Duke Energy

Part
01
of nine
Part
01

Company Overview - Duke Energy

Duke Energy is a utility company with headquarters in North Carolina that currently offers energy services to over 7.4 million electric customers and more than 1.5 million natural gas customers.

History

  • Duke Energy was founded in 1990 by the Catawba Power Company. It was established by Dr. W. Gill Wylie, James Buchanan Duke, and William States Lee, and the idea behind the company was to establish an "integrated electric system of hydro-powered generating stations."
  • In 1904, Catawba Hydro Station in South Carolina started providing electricity to Victoria Cotton Mills, and since then, Duke Energy's hydroelectric fleet continued to expand in order to serve commercial textile mills as well as the region's expanding appetite for electricity.
  • In 1965, Duke Energy started its nuclear project, the Keowee-Toxaway Project. The nuclear plant was finished in seven years and even earned an Edison Award for the company.
  • The company's headquarters have historically been in Charlotte, North Carolina, and has stayed the same throughout the years.

Company growth

  • In 1997, Duke Power and PanEnergy merged to create Duke Energy.
  • By 2006, Duke Energy and Cinergy Corp. merged into one company and expanded its service area into Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana. Around this time, the newly created company served around 1.5 million electric customers and approximately 500,000 gas customers.
  • In 2006, Duke Energy's revenues were $10.61 billion.
  • In 2007, Duke Energy established its natural gas business to create Spectra Energy. This new company's operations now include natural gas transmission, storage, distribution, gathering, and processing.
  • In 2012, Duke Energy and Progress Energy merged their companies in order to expand Duke Energy's services to Florida. This formed the biggest electric utility in the United States.
  • In 2013, Duke Energy's revenues were $17.3 billion.
  • By 2016, Duke Energy acquired Piedmont Natural Gas in order to further expand natural gas services and cover the Carolinas and Tennessee.
  • Currently, Duke Energy serves over 7.4 million electric customers and more than 1.5 million natural gas customers.
  • Duke Energy Revenues grew from $22.7 billion in 2016 to $24.5 billion in 2018, which shows a CAGR of 3.8%. During the same period, EUI saw its revenues increase from $21.4 billion to $22.2 billion, at a CAGR of 1.9%.

Geographical reach and locations

  • Duke Energy currently offers energy services to around 7.4 million customers in the Carolinas, Florida, Ohio, Kentucky, and Indiana.
  • It also offers retail natural gas services to over 1.5 million customers in the Carolinas, Ohio, Kentucky, and Tennessee.
  • The company has one coal-fired plant in Crystal River, FL, seven coal-fired plants in North Carolina (Allen Steam Station in Gaston County, Asheville Plant in Arden, Belews Creek Steam Station in Stokes County, Marshall Steam Station in Catawba County, Mayo Plant in Roxboro, Rogers Energy Complex (Cliffside Steam Station) in Cleveland and Rutherford counties, Roxboro Steam Plant in Semora), and five coal-fired plants in the Midwest (Cayuga Station in Vermillion County, IN; East Bend Station in Boone County, KY; Edwardsport Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) in Knox County, IN; Gallagher Station in Floyd County, IN; Gibson Station in Gibson County, IN).
  • There are six nuclear plants in North Carolina and South Carolina: Brunswick Nuclear Plant in Brunswick County, Catawba Nuclear Station in York County, Harris Nuclear Plant in Wake County, McGuire Nuclear Station in Mecklenburg County, Oconee Nuclear Station in Seneca, Robinson Nuclear Plant in Darlington County.
  • There are twenty-five hydro stations in North Carolina and South Carolina, and one hydroelectric station in Florence, IN.
  • The company has thirteen gas-fired stations are located throughout North Carolina and South Carolina, 12 in Florida, and 6 in the Midwest.
  • There are seven solar stations in North Carolina, four in Florida, and three in the Midwest.

Agency of record

  • Duke Energy does not use any creative agency for its ad campaigns. Instead, it has an in-house marketing team that has been winning awards for its work.
  • In August 2018, Duke Energy launched a marketing campaign called "The Future is Now" which features a series of videos about how to best make use of energy in a sustainable way.
  • In the last 24 months, there have been no other marketing campaigns launched by Duke Energy.

Research methodology

As stated above, we found no proof of Duke Energy launching any other marketing campaigns except for "The Future is Now". In order to make sure there were no further marketing campaigns launched in the last 24 months, we checked the press release archive on Duke Energy's website which showed no press releases pointing out any other marketing campaigns launched. Furthermore, we checked industry websites such as PR Newswire and Adweek which also do not showcase any Duke Energy press releases or ad campaign announcements. Finally, we looked into the company's social media channels including Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube and found no additional campaigns to be posted on the company's profiles.
Part
02
of nine
Part
02

Duke Energy - C-Suite

Lynn J. Good, Melissa H. Anderson, Douglas F Esamann, Kodwo Ghartey-Tagoe, Dhiaa M. Jamil, Julie S. Janson, Brian Savoy, Harry K. Sideris, Steven K. Young, Selim Bingol, Melody Birmingham-Byrd, Keith G. Butler, David B. Fountain, T. Preston Gillespie, Dwight L. Jacobs, V. Nelson Peeler, and Regis T. Repko are the C-level executives at Duke Energy.

C-Suite at Duke Energy

1. Lynn J. Good (Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer)

  • LinkedIn Profile: https://www.linkedin.com/in/lynn-good-831b4a112/
  • Role at Duke Energy: She is the Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer at Duke Energy, which is America’s largest electric power company. Under her term, the company has intensified its focus on serving its customers and communities while she leads the way to a safe, secure and responsible energy future. She served as the company's Chief Financial Officer before becoming the CEO in 2013 and led the company’s commercial energy businesses during its initial development of renewable energy projects.

2. Melissa H. Anderson (Executive Vice President and Chief Human Resources Officer)

  • LinkedIn Profile: https://www.linkedin.com/in/melissa-anderson-053ab512/
  • Role at Duke Energy: She leads the HR, Real Estate and Administrative Services for a $24B energy company. She serves as the EVP and Chief Human Resource Officer at Duke Energy who is responsible for HR policy and strategy, talent management and diversity, employee and labor relations, total rewards strategies and programs, and delivery of business partner services. She joined Duke Energy in January 2015 from Domtar, a Canada-based manufacturer of paper and personal care products. She served as a Senior Vice President of Human Resources and corporate steward of talent for approximately 10,000 Domtar employees worldwide from 2010 to 2015.

3. Douglas F Esamann (Executive Vice President, Energy Solutions and President, Midwest/Florida Regions and Natural Gas Business)

  • LinkedIn Profile: https://www.linkedin.com/in/douglas-esamann-52b62b8/
  • Role at Duke Energy: He is responsible for corporate and regulatory strategy, emerging technology and the company's regulated and commercial renewable energy operations. Before, he served as president of Duke Energy Indiana, the state's largest electric utility from November 2010 until June 2015.

4. Kodwo Ghartey-Tagoe (Executive Vice President and Chief Legal Officer)

  • LinkedIn Profile: https://www.linkedin.com/in/kodwo-ghartey-tagoe-81723932/
  • Roles at Duke Energy: He serves as the Executive Vice President and Chief Legal Officer for Duke Energy. Ghartey-Tagoe is the primary legal adviser to Duke Energy's board of directors and senior management. He joined the company in 2002 as Chief Regulatory Counsel for Duke Power and served as Duke Energy's SVP of State and Federal Regulatory Legal Support.

5. Dhiaa M. Jamil (Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer)

  • LinkedIn Profile: N/A
  • Role at Duke Energy: He serves as the Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer at Duke Energy. Jamil is the company's senior executive for the regulated utility, which is responsible for generation, transmission, supply chain, project management and construction as well as other related support functions. Previously, Jamil served as the President of the company's regulated generation and Chief Nuclear Officer, where he was responsible for fleet integration and excellence strategy following the company's merger with Progress Energy.

6. Julie S. Janson (Executive Vice President, External Affairs and President at Carolinas Region)

  • LinkedIn Profile: N/A
  • Role at Duke Energy: She serves as Executive Vice President of External Affairs and President at Duke Energy's Carolinas region. Janson oversees the corporate communications, federal government affairs, strategic policy and sustainability functions, stakeholder strategy and the Duke Energy Foundation. She was the President of Duke Energy's utility operations in Ohio and Kentucky, serving approximately 1 million natural gas and electric customers in southwest Ohio and approximately 230,000 customers in six Northern Kentucky counties from 2008 to 2012.

7. Brian Savoy (Senior Vice President, Chief Transformation and Administrative Officer)

  • LinkedIn Profile: https://www.linkedin.com/in/brian-savoy-3b00434/
  • Role at Duke Energy: He is the SVP of Business Transformation and Technology at Duke Energy. Savoy is responsible for information technology, enterprise security and leading business change to advance the company’s strategic objectives. He joined Duke Energy in 2001 as a Manager in Duke Energy’s energy trading unit and was named Director of Trading and Risk Services later that year. He led the derivative accounting and trading control functions for energy trading and marketing activities and was instrumental in the successful wind-down and disposition of Duke Energy North America in 2005.

8. Harry K. Sideris (Senior Vice President, Customer Experience and Services)

  • LinkedIn Profile: https://www.linkedin.com/in/harry-sideris-594484104/
  • Role at Duke Energy: He is the SVP of Customer Experience and Services at Duke Energy. Sideris is responsible for aligning customer-focused operations and services to deliver a personalized end-to-end customer experience that positions Duke Energy for long-term growth. He served as Duke Energy's Chief Distribution Officer before assuming his current position in October 2019. He oversaw the safe, reliable and efficient operation of Duke Energy's electric distribution systems for the company's six-state service area in this role.

9. Steven K. Young (Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer)

  • LinkedIn Profile: N/A
  • Role at Duke Energy: He is the Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer for Duke Energy and leads the financial function, which includes the controller’s office, treasury, tax, risk management and insurance as well as corporate development. He joined Duke Power in 1980 as a financial assistant. He was named the manager of bulk power agreements in system planning and operating in 1991 and the manager of the rate department in 1993 after a series of promotions within the controller’s department. As a result, he was appointed the Vice President of Rates and Regulatory Affairs at Duke Power’s, with responsibilities in regulatory strategies and policies in rate, financial and accounting matters in April 1998. He was then named SVP and Chief Financial Officer at Duke Power in February 2003, a Group Vice President and Chief Financial Officer in March 2004, and VP and Controller in June 2005.

10. Selim Bingol (Senior Vice President and Chief Communications Officer)

  • LinkedIn Profile: https://www.linkedin.com/in/selim-bingol-5157387/
  • Role at Duke Energy: He is responsible for directing Duke Energy’s communications strategy and services, including internal and external communications support for business segments, media relations, executive communications, brand management and digital communications as the Senior Vice President and Chief Communications Officer. He also served as Senior Vice President of Global Communications at General Motors, where he led the communications department, measurably improving the company’s reputation among stakeholders as it emerged from bankruptcy and the “Government Motors” era.

11. Melody Birmingham-Byrd (Senior Vice President and Chief Procurement Officer)

  • LinkedIn Profile: https://www.linkedin.com/in/melodybirmingham/
  • Role at Duke Energy: She is the Senior Vice President and Chief Procurement Officer for Duke Energy, where she is responsible for both the sourcing and supply chain functions for the company’s regulated and commercial operations. She served as President of Duke Energy’s Indiana operations, the State’s largest electric utility, serving approximately 825,000 customers in 69 of Indiana’s 92 counties before assuming her current responsibility.

12. Keith G. Butler (Senior VP, Global Risk Management and Insurance, and Chief Risk Officer)

  • LinkedIn Profile: https://www.linkedin.com/in/keith-butler-184490/
  • Role at Duke Energy: He is the Senior Vice President of Global Risk Management and Insurance and Chief Risk Officer for Duke Energy, where he is responsible for corporate risk management, with particular focus on the company's market, credit, operational and strategic risks. In addition, he manages the company's insurance programs. He assumed his current position in February 2016. He also served as SVP of Tax at Duke Energy where he was responsible for federal, state, local and international tax compliance, audits, research, structuring and tax planning, property tax, income tax accounting, tax information systems and Sarbanes-Oxley compliance with respect to tax matters.

13. David B. Fountain (Senior VP, Legal, Chief Ethics and Compliance Officer and Corporate Secretary)

  • LinkedIn Profile: https://www.linkedin.com/in/david-fountain-a5a78a13/
  • Role at Duke Energy: He serves as the SVP, Legal, Chief Ethics and Compliance Officer and Corporate Secretary at Duke Energy, where he oversees communications with the company's board of directors and ensures they are apprised of corporate governance and compliance matters. He also served as Duke Energy's North Carolina President, serving approximately 3.3 million electric retail customers and 717,000 natural gas customers before assuming his current role.

14. T. Preston Gillespie (Senior Vice President and Chief Nuclear Officer)

  • LinkedIn Profile: https://www.linkedin.com/in/preston-gillespie-58603125/
  • Role at Duke Energy: He is the SVP and Chief Nuclear Officer for Duke Energy where he is responsible for the safe and efficient operation of the nation’s largest regulated nuclear generating fleet. He also served as the Nuclear Chief Operating Officer, leading nuclear operations for all six of Duke Energy’s nuclear plants before assuming his current position in December 2017. [Source 25]

15. Dwight L. Jacobs (Senior Vice President, Controller and Chief Accounting Officer)

  • LinkedIn Profile: https://www.linkedin.com/in/dwight-jacobs-1049b761/
  • Role at Duke Energy: He has led various financial and strategic teams at Duke Energy since July 2002. He was a partner at Worldwide professional services firm, Arthur Andersen, where he spent 14 years serving clients since graduating from the University of North Carolina in 1988 before assuming his position at Duke Energy.

16. V. Nelson Peeler (Senior Vice President and Chief Transmission Officer)

  • LinkedIn Profile: N/A
  • Role at Duke Energy: He serves as the SVP and Chief Transmission Officer at Duke Energy, where he oversees the safe, reliable and efficient operation of the company’s electric transmission system, which includes over 32,000 miles of high-voltage power lines and more than 3,000 substations in six states. He served as VP of transmission system planning and operations, where he was responsible for real-time monitoring and control of the company’s bulk electric transmission system prior to assuming his current position in October 2016.

17. Regis T. Repko (Senior Vice President and Chief Fossil/Hydro Officer)

  • LinkedIn Profile: N/A
  • Role at Duke Energy: He serves as the SVP and Chief Fossil/Hydro Officer at Duke Energy where he is responsible for the operations of Duke Energy's regulated fossil and hydro power generation fleet in six states, including outage and maintenance services. Repko served as SVP of governance, projects and engineering for Duke Energy's nuclear organization where he was responsible for the company's nuclear corporate functions, including engineering, major projects, governance and operations support before assuming his current position in April 2016.

Helpful insights:

  • There is no LinkedIn profile found for Dhiaa Jamil, instead he has a Bloomberg profile.
  • There is no LinkedIn profile for Julie Janson, instead she has a Bloomberg profile.
  • There is no LinkedIn profile for Steven K. Young, instead he has a Bloomberg profile.
  • There is no LinkedIn profile for V. Nelson Peeler, instead he has a Bloomberg profile.
  • There is no LinkedIn profile for Regis T Repko, instead he has a Bloomberg profile.

Research Strategy:

We began by going through the corporate leadership page of the Duke Energy's official website. From this source, we identified all the C-level executives of the company. We proceeded to identify each person's LinkedIn account. We provided the details about their work history and current responsibilities at Duke Energy but there were no LinkedIn accounts for Dhiaa M. Jamil, Julie S. Janson, Steven K. Young, V. Nelson Peeler, and Regis T. Repko.

We decided to use the search platform called Startpage to see if there are results for the LinkedIn profiles of the other C-level executives but the search was not fruitful. We also went through each employee's Crunchbase account but the links to their LinkedIn account were not found. We went through Bloomberg as well. While there were no LinkedIn accounts featured for the five executives, there was personal information in Dhiaa M. Jamil, Julie S. Janson, Steven K. Young, V. Nelson Peeler, and Regis T. Repko's Bloomberg profiles, which we have used as a replacement for their LinkedIn accounts.



Part
03
of nine
Part
03

Media Scan - Duke Energy

Some unique recent news and media articles about Duke Energy that chronicle any issues over the past 12 months include reports titled, "Duke Energy cautions customers in Indiana to guard against utility scammers", "Duke Energy's monopoly power faces challenges in Southern states", and "Duke Energy challenges NCDEQ coal-ash order in court."


"Duke Energy cautions customers in Indiana to guard against utility scammers"

  • Here is a link to the article.

"Duke Energy restores power to more than 288,000 customers in eastern North Carolina following Hurricane Dorian"

  • Here is a link to the article.
  • Following Hurricane Dorian in 2019, Duke Energy had to restore power to over 288,000 customers in eastern North Carolina.

"Duke Energy's monopoly power faces challenges in Southern states"

  • Here is a link to the article.

"Duke Energy apologizes to customers; working around the clock to fix issues"

  • Here is a link to the article.

"Duke Energy projects winter storm could result in 500,000 power outages"

  • Here is a link to the article.
  • Duke Energy projected that a developing winter storm could result in more than 500,000 power outages in the Carolinas.
  • Due to hazardous and challenging travel and weather conditions, the company would have faced a delay in damage evaluations and subsequently restoration.

"North Carolina orders Duke Energy to evaluate coal retirements"

  • Here is a link to the article.
  • In August 2019, the company received orders from the North Carolina Utility Commission to assess the possibility of shuttering its coal plants in North Carolina. The move was in support of advocating for clean energy within the Carolinas and will impact both Duke Energy Progress (DEP) and Duke Energy Carolinas (DEC).

"Snow doubt about it: Duke Energy preparing for winter storm in Indiana; urges customers to do the same"

  • Here is a link to the article.
  • The company’s line technicians, as well as other employees, had to check supplies, examine equipment, and restock inventories to assure sufficient materials were available to perform repairs and restore any power failures.

"Public Energy Enemy No. 1 : Why Duke, America’s Biggest Electric Utility, Is Also the Worst for the Environment"

  • Here is a link to the article.
  • Lawsuits from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) forced Duke Energy to diminish its dependence on coal as other companies are progressing the development of less expensive, safer, and cleaner renewables, as well as energy storage and the termination of costly, dirty, and hazardous natural gas, coal, and nuclear plants.

"Duke Energy challenges NCDEQ coal-ash order in court"

  • Here is a link to the article.
  • In October 2019, the company challenged a coal-ash order from the NC Department of Environmental Quality (NCDEQ), claiming that the department exceeded its authority when it ordered Duke Energy's utilities to unearth ash ponds at six different coal plants in the state instead of contemplating arguments to enable them to issue a cap on the ash currently in place.


"Duke Energy Wants You To Pay At Least $24 More Each Month For Your Electricity!"

  • Here is a link to the piece.
  • CAC is attempting to safeguard ratepayers from the company's plans to increase its electricity bill tariff rates by approximately 20%.

"Court action possible as Duke Energy challenges SC regulators' recent decisions on rates"

  • Here is a link to the article.
  • Duke Energy Progress' brand-new rates resulted in an average rate expansion of around 6.3% for its residential clients.
Part
04
of nine
Part
04

Biography - Chris Smith Marketing Director at Duke Energy

Chris Smith is married to Shasta Bryant Smith and has three children. He graduated in 2007 from Central Piedmont Community College.
Further details can be found below.

Career

  • Chris Smith has worked at Duke Energy from May 2002 to date.
  • His roles over the years have included assisting in the creation of all seasonal presentations, managing the marketing budget and allocation sheet, writing marketing copy for products and maintaining effective communication with cross functional teams.
  • He also develops new product ideas and brand concepts at Duke Energy.

Education

Family Life

Social Media

  • Smith only has an account on Facebook where he posts sporadically. He last posted in July and has 393 friends.
  • His LinkedIn page only contains information of his current role at Duke Energy.

Research Strategy

There's limited information in the public domain on the personal background of Chris Smith. We were unable to locate information on his hobbies and the causes he supports. We sought to locate information on the individual by first searching through professional networking sites like LinkedIn, ZoomInfo, Bloomberg. The information provided on the mentioned sources were limited to his professional background and contact details; there was no information on his interests.
By searching through social media, we were able to locate a Facebook account belonging to him. We reviewed his publicly available information on Facebook and leveraged the information from his profile to provide a brief insight into his personal life. On searching through other social media platforms like Instagram and Twitter, we discovered that he has no account on other social media platforms aside from Facebook, and we weren't able to provide a deeper dive into his personal life through this strategy.
We attempted to find further information about Chris by searching the alumni information at the college he attended. There was little information available publicly; login was required to access any information of a personal nature. Next, we combed through media sources for mentions and interviews on him. The goal was to locate interviews or events he attended and leverage the information from the media sites to provide a deep dive into her life. Unfortunately, this strategy also failed as there's was no interview on her and information about her were limited to her professional life.

Through these strategies we were able to find all the information required except Christ Smith's hobbies and the causes he supports.
Part
05
of nine
Part
05

Duke Energy - The Competitors

Some true competitors to Duke Energy include Public Service Enterprise Group, PG&E Corporation, Southern Company, American Electric Power, Xcel Energy, PPL Corporation, and Entergy.

Public Service Enterprise Group

PG&E Corporation

Southern Company

American Electric Power

Xcel Energy

PPL Corporation

Entergy

RESEARCH STRATEGY

We commenced our search by looking for media reports, articles, blogs and other databases that offered the competitors to Duke Energy. Once gathered, we then gathered information related to the competitors and finalized our findings.
Part
06
of nine
Part
06

Duke Energy - Competitors: The Findings Part One

Duke Energy and Public Service Enterprise Group provide electric and gas utility services as well as renewable energy services. The competitive advantages, strengths, weaknesses, revenues, and geographic footprints have been outlined below.

Duke Energy

Competitive Advantage

  • Duke Energy has been working on expanding renewable energy options for its customers. The Green Source Advantage program from the company was recently approved by the North Carolina Utilities Commission, which has allowed the company to expand its renewable energy portfolio.
  • Price is a significant factor when it comes to the provision of energy services to the residential market. Duke Energy uses "a balanced mix of energy resources having different operating characteristics and fuel sources designed to provide energy at the lowest possible cost to meet its obligation to serve retail customers."

Strengths

Weaknesses

  • The company is working to improve in terms of technology. They are doing this by providing better options to customers for paying their bills, starting a service, and reporting outages.
  • The company is also "modernizing the energy grid" and installing smart meters for its customers.

Revenue

Geographic Footprint

  • The company provides electric and gas utilities to customers in a total of 7 states, including North Carolina, South Carolina, Florida, Indiana, Ohio, Tennessee, and Kentucky. The company also provides renewable energy services throughout the US as well.

Public Service Enterprise Group

Competitive Advantage

  • PSEG's balance sheet provides them a competitive advantage in reacting to changes in the federal corporate tax code that was recently enacted.

Strengths

Weaknesses

  • The company is working to improve through the provision of cleaner energy, such as solar energy.
  • Affordability is another area where the company is trying to improve upon.

Revenue

  • The company generated annual revenue of $9.7 billion in 2018.

Geographic Footprint

  • The company operates in the Northeastern and Mid-Atlantic United States.

Research Strategy

Most of the details for both the companies were available directly through their annual reports and websites, except for the weaknesses identified. Since the companies do not identify their weaknesses directly, we have considered areas where they are working to improve as their 'perceived weaknesses'.
Part
07
of nine
Part
07

Duke Energy - Competitors: The Findings Part Two

PG&E Corporation and Southern Company are Duke Energy's competitors. Their competitive advantages, strengths, weaknesses, revenue, and operation locations are outlined below.

PG&E Corporation

1. Competitive Advantage

2. Strengths

  • To serve its customers effectively and reliably, PG&E Corporation has heavily invested in energy infrastructure consisting of 7,686 MW of company-owned hydroelectric, nuclear, natural gas, solar, and fuel cell generation. It also owns about 107,000 circuit miles of power distribution lines and 18,000 circuit miles of power transmission lines. Others are 4,800 miles of gas supply lines, 6,600 miles local gas transmission lines, and three gas storage units.
  • The company has a vast experience spanning over 110 years. Today, it is one of the largest combined natural gas and electric energy firms in the US. Such extensive experience enables it to navigate the various market dynamics.
  • PG&E Corporation also has strong research and development (R&D) capabilities. Its effective nuclear power facilities attest to the company’s commitment to R&D.

3. Weaknesses

  • PG&E Corporation operates under government regulation. Sometimes, a government intervention in the energy sector may trigger operational inefficiencies. For instance, the company has a long record of run-ins with government regulators with regard to false records of ground-marking at excavation sites intended to safeguard buried electricity cables and gas pipelines.
  • Despite being in operation for many years, PG&E Corporation has limited expansion to other product segments due to its current organization structure. Notably, the structure is only compatible with the current business model.

4. Revenue

5. Countries/cities

Southern Company

1. Competitive advantage

  • Southern Company’s competitive advantage emanates from its commitment to innovation. The company has invested over $2 billion in industry-breaking research and development since its inception in 1970 to come up with cutting-edge innovations.

2. Strengths

  • Southern Company has a diversified energy portfolio consisting of 27% coal electric power, 47% natural gas, 15% nuclear, and 11% renewable energy.
  • The company also has a strong distribution network in almost every state that makes its services accessible to many customers. It provides affordable energy through electric companies in three states, natural gas distribution firms in four states, and a competitive generation firm serving customers across the United States.
  • Southern Company has a strong and recognizable brand associated with excellent customer service, reliability, and affordable prices below the national average.

3. Weaknesses

4. Revenue

5. Countries/Cities

  • Southern Company provides energy solutions to its customers across the United States through its subsidiaries. It operates 49 regulated facilities in 12 states, including Alabama, California, Delaware, Georgia, Kansas, Maine, Minnesota, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, Oklahoma, and Texas.







Part
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Part
08

Duke Energy - Competitors: The Findings Part Three

American Electric Power (AEP) and Xcel Energy are two of Duke Energy's major competitors. Their competitive advantages, strengths, weaknesses, revenue, locations of operation are provided below.

American Electric Power

1. Competitive Advantage

  • American Electric Power’s competitive advantage lies in its geographical dominance. The company’s transmission network stretches more than 40,000 miles, which is the largest in the United States.

2. Strengths

  • American Electric Power enjoys a combined capacity of 26,000 megawatts from approximately 60 generating stations. The power is enough to serve about 26 million customers.
  • The company's efficiency in its power plants has earned it a reputation as an innovative, pioneering, dependable, and a low-cost power producer. The efficiency reduces operational costs.
  • American Electric Power also uses a diverse fuel mix to produce energy, including clean energy solutions. Coal plants account for AEP’s 45% power output, while natural gas and nuclear account for 28% and 7%, respectively. Others are wind, hydro, and other sources accounting for 17% as well as energy efficiency with 3%. Such a varied generating portfolio enhances the company’s reliability.

3. Weaknesses

  • Using coal power, which accounts for 45% of its total output, makes the company vulnerable to “green legislation.”
  • American Electric Power has not fully taken advantage of renewable sources of energy in order to reduce its environmental footprint. A company of its stature should be taking advantage of technological advancement to produce low-emission energy.

4. Revenue

5. Cities/Countries

Xcel Energy

1. Competitive Advantage

  • Xcel Energy’s competitive advantage is its focus on renewable energy and reducing carbon and other emissions. The company is the first energy provider in the US to declare its desire to serve its customers with 100% carbon-free electricity by 2050.

2. Strengths

  • Xcel Energy enjoys a strong reputation because of its focus on clean energy. The company is a recognized industry leader in clean energy.
  • Xcel Energy is good in product innovation. The firm collaborates with researchers, technology developers, and other stakeholders in the industry to leverage on emerging energy technology. Currently, the company is focusing on using modular nuclear reactors that can generate carbon-free power more safely compared to the existing nuclear power plants.

3. Weaknesses

  • Compared to other global players in the industry, Xcel Energy has a limited energy portfolio with a combined output of just 18,000 megawatts of electricity.

4. Revenue

5. Countries/Cities




Part
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of nine
Part
09

Duke Energy - Competitors: The Findings Part Four

PPL Corporation and Entergy Corporation are two of Duke Energy’s competitors who have annual revenues of $7.8 billion and $11 billion, respectively

PPL Corporation

PPL Corporation’s annual revenue is $7.8 billion.
PPL Corporation has locations in the US in areas such as Kentucky, Virginia and Pennsylvania as well as in England and South Wales.

Competitive Advantage

Strengths

Perceived Weaknesses

  • While the company provides contact information for customers and consumers to reach them, it is limited to a toll-free contact number and specific websites for the business segments but no email address for their sales department.
  • PPL does not post YouTube videos regularly on its channel to engage customers, prospective customers and subscribers and can be seen by the gaps of 1 month, two months or even six months between posts made.
  • PPL’s stock prices in the UK are negatively influenced due to the political climate, resulting in some amount of uncertainty of what to expect and regulatory concerns which may also have some effect on customers.

Entergy Corporation

Competitive Advantage

Strengths

Perceived Weaknesses

Sources
Sources

From Part 02
Quotes
  • "Lynn J. Good Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer"
  • "Melissa H. Anderson Executive Vice President and Chief Human Resources Officer"
  • "Douglas F Esamann Executive Vice President, Energy Solutions and President, Midwest/Florida Regions and Natural Gas Business"
Quotes
  • "Lynn Good is chairman, president and chief executive officer of Duke Energy, America’s largest electric power company. Under her leadership, Duke Energy has intensified its focus on serving its customers and communities well today, while leading the way to a safe, secure and responsible energy future."
  • "Before becoming CEO in 2013, she served as Duke Energy’s chief financial officer, and earlier led the company’s commercial energy businesses during its initial development of renewable energy projects. She began her utility career in 2003 with Cincinnati-based Cinergy, which merged with Duke Energy three years later. Prior to 2003, she was a partner at two international accounting firms, including a long career with Arthur Anderson."
Quotes
  • "EVP Administration and Chief Human Resources Officer Company NameDuke Energy Corporation Dates EmployedJan 2015 – Present Employment Duration4 yrs 11 mos LocationCharlotte, North Carolina Area Leads HR, Real Estate and Administrative Services for a $24B energy company."
Quotes
  • "Melissa Anderson serves as executive vice president and chief human resources officer for Duke Energy. She is responsible for human resources policy and strategy, talent management and diversity, employee and labor relations, total rewards strategies and programs, and delivery of business partner services."
  • "Anderson joined Duke Energy in January 2015 from Domtar Inc., a Canada-based manufacturer of paper and personal care products. From 2010 to 2015, she served as senior vice president of human resources and corporate steward of talent for approximately 10,000 Domtar employees worldwide."
Quotes
  • "Executive Vice President, Energy Solutions and President, Midwest and Florida Regions"
Quotes
  • "As executive vice president, energy solutions, Doug Esamann is responsible for corporate and regulatory strategy, emerging technology and the company's regulated and commercial renewable energy operations. Additionally, he has responsibility for sales and services to commercial, industrial and wholesale customers; the development and marketing of products and solutions for all customer segments; and the company’s economic development efforts."
  • "Previously, Esamann served as president of Duke Energy Indiana, the state's largest electric utility, serving approximately 810,000 customers in 69 of the state's 92 counties. He was responsible for the company's regulatory, governmental relations, economic development and community affairs work in Indiana. He served in that role from November 2010 until June 2015. He assumed added responsibility for the natural gas business in October 2019."
Quotes
  • "Kodwo Ghartey-Tagoe serves as executive vice president and chief legal officer for Duke Energy. He is the primary legal advisor to Duke Energy's board of directors and senior management, and he leads the Office of the General Counsel, which includes the company's legal, corporate secretary, ethics and compliance, and audit functions."
  • "Joining the company in 2002 as chief regulatory counsel for Duke Power, Ghartey-Tagoe has held numerous positions in the legal department covering several areas of legal services to Duke Energy. He served as Duke Energy's senior vice president of state and federal regulatory legal support; general counsel for litigation and vice president, legal, for Duke Energy's Commercial Businesses organization."
  • "He also served as vice president, legal-state regulation for Duke Energy's franchised electric and gas business. Before joining the company, Ghartey-Tagoe was a partner with McGuireWoods LLP in Richmond, Va."
Quotes
  • "Dhiaa Jamil serves as executive vice president and chief operating officer for Duke Energy, one of America's largest energy holding companies. He is the company's senior executive for the regulated utility responsible for generation, transmission, supply chain, project management and construction, as well as other related support functions. "
  • "Jamil has over 38 years of experience in the energy industry. Previously, he served as president of the company's regulated generation and chief nuclear officer, where he was responsible for fleet integration and excellence strategy following the company's merger with Progress Energy."
Quotes
  • "Julie Janson serves as executive vice president of external affairs and president of Duke Energy's Carolinas region. She oversees the corporate communications, federal government affairs, strategic policy and sustainability functions, stakeholder strategy and the Duke Energy Foundation."
  • "Janson's extensive experience in the energy and legal industries includes serving as Duke Energy's chief legal officer, where she was the primary legal advisor to Duke Energy's board of directors and senior management. She led the Office of the General Counsel, which includes the company's legal, corporate governance, ethics and compliance, and corporate audit services functions. Janson also served as Duke Energy's corporate secretary and senior vice president of ethics and compliance."
  • "From 2008 to 2012, Janson served as president of Duke Energy's utility operations in Ohio and Kentucky, serving approximately 1 million natural gas and electric customers in southwest Ohio and approximately 230,000 customers in six Northern Kentucky counties."
Quotes
  • "Brian Savoy is senior vice president, business transformation and technology for Duke Energy. He is responsible for information technology, enterprise security and leading business change to advance the company’s strategic objectives."
  • "Prior to this role, he served as chief accounting officer and controller for Duke Energy where his responsibilities included the accounting, financial reporting and internal controls for the corporation."
  • "Savoy joined Duke Energy in 2001 as a manager in Duke Energy’s energy trading unit, Duke Energy North America. He was named director of trading and risk services later in that year. Savoy led derivative accounting and trading control functions for energy trading and marketing activities and was instrumental in the successful wind-down and disposition of Duke Energy North America in 2005."
Quotes
  • "Harry Sideris is senior vice president of customer experience and services for Duke Energy. He is responsible for aligning customer-focused operations and services to deliver a personalized end-to-end customer experience that positions Duke Energy for long-term growth."
  • "Sideris has more than 23 years of experience in the energy industry. Before assuming his current position in October 2019, he served as Duke Energy's chief distribution officer. In this role he oversaw the safe, reliable and efficient operation of Duke Energy's electric distribution systems for the company's six-state service area, including North Carolina, South Carolina, Florida, Indiana, Ohio and Kentucky."
Quotes
  • "Steve Young is executive vice president and chief financial officer for Duke Energy. He leads the financial function, which includes the controller’s office, treasury, tax, risk management and insurance, as well as corporate development."
  • "Young joined Duke Power in 1980 as a financial assistant. After a series of promotions within the controller’s department, he was named manager of bulk power agreements in system planning and operating in 1991, and manager of the rate department in 1993."
  • "In April 1998, Young was appointed vice president of rates and regulatory affairs, with responsibility for Duke Power’s regulatory strategies and policies in rate, financial and accounting matters."
  • "He was named senior vice president and chief financial officer for Duke Power in February 2003, group vice president and chief financial officer in March 2004, and vice president and controller in June 2005."
Quotes
  • "As senior vice president and chief communications officer, Selim Bingol is responsible for directing Duke Energy’s communications strategy and services, including internal and external communications support for business segments, media relations, executive communications, brand management and digital communications."
  • "Previously, Selim served as senior vice president of global communications at General Motors Co. In this role, he led all communications, measurably improving the company’s reputation among stakeholders as it emerged from bankruptcy and the “Government Motors” era. "
Quotes
  • "Melody Birmingham-Byrd is senior vice president and chief procurement officer for Duke Energy. In this role, she is responsible for both the sourcing and supply chain functions for the company’s regulated and commercial operations. She assumed her current position in November 2018."
  • "Previously, Birmingham-Byrd served as president of Duke Energy’s Indiana operations, the state’s largest electric utility, serving approximately 825,000 customers in 69 of Indiana’s 92 counties."
Quotes
  • "Keith Butler is senior vice president, global risk management and insurance, and chief risk officer for Duke Energy. He is responsible for corporate risk management, with particular focus on the company's market, credit, operational and strategic risks. In addition, he manages the company's insurance programs. He assumed his current position in February 2016. "
  • "Previously, Butler served as senior vice president of tax for Duke Energy. He was responsible for federal, state, local and international tax compliance, audits, research, structuring and tax planning, property tax, income tax accounting, tax information systems and Sarbanes-Oxley compliance with respect to tax matters."
Quotes
  • "David Fountain serves as senior vice president, legal, chief ethics and compliance officer and corporate secretary for Duke Energy. He oversees communications with the company's board of directors and ensures they are apprised of corporate governance and compliance matters."
  • "Previously, Fountain served as Duke Energy's North Carolina President, serving approximately 3.3 million electric retail customers and 717,000 natural gas customers."
Quotes
  • "Preston Gillespie is senior vice president and chief nuclear officer for Duke Energy. He is responsible for the safe and efficient operation of the nation’s largest regulated nuclear generating fleet. "
  • "Gillespie has more than 30 years of experience in the nuclear energy field. Before assuming his current position in December 2017, he served as nuclear chief operating officer, leading nuclear operations for all six of Duke Energy’s nuclear plants. "
Quotes
  • "Dwight has led various financial and strategic teams at Duke Energy, a Fortune 150 company, since July 2002. Before then Dwight was a partner at Worldwide professional services firm, Arthur Andersen, where he spent 14 years serving clients since graduating from the University of North Carolina in 1988. "
Quotes
  • "Nelson Peeler serves as senior vice president and chief transmission officer for Duke Energy. He oversees the safe, reliable and efficient operation of Duke Energy’s electric transmission system, which includes over 32,000 miles of high-voltage power lines and more than 3,000 substations in six states. "
  • "Prior to assuming his current position in October 2016, Peeler served as vice president of transmission system planning and operations, where he had responsibility for real-time monitoring and control of the company’s bulk electric transmission system. "
Quotes
  • "Regis Repko serves as senior vice president and chief fossil/hydro officer for Duke Energy. He has responsibility for the operations of the company's regulated fossil and hydro power generation fleet in six states, including outage and maintenance services."
  • "Repko has 30 years of experience in the energy industry. Before assuming his current position in April 2016, he served as senior vice president of governance, projects and engineering for Duke Energy's nuclear organization. He was responsible for the company's nuclear corporate functions, including engineering, major projects, governance and operations support."
From Part 03
Quotes
  • "Duke Energy is warning its customers in Indiana to be on guard against phone calls from utility scammers who are demanding that customers pay their electric bill immediately or risk having their electric service disconnected within the hour."
  • "Scammers have even duplicated the Duke Energy upfront Interactive Voice Response system, so when customers call back phone numbers provided by the scammer, it sounds like a legitimate Duke Energy phone number. Some of these criminals also use caller-ID spoofing to replicate Duke Energy's customer service number"
Quotes
  • "Duke Energy has restored power to more than 288,000 North Carolina customers who lost electricity when Hurricane Dorian's strong winds battered the state's eastern region Thursday and Friday."
Quotes
  • "A newly-formed coalition of advocacy groups has launched a campaign to end Duke Energy's longstanding monopoly control over most of North Carolina's electric system in hopes that permitting competition among power generators would hasten the shift to clean energy and bring pollution relief to vulnerable communities."
Quotes
  • "A squirrel and cold weather are causing several power outages for Duke Energy, most notably this past Monday Nov. 11th."
  • "More than 3,000 homes were left without power for a few hours."
Quotes
  • "Duke Energy meteorologists today modeled the latest forecast for an approaching winter storm and project the heavy wet snow, sleet and freezing rain will result in approximately 500,000 power outages or more for homes and businesses in the Carolinas."
Quotes
  • "The North Carolina Utility Commission has ordered Duke Energy to evaluate the potential to retire each and every one of its coal plants in the state. This is a huge victory for everyone who has advocated for clean energy in the Carolinas. While it will take more proceedings to see what steps Duke Energy will actually take, this is a huge turning point and could affect other utilities in the Southeast."
Quotes
  • "Ahead of this weekend's storm, Duke Energy line technicians and other workers continue to inspect equipment, check supplies and restock inventories to ensure adequate materials are available to make repairs and restore power outages. In addition, Duke Energy meteorologists are continually tracking the storm's path and intensity, and updating forecast models, which influence how the company mobilizes its workers and other resources."
Quotes
  • "Duke Energy says the N.C. Deparment of Environmental Quality decision would raise the costs of closing its ash ponds to $10.6 billion from an estimated $5.6 billion if it is allowed to cap them in place."
Quotes
  • "Duke Energy Corp. has asked the S.C. Public Service Commission to reconsider rate cases for its two utilities in that state. It alleges parts of the board rulings contain "reversible error" and others amount "to an unconstitutional taking" of property in language reinforcing Duke's willingness to take the case to the courts if necessary."