Dental Implant Indicators

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01
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Part
01

Non-Clinical Dental Implant Indicators

Dental implants are a stable, enduring replacement alternative for teeth that are missing or have been irreparably damaged and require extraction. Some non-clinical indicators that a dental patient may require implants include fractured or broken tooth, jaw bone loss, dentures causing gum irritation, and difficulty chewing.

Fractured or Broken Tooth

Jaw Bone Loss

Dentures that Cause Gum Irritation

Difficulty Chewing

Research Strategy

To find non-clinical indicators that a dental patient may require implants, we combed health websites dealing with dentistry, blogs by professional dentists, and trusted articles. The research team further searched through articles by renowned healthcare organizations like Mayo Clinic and Web Md. From these resources, fractured or broken tooth, jaw bone loss, dentures causing gum irritation, and difficulty chewing were identified as some non-clinical indicators that a dental patient may require implants.

Part
02
of two
Part
02

Dental Implant Demographics

Americans who need dental implants are likely to be married Black males who are older than 75, live below the poverty line, and have less than a high school education. However, Americans who are more likely to get dental implants are married females who are 65 years old or older, have an annual income of at least $50,000 and are college educated. Details of our findings are below.

Age

  • According to a 2016 Centers for Disease Control (CDC) study, 5.6% of people between the ages of 50 and 64 have lost all their natural teeth. This is compared with 1.6% of people between the ages of 35 and 49.
  • As people age, the percentage of tooth loss climbs even higher, with 13% of people between the ages of 65 and 74 and 22.5% of people age 75 or older having lost all their teeth.
  • Similarly, the average number of remaining teeth for people between the ages of 20 and 34 is 27.0, compared to 25.5 for people between 35 and 49 years old and 23.4 for people between 50 and 64 years old. The adult mouth should have 32 permanent teeth.
  • The average number of remaining teeth for people between the ages of 65 and 74 is 21.7 and for people age 75 and older, the average is 19.5.
  • A 2015 study published in the Journal of Advanced Prosthodontics showed that after learning about dental implants from a TED-talk-like presentation, people over the age of 65 were more likely to accept dental implants as a treatment for tooth loss at 61.2% compared to people under the age of 65, at 38.8%.
  • This suggests that older Americans are more likely to need dental implants than younger Americans and are more likely to seek dental implant treatment.

Gender

  • The CDC report indicates that 2.2% of males have lost all their natural teeth compared to 2.1% of females.
  • Both males and females have the same average number of remaining teeth at 25.5.
  • In the study published in the Journal of Advanced Prosthodontics, women were more likely than men to accept dental implants as a treatment for tooth loss at a percentage of 78.3% to 21.7%.
  • This means that males are slightly more likely than females to need dental implants, but females are more open to getting dental implants.

Race/Ethnicity

  • The CDC report shows that 2.4% of white Americans have lost all their natural teeth compared to 2.3% of Black Americans and 0.7% of Hispanic Americans.
  • However, Black Americans have the lowest average number of remaining teeth at 24.2 compared to 25.7 for White Americans and 25.4 for Hispanic Americans.
  • This data indicates that Black Americans are more likely to need dental implants than either White or Hispanic Americans.

Income Level

  • The CDC found that 6.1% of Americans who are below 100% of the federal poverty line have lost all their natural teeth compared to 3.7% of people between 100% and 199% of the federal poverty line and 1.1% of people at 200% or above the federal poverty line.
  • Additionally, Americans who are below 100% of the federal poverty line have an average number of 23.6 remaining teeth compared with 24.4 for people between 100% and 199% of the federal poverty line and 26.1 for people at 200% or above the federal poverty line.
  • In the report published in the Journal of Advanced Prosthetics, people with incomes of more than $50,000 per year are more likely to accept dental implants as a treatment for tooth loss at 79.3% than people who earn less than $50,000 per year (20.1%).
  • This information shows that people who have lower income levels are more likely to need dental implants than people with higher income levels. However, higher income individuals are more likely to get dental implants.

Education Level

  • The CDC study indicates that 5.4% of American adults who have less than a high school education have lost all their natural teeth compared to 2.3% of people who graduated from high school and 1.1% of people who have more than a high school education.
  • Likewise, adults who have not graduated from high school have the lowest average number of remaining teeth at 23.5 compared to 25.5 for high school graduates and 26.1 for those who have completed at least some college.
  • The study published in the Journal of Advanced Prosthetics showed that people who have at least a college education are more likely to accept dental implants as a treatment for tooth loss at 65.06% compared to people who have no college education (34.94%).
  • This means that people who have less education are more likely to need dental implants, but people with more education are more likely to get dental implants.

Marital Status

  • The study published in the Journal of Advanced Prosthodontics found that 66.3% of married attendees were willing to accept implant therapy. This is compared with 24.1% of single attendees and 9.6% of participants with "other" marital status.
  • This indicates that married people are more likely to accept dental implants as a solution for tooth loss than single people.

Research Strategy

To identify the demographics of individuals who require dental implants in the U.S., we began by searching for directly available statistics from official dental associations such as the American Dental Association, the American Academy of Implant Dentistry, and the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, among others, but we only found demographics on tooth loss and not directly for people who need dental implants. We expanded our search to general medical associations and organizations such as the Center for Disease Control (CDC), the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and the World Health Organization, but again, only tooth loss was discussed, along with dental implants as a solution to tooth loss.

Finally, we looked for demographics reported in reputable media sources such as WebMD, Healthline, HealthCentral, and others, but all statistics quoted in those sources referred back to studies conducted on tooth loss. Therefore, we made the assumption that since dental implants are only necessary for tooth loss, people who have lost teeth are the most likely to need dental implants. We searched for the most recent data available and found a report from the CDC that was published in 2019. However, it only contains 2016 data. After repeating the above-mentioned searches for more recent data, we discovered that 2016 statistics are in fact the most recent available and therefore make up the bulk of our findings. Note that we also included statistics on racial and ethnic demographics as they were available from the CDC.

Unfortunately, the CDC report did not include statistics on the marital status of people who need dental implants. So, we continued our search through reports from the Journal of the American Dental Association, the NCBI, and other academic research repositories in an attempt to find marital status statistics for dental implant patients. We were unable to find any directly available data that showed the marital status of Americans who need dental implants. However, we did find a slightly older report published in the NCBI that showed the willingness of married people to accept dental implants as a treatment for tooth loss compared with single people. Due to the lack of other data, we used this information as a proxy for those who need dental implants. In the course of studying this report, though, we discovered that people who need dental implants and people who are willing to get dental implants are two different demographics. Therefore, we provided information on both people who need dental implants and people who would get them in our analysis.
Sources
Sources