DML Executive Summary: Poland

Part
01
of one
Part
01

DML Executive Summary: Poland

In general the Polish government has fallen significantly behind the rest of the EU in digital media literacy both in the schools and in the general public. The private sector has begun to fill the gap with programs that develop training and resources for teachers. A copy of this response can also be found here.

Misinformation/DML Prevalence

  • Poland has two major challenges affecting its citizens. The Russian speaking citizenry left from the times when Poland was a communist country tends to believe the Russian propaganda, while there is a preponderance of Polish people who get their news from Facebook and believe what they read.
  • Poland has a non-profit that authenticates news, but even that service was replicated by a fake Facebook account spreading disinformation.

DML Government Actions

  • The Polish government is taking disinformation threats seriously, including banning foreigners who were proven to be spreading disinformation and blocking websites it deems to be a threat to national security.
  • On the positive side, Poland has revamped its curriculum to increase DML and has a Digital School initiative underway.

DML Players

  • The Polish government has two Ministries, which support the increase in DML in the country. The first is the Ministry of Education, which has revamped the secondary school curriculum to include ICT and DML.
  • The other is the Ministry of Digital Affairs, responsible for developing broadband infrastructure, supporting the creation of web content and e-services, and promoting digital competences among citizens.

DML Initiatives

  • The government is relatively inactive in the efforts to increase DML in Poland.
  • The majority of the initiatives described were funded by NGO's and their cross-collaboration. Programs include teacher training for DML, DML for disabled people, and critical thinking being taught by journalists.

DML Opinion/Commentary

  • Government support has been intermittent, and uptake by teachers has been sporadic. There is no coherent state policy when it comes to media literacy, and there is a lack of consolidation of the entire community gathered around this subject.
  • Poland is currently five to seven years behind other countries in the EU.






Sources
Sources