry because it has over 4,000 followers on Facebook and over 1,000 followers on Twitter. It also has the second-highest Alexa ranking of any hemp industry publication at 836,100.
  • According to its website, the Hemp Business Journal is the "most trusted name in the hemp industry for business data, high-level analysis, market research and trends."
  • The journal brings industry leaders, investors, and political leaders "insider news on one of the fastest emerging markets in the United States."

Hemp Magazine

  • The website for Hemp Magazine can be found here.
  • Hemp Magazine is a top publication in the hemp industry based on its 3,900 Facebook followers. It has the third-highest Alexa ranking of any hemp industry publication at 1.1 million.
  • According to its website, Hemp Magazine is the "leading journalistic voice in the dynamic global hemp industry for both the hemp producer and consumer, from entrepreneurs to environmental activists to businesses working on the latest technological and scientific breakthroughs."
  • The magazine covers topics on hemp in the areas of "agricultural advancement, environmental sustainability, criminal justice, and the energy sector."

Hemp Industry Daily

  • The website for Hemp Industry Daily can be found here.
  • Hemp Industry Daily is considered a top publication in the hemp industry because of its 3,000 followers on Twitter and its over 1,000 followers on Facebook.
  • Hemp Industry Daily is the most trusted daily news source for the hemp industry and "brings all of the latest B2B industry news, trends and stories that are critical to the development and commercial applications of hemp in the United States and abroad."
  • Topics covered include "business opportunities, production and processing best practices, [and] the status of legal or policy changes," among others.
Sources
Sources

From Part 01
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  • "other work may include reviewing irrigation district infrastructure plans, writing grant applications, and collating irrigation diversion data."
  • "Prepare, review, or revise funding applications on behalf of FCA and its partners"
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  • "As Development Manager at Groundswell Center for Local Food & Farming, Natalie coordinates fundraising operations and communications, and supports grant-writing and food justice program development. "
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  • "Her skill set includes grant writing, government, visioning and strategic planning, non-profit management, finance, coalition building, economic development, education, fund raising, public speaking, and managing a budget."
From Part 02
From Part 04
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  • "The average salary for a Food Service Director is $53,711."
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  • "The new hiring requirements are mandated for new foodservice directors only"
  • "For the largest districts, directors will need at least a bachelor’s degree—in any subject—as well as a state-recognized certification in a food-related field such as food and nutrition or food service management."
  • "In the largest LEAs, director are preferred to have a master’s degree and at least one year management experience in a school nutrition program."
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  • "The national average salary for a Food Service Director in the United States is $59,572 per year or $29 per hour. Those in the bottom 10 percent make under $35,000 a year, and the top 10 percent make over $99,000. "
From Part 08
From Part 10
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  • "Gregory Ibach, Under Secretary - U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Marketing and Regulatory Programs - Mr. Greg Ibach was confirmed by the Senate and sworn in by the Secretary as USDA’s Under Secretary for Marketing and Regulatory Programs (MRP) on October 30, 2017. In his role as the Under Secretary, Mr. Ibach carries out the MRP mission area’s broad task of facilitating domestic and international marketing of U.S. agricultural products and ensuring the health and care of animals and plants. The MRP Mission Area is comprised of the Agricultural Marketing Service Agency and the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Agency. Following the Secretary’s realignment of a number of USDA offices in September 2017, the Grain Inspection, Packers, and Stockyards Administration and several programs from the Farm Service Agency are now housed under the Agricultural Marketing Service Agency. "
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  • "Mr. Ibach has been inducted into the Nebraska Hall of Agricultural Achievement and honored with the Service to Agriculture Recognition from the University of Nebraska- Lincoln, College of Agriculture Science and Natural Resources. He is also a former President of the National Association of State Departments of Agriculture. Mr. Ibach earned his Bachelor of Science in Agriculture from the University of Nebraska with majors in Animal Science and Agricultural Economics. He and his wife, Teresa, have three grown children and live on their farm and ranch in Sumner, Nebraska."
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  • "Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue today applauded the Senate’s confirmation of Greg Ibach, who was nominated by President Donald J. Trump to serve as Under Secretary for Marketing and Regulatory Programs at the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)."
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  • "APHIS plays a vital role in ensuring the free flow of agricultural trade by keeping U.S. agricultural industries free from pests and diseases and certifying that the millions of U.S. agricultural and food products shipped to markets abroad meet the importing countries' entry requirements. APHIS makes sure that all imported agricultural products shipped to the United States from abroad meet the Agency's entry requirements to exclude pests and diseases of agriculture."
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  • "This table shows the top-earning Federal employees of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service in 2018, based on OPM data (base salary + bonuses)."
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  • "In late July, Dr. Betty Goldentyer moved to Washington, D.C., from our Regional Office in Raleigh, North Carolina, to become AC's Associate Deputy Administrator working with Bernadette Juarez, our program Deputy Administrator. Dr. Goldentyer came to APHIS in 1988 after working in a small animal practice and then with a humane society in Chicago. Dr. Goldentyer started her APHIS career as an AC field inspector in Wisconsin, and then became a regional AC specialist and supervisor in Tampa Fl., before becoming the program's Regional Director in 2007. Since AC realigned in 2014 to create a modem and flexible organization structure, she has served as the Director of Animal Welfare Operations. Dr. Goldentyer is a graduate of Tufts University School of Veterinary Medicine."
From Part 12
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  • "Andy Rodosevich is cofounder of Hemp Depot, a Colorado Springs, Colorado, business that operates its own farms and is a distributor of CBD and hemp products. "
  • "Randy Wenger, a corn and wheat farmer whose 5,000 acre farm in Yuma County, Colorado, has been in the family since 1919, tried hemp farming for the first time last year. "I was looking for an alternative crop that could be profitable for me and wouldn't break the bank," he said."
  • "Blue Forest Farms used to grow hundreds of acres of kale, squash and pumpkins. But it has since switched its focus to a different cash crop: hemp. The farm, which is located in Erie, Colorado, has dedicated 150 acres to growing hemp so far -- and it's still planting. "We're now expanding it to 1,000 acres," said McKenzie Mann, Blue Forest's production manager. "
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  • "But farmers in Kentucky, reeling from low prices of other crops, view a change in the law as a potential bonanza. With federal approval, hemp holds more promise as a nationwide commodity than marijuana, which has been legalised for recreational use in a patchwork of states but is still outlawed by the US government. Mr McConnell said farms in 101 of Kentucky’s 120 counties — the nation’s leaders in hemp cultivation from the early 19th century to the first world war — were now growing the crop."
  • "The Coots farm, for example, cultivates corn, soyabeans, wheat and tobacco on 4,700 acres in southern Kentucky, and this year added seven acres of hemp, according to Bridget Coots, a family member. “We’re hoping that the hemp market could take the place of the tobacco income”, "
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  • "This year, Kentucky farmer Brent Cornett explained how he’d joined a hemp growers’ group called Atalo Holdings in Winchester, Kentucky, saying for the past three years he’s dedicated an increasing amount of acreage to hemp that previously was used to grow tobacco. “There’s been plenty of challenges with a new crop, but as of today, a mediocre hemp crop is yielding a better return than an excellent tobacco crop,”"
  • "“The hemp CBD industry is growing exponentially and presents a real opportunity for rural economic development, with tremendous enthusiasm from consumers,” says Atalo CEO William Hilliard. “Our intention is to attract the best and brightest, innovative farmers"
  • "In Northern California, farmer Ben Roberti, whose family runs a cattle ranch and grows alfalfa, has also diversified to include hemp crops into his rotations."
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  • "Rhonda Cornett serves as the Director for Grower Communications at Atalo and Chief Operating Officer for Hemp Knowbility. She is also a hemp farmer with several years of personal experience growing the crop. Rhonda comes to us as a former Grower Representative with Altria (Philip Morris USA) as well as being a high school agriculture teacher and FFA advisor for 11 years. She and her husband Brent, and children Jarrod and Miranda reside in London, KY. Rhonda received both her Masters degrees from Eastern KY University in Educational Administration and Educational Leadership. She earned her BS in Agriculture Education, Communication, and Leadership from the University of KY."
  • "Robby VanHook serves as Director of Grower Agronomy and Crop Logistics and also as an Agronomy Specialist at Hemp Knowbility. Robby has been a seedsman for many years working for FW Rickard and his own seed company. He is also a lifetime farmer having years of experience producing hemp, tobacco, forages, and cattle. He and his family reside on the family farm in Cynthiana, KY. Robby received his BS degree in Entomology from the University of KY."
  • "Brent Cornett serves as Director of Agronomic Research and Development at Atalo and an Agronomy Specialist for Hemp Knowbility. He is also a full time farmer growing hemp, produce, corn, cattle and hogs in London, KY. Brent has extensive knowledge in producing field and greenhouse hemp, processing, and managing hemp. Brent received his BS in Agriculture Education, Communication, and Leadership and a minor in Agriculture Economics from the University of KY. "
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  • "in 2018. Montana led the way at 22,000 acres, up from 542 acres in 2017. Colorado rose to 21,578 acres from 9,700 acres"
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  • "The percentage of young farmers may be rising, but as a group, farmers have aged over the past three decades. A 2011 study found that they’re six times as likely to be over age 65 than under age 35. Hemp is changing this trend, Bowman said. “We are watching these young farmers, beginning farmers, stemming the tide,” he said. “After watching the drain of our young people leaving agriculture, this is the first sign we’ve had in quite some time—hemp is bringing people back to farming."
  • "According to the 2017 Census of Agriculture, released in April, found a small but significant rise in the number of farmers younger than age 35. And the 2018 federal farm bill’s reversal of a decades-old hemp ban has led agricultural experts to predict that the percentage of young farmers will keep rising."