What does diversity mean among Beko's top audience clusters? Cluster 1 includes Netherlands, France, Russia. Cluster 2 includes Italy, Spain, Poland, and Romania. Please begin with one concise sentence that answers each, with supporting points / r...

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What does diversity mean among Beko's top audience clusters? Cluster 1 includes Netherlands, France, Russia. Cluster 2 includes Italy, Spain, Poland, and Romania. Please begin with one concise sentence that answers each, with supporting points / references.

Thank you for your request regarding the meaning of diversity among Beko’s top audience clusters. I was able to compile detailed information on each cluster of countries in question. According to research data compiled in 2017 through the Social Progress Imperative Organization, I was able to find information pertinent to this research. I used data on each country to develop a scaled comparison on factors for diversity for each country and cluster. The Social Progress Index report included data from 128 countries and ranked each on 50 criteria ranging from the country's ability to provide basic services and infrastructure to cultural specifics involving societal views on homosexuality and reported incidents of violence toward ethnic minorities.

CLUSTER ONE

In cluster one, Russia shows a relatively low level of openness to various forms of diversity in comparison to France and the Netherlands, with the latter two showing significant levels of openness to multicultural diversity, and acceptance of LGBTQ lifestyle choices.

The Netherlands ranked very highly in terms of factors for diversity tolerance overall. The country ranked 1st out of 128 for the relative tolerance its citizens show for homosexuality and freedom of social and cultural expression. The Netherlands also showed a significantly low level of violent occurrences toward minorities and displayed high levels of tolerance toward immigrants, ranking 24th out of 128 countries on the Social Progress Index.
While France ranked somewhat lower than the Netherlands in key factors like its tolerance of ethnic diversity and overall freedom of social and political expression, ranking 38th and 37th respectively, it shows itself to be more socially accepting than not as a whole. France was also shown to be a highly educated nation, ranking 3rd out of 128 in its ability to provide higher education in “globally ranked” universities.
In Russia, we see a marked decrease in factors related to openness to diversity compared to the other two countries in this cluster, with the lowest amounts of acceptance displayed toward those that are ethnically diverse. Incidents of discrimination or violence toward minorities rank 114th out of 128 in Russia while their tolerance for immigrants came in at 108th out of 128 as well. Homosexuality is somewhat more accepted than multiculturalism in Russia with a rank of 87th out of 128. In contrast to its levels of ethnic tolerance, women in Russia are a highly educated sector of society with a relative low “level of inequality in the attainment of education” in comparison to both France and the Netherlands.

CLUSTER TWO

The four countries in cluster two show consistently high levels of tolerance toward diversity overall, although Romania and Poland are much less accepting of members of the LGBTQ community.
Italy ranked high in freedom of expression at 19th of 128 and religious tolerance, showing that the country valued diversity of social and political thought. It also ranked fairly high in terms of the relative tolerance toward homosexuality and the documented incidents of discrimination and violence toward minorities of various types. Lower on the scale were Italy’s tolerance for immigration, ranking 56th.
Spain was the most highly accepting of diversity of all types in comparison to the other countries in this cluster. Its citizens ranked highest in religious tolerance at 1st out of 128 and acceptance of LGBTQ rights at 7th out of 128. Spain also valued individuality in social and political expression, and showed a high level of tolerance toward immigration. In contrast to these numbers, Spanish women were shown to attend the lowest average number of years in full-time education in comparison to the other three countries in this cluster at only 13.5 average total years in school.
Poland ranked 1st out of 128 in terms of its tolerance for diversity of religious thought, making it highly progressive in that area. It ranked relatively highly as well in accepting social and political freedom of expression, but with a significantly low level of acceptance toward immigrants. The country’s acceptance of homosexuality was middling to low overall, with a rank of 71st out of 128. However, Polish people tend to value equal access to education across gender lines with women averaging nearly 15 years attending educational institutions.
Romania, like Poland, also ranked rather high in terms of gender equality in education but came out lowest in other factors related to tolerating diversity. The country’s citizens ranked lowest of all four countries in this cluster for their tolerance of immigration and the relative incidents of discrimination toward minorities (ranking 123rd and 73rd respectively). Romanians are also relatively intolerant to LGBTQ lifestyle choices in comparison to the other three countries.

CLUSTER THREE

The United States and the United Kingdom were nearly equal in terms of how they tolerated diversity as a whole, with the highest levels of acceptance involving tolerance for LGBTQ lifestyle choices and immigration compared to countries in other clusters.
The United States and the United Kingdom both showed a relatively low level of overall tolerance for religious freedom of expression, jointly ranking 92nd. While both countries showed similar levels of tolerance for diversity, they differed significantly in terms of freedom of social and political freedom of expression, with the US ranking 1st out of 128 and the UK ranking 37th. Both countries displayed high levels of tolerance for homosexuality (both ranking in the top 20 countries) and ethnic diversity with the UK ranking slightly higher in both criteria. Women in the United States were only slightly more educated than in the UK with American woman attending an average of 15.06 years in school to the United Kingdom’s 14.9.

CLUSTER FOUR

The two countries in cluster four, China and Thailand, ranked low in all areas related to tolerating diversity on nearly equal levels.
Both countries showed significantly low rates of gender equality in education with Chinese women attending an average of just 9.82 years in school and Thai women attending 10.09. The relative lack of value in educating female citizens in these two countries shows a potential bias against depictions of women in areas of educational or career related success. While Thailand ranked higher in its acceptance of LGBTQ lifestyles than China (ranking 45th to China’s 76th out of 128), both countries showed similar levels of intolerance toward ethnic diversity. Both countries also displayed low levels of acceptance for freedom of social and political expression, with China ranking strikingly low at 120th out of 128 compared to Thailand’s 107th out of 128.

CONCLUSION

Of all countries researched included on the Social Progress Index, the clusters displaying the greatest overall levels of tolerance for diversity included clusters one and three, with clusters two and four coming in lower. Clusters one and two displayed a range of factors and differing levels of diversity acceptance while cluster three and four countries showed more uniformity. Cluster three showed the most consistently progressive views in accepting all forms of diversity, while cluster four countries were the least progressive of all clusters researched.
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