Dementia in Canada

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01
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Part
01

Prevalence of Dementia in Canada

Over 432,000 seniors above the age of 65 live with diagnosed dementia in Canada, 65% of whom are women. According to data from the Canadian Institute for Health Information, dementia is s prevalent as heart failure and more prevalent than stroke among Canadians aged 80 and older.

Dementia Statistics in Canada

  • According to the most recent data on dementia in Canada (2016-2017), over 432,000 seniors above the age of 65 live with diagnosed dementia in Canada, 65% of whom are women.
  • The prevalence rate of dementia among seniors is broken down by age groups as follows:
  • As per the national data on the prevalence and incidence of dementia in Canada, the percentage of seniors living with dementia went up by 9% in ten years.
  • When the data is broken down, it reveals that about 9 people over the age of 65 in Canada are diagnosed with dementia every hour.
  • According to data obtained from the Canadian Chronic Disease Surveillance System (CCDSS) in April 2018 (excluding Saskatchewan), "the risk of being diagnosed with dementia doubles with every 5 year increase in age, between the ages of 65 and 84" and "the all-cause mortality rate in seniors with diagnosed dementia is 4.4 times higher than that of seniors without."
  • The number of seniors living with dementia in Canada has increased by 83% between 2002 and 2013, and it is expected that in 20 years, the population of people living with dementia will double due to the rapid population growth and the aging population.
  • According to the Public Health Agency of Canada and CIHI, around 76,000 new cases of dementia are diagnosed in Canada every year, representing about 14.3 new cases per 1,000 people 65 and older.
  • The prevalence of dementia among Canadians aged 80 and older is the same as the prevalence of heart failure and is more prevalent than stroke
  • According to the most recent data available, seniors over the age of 65 are the most affected by dementia as the number of people aged 65 and over living with Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia has been rising steadily.
  • As per the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI), the prevalence of dementia among Canadians younger than 65 is low at only 3% of the total number of people living with dementia in Canada.
  • Statistics show that 54% of the 2,481 patients younger than 65 that were diagnosed with dementia were male.

Other Dementia Insights in Canada

  • According to the Alzheimer Society of Canada and PHAC estimates that the total healthcare costs incurred in the care for people with dementia are 5.5 times higher than the costs for those without dementia.
  • The National Population Health Study of Neurological Conditions projects that by 2031, the total annual health care costs for Canadians with dementia will be double from $8.3 billion in 2011 to $16.6 billion in 2031.
  • Canadians under the age of 65 that are diagnosed with dementia tend to stay longer in the hospital since it's difficult to find age-appropriate services and appropriate home-support devices for younger patients.

Research Strategy

To provide data on the prevalence of dementia in Canada, we searched through government databases and health industry data sources such as the Canadian Chronic Disease Surveillance System (CCDSS), the Public Health Agency of Canada, the Alzheimer's Society of Canada, the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI), among other sources.

Data Recency

We have used the most accurate and most recently available data and statistics garnered from the above sources. Most of the data is not current and was collected from 2014 to 2017. However, all the sources we used quote it as the most recent data available, and it's even used and disseminated by the government of Canada as the most recent data on dementia.
Part
02
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Part
02

Canadian's Perceptions Towards Dementia

While there is no current data available for the years 2019 and 2020 on Canadian perception of dementia, we made a presentation of the most recent statistics available from leading organizations such as the Government of Canada, and the Alhazier Association Canada, among others.

Useful Findings

  • According to the World Health Organization, "dementia is a syndrome in which there is deterioration in memory, thinking, behavior and the ability to perform everyday activities," and the "Alzheimer disease is the most common form of dementia and may contribute to 60–70% of cases."
  • Over 432,000 Canadians 65 years and older are living with dementia, and two-thirds of the diagnosed cases are women.

Some Forms Of Stigma For Dementia Canada

  • Canadians acknowledge that 58% of people living with dementia in Canada are likely to be ignored or dismissed.
  • Canadians also believe that 57% of people with dementia are being taken advantage of in one form or the other.
  • In Canada, about 56% of people living with dementia have difficulty accessing appropriate services.
  • About 37% of Canadians with dementia are approached with fear or suspicion.
  • Approximately 50% of Canadians would not want others to know about their diagnosis of dementia.
  • 51% of Canadians admit using some forms of discriminatory language against people with dementia.
  • 30% of Canadians tell dementia-related jokes.
  • 36% of Canadians, according to a survey report, would not be comfortable interacting with a person with dementia.

Research Strategy

To unearth the statistics of Canadians by age groups with the knowledge of dementia, we began looking for surveys, government databases, and precompiled information from various news publications. We could not find data specific to any age group in the public domain. The team came across a publication that states that "1 in 4 Canadians" would be ashamed if they had dementia. The implied meaning of the above statement is that a minimum of 25% of all Canadians are aware of this condition.

The Government of Canada and the Alzheimer Society Canada presented survey reports about stigma and dementia in Canada. These two organizations are believed to have up to date statistics on dementia cases. However, their latest report in 2019 still reported on some statistical survey reports from 2017, which suggests that these are the latest statistics available in the public domain else such organization of repute would update Canadians on the most recent statistics.

The team made a report from these publications assuming those statistics to be the latest statistics on the subject matter as published by these leading organizations. The team had to also use publications in 2018 to augment research findings. This was done because most of the reputable organizations were also referencing statistics beyond the year 2018 time frame in its research.
Part
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Part
03

Canadian Patient Journey - Memory Issues

Loss of memory is a major concern for many senior citizens. Some data and statistics surrounding the typical Canadian patient's journey when they think that there may be a problem with their memory that could be dementia are presented below.

  • Dementia is expected to be a growing concern as the population of Canada ages. Over 432,000 Canadians 65 years of age and older are living with diagnosed dementia. Women account for approximately two-thirds of these patients.
  • Although no single test can definitively diagnose Alzheimer’s or another dementia, it can now be accurately diagnosed by a family physician through a combination of clinical evaluation, cognitive screening, basic laboratory evaluation and structural imaging. Guidelines for diagnosis are provided by 4th Canadian Consensus Conference on Diagnosis and Treatment of Dementia.
Part
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Part
04

Canadian Charity Giving Habits

Canadians seem to be prolific givers, with over a third of them donating to a charity in the last 12 months. Some top causes Canadians give to are helping the poor, children, and religious organizations. Most Canadians give to charity because they care for the causes they are giving to. Other motivations include wanting to help individuals that are less fortunate, as well as to feel good about themselves and trusting the organizations they donate to. In all the literature we reviewed, we did not find any information on the number of charities a typical Canadian donates to in a year.

Charitable Giving in Canada

  • All the data below is from a publication titled "Canada Giving 2019" that was published in March 2019 by the Charities Aid Foundation. It is based on 1,002 interviews conducted between August 2 and 31 of 2018 on a nationally representative sample weighted to the known population data on age, gender, and region.
  • Nearly two-thirds of Canadians donated to a Charity in the last 12 months.
  • The median amount Canadians donated to charity in 2018-19 was C$150, an increase from C$104 in 2017, with the average amount being C$327.
  • "Helping the poor" and "children" were the two most common causes Canadians gave to, tied at 29% each, followed by "religious organizations" at 26%.
  • On the topic of why Canadians decide to donate, 56% of them give to a cause because they care for it, while 40% donate because they desire to help those that are less fortunate
  • Other popular reasons people chose to donate (multiple answers were allowed) include to make a difference (36%), to make themselves feel good (35%), and because they trust the organizations they are donating to (34%).
  • Almost three quarters (73%) of Canadians believe that charities have had a positive impact on both their local community and Canada as a whole.
  • 45% of those surveyed would donate more if they had more money.
  • 37% would donate more if they knew how their money would be spent.

Research Strategy

One of the first publications we scrutinized while looking for the most updated data on charitable giving data for Canada came from government sources (i.e., StatCan). We found that the latest StatCan data was from 2018, which prompted us to widen our search to other sources like SectorSource and the Canada Helps Giving Report. The latest data from SectorSource was from 2013 latest, and the most recent information from the Giving Report was from 2018. Finally, we decided to source our statistics from a publication titled "Canada Giving 2019" that was published in March 2019 by the Charities Aid Foundation, since it provided the most recent data of all the sources reviewed and was based on a reasonably sound survey methodology.

After scouring through multiple government and research sources, including those listed above, we were unable to determine the number of charities that the typical Canadian gives to each year. We also explored statistical sites, such as Statista. These types of websites specialize in offering recent and historical data surrounding a multitude of topics, including charitable giving. While were able to locate many reports centered on charitable giving in Canada, none of them offered data on the number of charities the typical Canadian gives to each year.

We also consulted entities focused on charity in Canada that publish publicly available reports or run blogs on charitable giving in the country, such as Canadian Charity Law, Abundance Canada, etc., hoping they would provide information on the topic at hand. However, none of the sources we came across presented details on the number of charities that the typical Canadian gives to each year.
Sources
Sources