Dairy Market - Consumption

Part
01
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Part
01

Consumption Trends - Dairy Desserts in Foodservice

After an extensive search through market research reports and food industry websites, information on consumption trends of dairy desserts in foodservice across age ranges was unavailable. However, helpful insights on the dairy dessert market in foodservice and some statistics on US consumption have been provided below.

DAIRY DESSERTS IN FOODSERVICE

  • The foodservice market has a slightly larger share (55%) of the total US ice cream and frozen dessert market compared to the retail sector.
  • Ice cream and frozen dessert sales have hovered near $27 billion for the past several years, and foodservice sales comprise $15.7 billion.
  • There is a downward trend in foodservice growth since 2016 due to restaurant closures, causing a rise in retail ice cream sales.
  • According to KanPak, 50% of restaurants have ice cream on their menu, while 11% of the restaurants offer milkshake.

CONSUMER CONSUMPTION

  • According to KanPak, 68% of consumers most often enjoy soft-serve ice cream as a snack, specifically in the afternoon.
  • Milkshakes are commonly consumed with a meal, especially during lunch — 47% of the time.
  • The top reason for consuming frozen desserts, according to 60% of respondents in KanPak's survey, was to satisfy the craving, while the second most cited reason was to treat themselves.
  • According to the Datassential Dessert's Sweet Spot Keynote Report 2019, ice cream is still the most consumed dessert.
  • According to 45% of operators, dessert beverages rank among the top three in the best-selling desserts. These include affogatos and milkshakes.

MILLENNIALS

  • According to a report from Dean Foods, Millennials, who have traditionally skewed their consumption to foodservice, have favored ice cream consumption at home.

RESEARCH STRATEGY

The research team began by looking for pre-compiled consumption statistics on dairy desserts in the foodservice sector through industry reports, market statistics, and surveys on the consumption of dairy dessert in foodservice. We hoped to find data that categorize the age ranges that consume dairy desserts. Unfortunately, there were no pre-compiled studies, reports, or statistics available. We only found market reports behind paywalls that may have the data.

Next, we tried breaking down the criteria looking for data on dairy desserts in general and restaurant/foodservice desserts in general, hoping to find data that would be useful for triangulation. For this, we searched through foodservice websites and food industry organizations such as the International Dairy Foods Association, Think US Dairy, Dean Foods, GS Gelato, Hershey Food Service Insight, and Institute of Food Technologist, as well as research reports from sources like Mintel and Nielsen. This approach yielded helpful data, such as how often dairy desserts appear on restaurant menus and how consumers consume dairy desserts.

We then tried to find trend reports, consumer reports, and surveys with information specific to dessert consumption by age. The idea was to find data on preferences of different age ranges regarding dairy desserts, as a representation of the overall US consumption. While we found generational behavior studies on dining out and dairy preference, there wasn't enough data to triangulate consumption statistics by age range/generation.


Part
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Part
02

Consumption Trends - Aerated Whipped Cream

After an extensive search through-industry related websites, dairy associations, and industry statistic portals, details regarding the consumption trends of aerated whipped cream across age ranges do not appear to be available in the public domain. However, the research team was able to gather valuable insights about the whipped cream market in the U.S.

USEFUL FINDINGS

  • The whipped cream market size in the U.S. in 2015 and 2016 was $508.5 million and $550.1 million respectively.
  • According to Business Wire, the U.S. is the second largest whipping cream consumer after Germany, which consumed 128 kilograms in 2017.
  • According to Grand View Research, the whipped cream market size in the U.S. has been gradually increasing since 2015 and is projected to continue until 2025.
  • It is noteworthy that there is an increased demand for light whipped cream because of health consciousness among consumers.
  • In addition, whipped creams with flavors, such as vanilla, chocolate, cinnamon, and coffee have driven the high demand.
  • Furthermore, social media has played a crucial role in the demand for whipped cream with food bloggers showing people the different ways of using whipped cream in pies, tarts, and cakes.

RESEARCH STRATEGY

We first defined aerated whipped cream by looking at a number of sites such as the Haas Group, Science Direct, and Smart Kitchen. Using these sources, we established that aeration is a process that takes place when making whipped cream. Therefore, whipped cream is always aerated to make it light. As a result, for purposes of this research, “whipped cream” will be considered to be the same as “aerated whipped cream.”

To find the requested information, we first looked through sites that had statistical information on the whipped cream market in the U.S. such as Statista, Grand View Research, and Business Wire. We also looked at media platforms, such as Forbes and PR Newswire. We hoped that we could find useful information on whipped cream consumption trends and statistics by age. However, these sources only provided information regarding the global whipped cream market with limited information on the U.S. whipped cream consumption by age or age group.

We then attempted to look at whipped cream manufacturers in the U.S. such as Instant Whip, Morningstar Foods, and Saputo Dairy Foods. We went through their websites and attempted to look at their annual reports with the hope of finding information about their key demographics by age. However, these companies did not specifically provide information regarding whipped cream and focused on the consumption of fluid milk and cream products in general.

When then looked at dairy events, conferences, and forums, such as the World Dairy Expo and events organized by International Dairy Foods Association. However, none of these events and presentations highlighted any information regarding whipped cream consumption in the U.S. by age. Instead, they focused on technology and ways of making the production process efficient. For these reasons, we arrived at the conclusion that trends and statistics regarding the consumption of whipped cream in the U.S. by age are not available in the public domain.

Part
03
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Part
03

Consumption Trends - Creamer

The research team could not determine the consumption statistics across all age categories of creamer, dairy-based creamer, half-and-half over the last five years. We have, however, provide some useful insights below.

HELPFUL FINDINGS

RESEARCH STRATEGY

The research team could not provide US consumption statistics across all age groups for creamers due to lack of publicly available information. We started our search by scouring through research databases such as Statista, Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health, and the United States Department of Agriculture, looking for statistics that focus on consumer behavior surrounding cream over the past five years. The idea was to use the available databases and use them to identify or use the information as the base to identify the consumption of cream by age. But the search revealed that studies focus on per capita consumption in pounds or in sales value but not by age. Hence, this strategy failed to yield any desired results. We also scoured industry reports that might have reported the consumption of cream in the US by age or any other demographic metric. For this, we explored IBIS World, Mintel, Ipsos, Pew Research, Business Wire, Packaged Facts, among others. However, these reports also focused on the coffee creamer production industry in the US, Refrigerated Coffee Creamers: US market trends, Dairy and Dairy Alternative Beverage Trends in the US, among others but none provided the information needed. Many reports like IBIS World and Packaged Facts were behind a paywall, and hence, we were unable to ascertain if they provide the required information, they may or may not hold the relevant insights.

We then tried to identify the information by triangulating the answer by calculations, which we looked for global consumption of creamers by age over the last five years. For this, we scoured through industry reports like Business Wire, Market Research, MarketsandMarkets, IBIS World, Mintel, Ipsos, Pew Research, among others. The idea here was to focus on the consumption of creamers by age across the globe and check for the US share in the market. We would have then used the same market share across the demographic metric to identify the consumption statistics across all age categories of creamer. However, all available reports focused on the market size, industry players, and trends, among others. Also, many reports like Business Wire, which highlighted the customer landscape among its contents were behind a paywall. As a result, we were unable to ascertain if they provide the required information, they may or may not hold the relevant insights.

Finally, we tried identifying the information by looking for alternate data points to triangulate information. For this, we looked for the top US cream manufacturers and searched their investor presentations, and annual reports hoping to find information on consumer behavior. To identify the top US cream producers, we used Dairy Food Giants to Watch in 2019 by Separators Inc. We then scoured for 2014 to 2018 business reports for each of them, hoping to find insights into the US consumer behavior surrounding their cream products, in order to use this information as a proxy, to answer the query. This strategy also proved futile as all the reports of the companies focused on the revenue, production, trends, among others, but not their customer demographics or consumer behaviors among them.

Data regarding the consumption statistics across all age categories of creamer, dairy-based creamer, half-and-half over the last five years is unavailable. This is most likely as all the statistics focus on the availability of creamers through weight and/or sales value. The lack of this information can also be due to lack of survey/studies conducted in the segment that highlight the demographics of the creamer segment in the US or globally.

Part
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Part
04

Consumption Trends - Cottage Cheese

While the consumption statistics of cottage cheese across all ages could not be located, we were able to determine that baby boomers have been long aware of its benefits and have had it as a regular favorite in their diets from the '70s. Since 2014, cottage cheese brands have been redesigning their approach and targeting younger generation Xers and millennials. In 2019, millennials are showing interest in cottage cheese thanks to its benefits as a healthy, low calorie, and high protein product that can be easily combined with multiple foods.

INDUSTRY STATISTICS

  • BusinessWire created a market report with the demographic information of the US consumers of cottage cheese.
  • In 2015, the US produced 5.3 million metric tons of cheese making him the second largest cheese-producing region in the world, after the EU.
  • According to a study conducted by Statista, the retail sales of cheese in the US is $12.9 billion.
  • Most reports from the cheese industry don't include cottage cheese since it is considered a different type of product based on its production process.
  • Cottage cheese is being marketed as a high protein and low-calorie food.
  • In 2017, the consumption of cottage cheese per capita in the US was 2.1 pounds. This number has remained stable from 2013 to 2015 at 2.1 pounds, only raising at2.2 pounds in 2016.
  • The same year, more than 162 million people in the US consumed cottage cheese as part of their regular diet.
  • 45% of the households in the US buy cottage cheese at least once a year.

DEMOGRAPHIC PERCEPTION AND TRENDS

  • Baby boomers are aware of the benefits they receive from cottage cheese and love its taste.
  • Baby boomers have consistently loved cottage cheese since the '70s.
  • Cottage cheese brands from all around the world are trying to innovate their marketing and presentation of the cottage cheese to attract younger generation Xers and millennials.
  • Younger generations are pleasantly surprised when they try cottage cheese and find their dislike was just a perception.
  • The objective of the cottage cheese brands is to present cottage cheese as an organic, non-GMO, and healthy alternative; while demonstrating that it is trendy and not a mom's food.
  • Millennial consumers, particularly those between 18 and 34 years old, are showing more interest in cottage cheese and considering the product healthy, delicious, and convenient and eager to incorporate it in their diets.

BRANDS DEMOGRAPHIC APPROACH

  • The most used brands of cottage cheese in the US are Store Brand, Daisy, Breakstone's, Knudsen, Dean's, Hood, Friendship, Prairie Farms, Axelrod, and Light 'N Lively.
DEAN FOODS:
  • Sindhura Polasanapalli, Dean Foods' director of innovation, stated that for the past years, cottage cheese has been perceived as food for grandmas.
  • Dean Foods is trying to shift this perception and target younger generations by explaining its nutritional benefits.
  • They've also developed the DairyPure Mix-in line that allows their consumers to eat cottage cheese in a snack package and mix it with a variety of options.
  • Polasanapalli said that staying relevant with their consumers' need is what motivates innovation in their brand. Adding, "there are demographic, cultural and culinary shifts that are changing consumption and purchase behaviors, and we need to innovate and deliver the right solutions to meet those ever-changing needs."
  • Dean Foods has indicated their current target on millennials, due to their spending power and because they represent the largest demographic.
  • Their marketing campaign is focused on changing the perception millennials have about cottage cheese as an older generation's favorite.
DAISY:
  • A market analysis made for Daisy in 2014 recommended a shift in strategy to target "Young Educated Millenial Mothers" between the ages of 25 and 34 years old, with children under six years old, and in households with dual-income.
  • Millennial cottage cheese consumers have a trend to look for healthy food alternatives, but also practical, easy to consume, that will help them keep a balance in their lives.
MUUNA:
  • Gerard Meyer, CEO of Muuna, indicated that in the recent years, they have modified their presentation of cottage cheese and been enthusiastically received by consumers from all generations, millennials, Gen X, and Baby Boomers, as they are all looking for healthy snack options that taste good and are high in proteins.
  • Muuna has successfully created a trendy cottage cheese product that generation Xers and millennials enjoy.
  • To approach millennials, they've used social media influencers and fun marketing campaigns that make cottage cheese look "cool."

RESEARCH STRATEGY

To determine the consumption trends of cottage cheese consumers across age ranges in the US, we began by looking through industry reports that focused on the US market of cottage cheese. We searched through sources like Business Wire, Reuters, Statista, and PR Newswire. This search gave us insights and statistics about the industry in the US, but little information about the consumption trends and demographic breakdown in the past five years. The most valuable information was found through Statista, the most used brands of cottage cheese in the US.
As our next step, we looked through articles, analysis, and news from industry leaders who have talked about the demographic focus of the cottage industry. We reviewed websites like Brandon Gaille's small business and marketing website, Fast Company, Food Business News, Forbes, and government/national sources like the Think US Dairy organization and the US Bureau of Dairy Industry. This search brought a lot of insights about the generation preference. While there wasn't a clear breakdown or analysis by generation, we could find that baby boomers are loyal consumers of cottage cheese since the '70s, we also found that the industry is shifting its focus towards millennials and generation Xers.
As our next step, with the information we gathered from Statista about the most consumed brands of cottage cheese in the US, we looked through these brands' websites for any public statement of their demographics, and through industry analysis made about the brands. We searched sites like Smarbrief and their official websites; however, we only found demographic information aboutDean Foods, Daisy, and Muuna.
The most relevant piece of information was a marketing analysis made for Daisy, in 2014, which confirmed the brand's target towards millennials for the past five years. Through Dean Food's and Muuna, we confirmed the trend of the cottage cheese brands to make the product more appealing for the younger generations, millennials and generation Xers. To do so, they are focusing on health benefits and presentation. We also found that millennials and generation Xers considered cottage cheese a grandmas' food, but now are showing more interest in the product, thanks to its health benefits and practical presentation. Health and practicality are two of the younger generation trends for all foods.
Following this, we searched through global analysis made about the cottage industry to find comparisons of demographics between countries. While we found global reports, like the one made by Market Watch, the demographic information was hidden behind a paywall. As our last step, we looked for cheese market industry statistics to see if there was a breakdown by age generations and niche. However, we found that cheese industry reports often exclude cottage cheese due to its different preparation process.

Finally, we concluded that there are no public reports or analysis made about the demographics of the cottage cheese consumers in the US, or their consumption trends by age group in the past five years.
This could be caused by the niche structure of the industry. The demographics are available in the report made by Business Wire, through payment; however, there is no certainty that it includes consumer perceptions or a comparison of the past five years. With the information found, we were able to give general insights about the US market, brands' approach, and consumer perception trends from baby boomers, generation Xers, and millennials.
Part
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Part
05

Consumption Trends - Sour Cream

While there is no public information available to follow the consumption trends of sour cream across age groups, it was possible to identify certain key facts about the product like the fact that 235 million people in the United States eat it. Below is an outline of the research strategies used to better understand why the information requested is publicly unavailable, as well as a deep dive into the findings.

HELPFUL FINDINGS

  • Amongst people that use sour cream, creaminess is directly associated with consumer satisfaction. When assessing the creaminess of a product, consumers primarily rely on flavor and texture.
  • According to Statista, 235 million Americans use sour cream in 2019, compared to 91 million who don't.
  • Starting in 2012, researchers observed that consumers are increasingly desiring low-fat sour cream. Additionally, consumer demand is aimed towards milder sour cream flavors due to consumers’ dislike of "too sour" fermented product tastes.
  • According to a 2018 Mordor Intelligence market study, flavor combinations that included spicy, roasted, and other exotic flavors are among the most demanded.
  • Sour cream is mostly consumed with snacks as a dip, topping or mixed with other ingredients to use as a spread. Among the most preferred flavors for using as a spread are savory and spicy flavors.
  • Most prominently, sour cream is consumed as a topping to snacks, baked potatoes and bakery products.

RESEARCH STRATEGY

The research team was not able to provide US consumption statistics across all age groups for sour cream. We made this determination after an exhaustive effort attempting several strategies that are detailed below (in order to provide understanding as to why we deemed the information unavailable).

We began by researching databases such as Wiley Online Library, Google Scholar, and Statista to find studies that focus on consumer behavior surrounding sour cream in the past five years. This search determined available studies focus on factors that affect customer satisfaction surrounding sour cream or percentages of the US population who consume sour cream (Source 3); however, no studies focused on consumer behavior regarding consumption based on age. Next, we searched for surveys, hoping to find responses from consumers segmented by age. To hunt for these details, we searched consumer behavior survey databases such as the Bureau of Labor Statistics Consumer Expenditure survey, Simmons National Consumer Surveys, Mintel, Ipsos, McKinsey, and so on. This strategy failed because the available surveys did not specifically focus on consumer behavior surrounding sour cream; rather, the surveys focused on irrelevant topics such as consumer opinion towards sour cream packaging and the effects on the environment.

Our final strategy was to attempt to identify top US sour cream manufacturers and search their business reports, such as annual reports hoping to find information on consumer behavior by age. To identify the top US sour cream producers searched business reports from 2014-2018, hoping to find insights into the US consumer behavior surrounding the key players' sour cream products. This strategy ultimately failed because, in the business reports of each of the companies, no concrete comprehensive information regarding consumer trends (as they relate specifically to their sour cream product lines) was available. One company, Dean Foods mentioned possible consumer demand changes in the future, however, the changes were approximate predictions rather than concrete data. Also, the demand changes could be applied across all of their product lines rather than just sour cream, in particular, which is why the information was not relevant.
Part
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Part
06

Consumption Trends - Plant Based Milk

Generation Z are leading the trend towards plant-based milk. Unfortunately, insufficient information existed to provide a comprehensive overview of the consumption trends of plant-based milk across age ranges.

KEY FINDINGS

  • According to research, Generation Z consumes 550% more plant-based milk than Generation X.
  • A report by helixa indicates that plant-based milk reported the growth of 61 percent from 2012 to 2017.
  • According to plant based foods, the plant-based milk has grown 3.1 percent over the last year. The U.S. sales of almond milk reached $1 billion in 2014.
  • Almond milk sales have grown by 250% in the past five years.
  • The annual consumption range of macadamia nuts varies between 8,800 – 9,800 metric tons in the U.S and the country is known as the largest consumer.
  • Roughly 35.0% of people ages 20-29 consume nuts in the united states and likewise people ages 60 and above."Among men aged 20–39, 33.2% consumed nuts, while 40.0% of men aged 60 and over consumed nuts. Among women aged 20–39, 36.8% employed nuts, while 44.1% of women aged 60 and over consumed nuts."

RESEARCH STRATEGY

Despite an extensive search, our research team was unable to provide comprehensive data on Plant Based Milk consumption across age ranges. We employed three main research strategies which uncovered the information detailed above but were ultimately unable to provide consumption trends for all ages.
Firstly, we searched market research reports about the plant based milk industry, surveys and reports from cow and plant-based milk producer associations, US Department of Agriculture reports, and academic articles. We expected to gain useful information from this search because researches often gather data on age to ensure a lack of bias in their results, and marketers or industry organizations typically consider age a revealing consumer characteristic. While we did gather some vague trends about the influence of young people on the market, we failed to identify other trends.
Next, we broke down the category of "plant based milk" into various types such as almond, cashew, macadamia, pistachio, pecan, walnut, multi-nut blends, Soy, Oat milk, and other plant milks. From our search we found that, in the past five years, almond milk sales have grown by 250% in the united. We searched for information about consumer age trends by product and brand. While we were able to find consumer age data on nuts from 2009 to 2010, we did not find any recent consumption statistics. Furthermore, press releases and marketing reports tended to focus on consumer interests like sustainability and organic products over age when describing the target audience of these products.
Finally, we then tried to identify the information by triangulating the answer through calculations, which we looked for global consumption of plant based milk by age over the last five years. For this, we scoured through industry reports like Business Wire, Market Research, MarketsandMarkets, IBIS World, Mintel, Ipsos, Pew Research, among others. The idea here was to focus on the consumption of plant based milk by age across the globe and check for the US share in the market. We would have then used the same market share across the demographic metric to identify the consumption statistics across all age categories of plant based milk. However, all available reports focused on the market size, industry players, and trends, among others. Also, many reports like Business Wire, which highlighted the customer landscape among its contents were behind a paywall. As a result, we were unable to ascertain if they provide the required information, they may or may not hold the relevant insights.
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Part
07

Consumption Trends - High-Protein Milk

Young adults are leading the trend towards high-protein plant-based milk, while older adults are interested in high-protein milk as a preventative health measure. Unfortunately, insufficient information existed to provide a comprehensive overview of the consumption trends of high-protein milk across age ranges.

YOUNG ADULTS (18-24)

ADULTS (25-45)

  • Consumers between the ages of 25 and 44 represent the age range most popular with Ripple Foods, a manufacturer of high-protein pea milk.
  • Customers between the ages of 25 and 34 were the most popular consumer age range of Fairlife products.

OLDER ADULTS (over 64)

  • This generation is interested in high-protein milk products to combat the loss of muscle mass, and are more likely to consider protein from plant-based sources healthy than younger generations.

RESEARCH STRATEGY

Despite an extensive search, our research team was unable to provide comprehensive data on high-protein milk consumption across age ranges. We employed three main research strategies which uncovered the information detailed above but were ultimately unable to provide consumption trends for all ages.

First, we looked for a direct answer to the request. We searched market research reports about the high-protein milk industry, surveys and reports from cow and plant-based milk producer associations, US Department of Agriculture reports, and academic articles. We expected to gain useful information from this search because researches often gather data on age to ensure a lack of bias in their results, and marketers or industry organizations typically consider age a revealing consumer characteristic. While we did gather some vague trends about the influence of young people on the market, we failed to identify other trends.

Next, we broke down the category of "high-protein milk" into various products and brands. Milk with less fat, dry milk, ultra-filtered milk, and pea-based milk are among the kinds of milk with the highest-protein content. Ripple Foods and Bolthouse Farms are two major producers of plant-based protein milk and Organic Valley and Fairlife produce ultra-filtered milk. Based on this information, we searched for information about consumer age trends by product and brand. While we were able to find consumer age data on Ripple Foods, Fairlife, and Bolthouse Farms, we did not have success with the other brands because their product lines are so diverse that it was difficult to isolate the age of the consumers for the high-protein milk. Furthermore, press releases and marketing reports tended to focus on consumer interests like sustainability and organic products over age when describing the target audience of these products.

Last, we identified diets that encouraged the consumption of high-protein foods, like paleo, ketogenic, and Whole30. We also identified that people with cardiovascular problems were more likely to turn to high-protein products. Based on these motivations that would drive a consumer towards high-protein milk, we sought to triangulate an answer by using a different perspective. Because diets are a well-studied topic, we expected this search to reveal more information about consumption habits by age. While this strategy led us to some information about older generations' tendency to look to high-protein milk as a creative way to increase protein intake, it failed to uncover more comprehensive information.
Part
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Part
08

Consumption Trends - Lactose Free Milk

The global lactose-free milk segment is witnessing high growth rate with an increase of demand at a global scale.

HELPFUL FINDINGS

DEMOGRAPHICS

  • Lactose-Free Milk is popular among millennials and especially millennial parents who want their kids to consume lactose-free milk due to lactose intolerance.
  • People with lactose intolerance prefer lactose free milk as it contains lactose enzyme which digests the Lactose present in the milk.
  • Around 30 million American adults aged above 20 are lactose intolerant and is most prevalent in African, Asian, or Native Americans.
  • People aged 20-40 years experience lactose intolerance in the US.
  • In the case of whites, lactose intolerance starts at the age of 5 but in the case of African Americans, it starts from 2 years.

SALES/MARKET SIZE

  • In 2017, US lactose-free milk comprise sales of $923 million with 13% increase in growth rate.
  • In 2016, US lactose-free milk comprise sales of $820 million.
  • The global lactose-free dairy products market size is US$ 10,582.5 million by 2017 end and expected to grow US$ 17,809.4 Million by 2027 end with not further segmentation on lactose-free milk sales.
  • The global lactose-free milk segment is witnessing high growth rate with an increase of demand at a global scale.

YOUR RESEARCH TEAM APPLIED THE FOLLOWING STRATEGY

We began our research by looking for all the precompiled Information related to consumption trends of lactose-free milk across age ranges, focusing on the last 5 years, but we were not able to establish the trends.

Our first strategy was to search for information consumption statistics across all age categories of lactose-free milk in research reports such as Statista, NCBI, Research gate, foodstuffs, where most of the information is on U.S. lactose-free product sales and growth rate. We found some insights stating that lactose free milk is popular among millennials and millennial parents but no further stats age-wise or generation wise.

Our second strategy was to search for lactose-free milk market reports for details on segmentation of customer base across various market reports such as marketsandmarkets, marketwatch, euromonitor, futuremarketinsights and others and key players such as Nestle SA, Danone, Johnson and Johnson Valio, DSM, Liddells, Dean Foods, Unilever Dairy Farmers of America, Arla Foods, Organic Valley, Amul, Lactaid, Natrel, Parmalat, Meiji Dairies and we could locate a list of key players but could not locate any further reports stating customer segmentation by age since data was behind paid wall.

Our third strategy was to expand the scope of search and tried to deliver consumption statistics of lactose-free dairy products across all generations and various business reports such as businessinsider, futuremarketinsights, godairyfree, healthline, Statista and others, even beyond timeline of 24 months, but we could not locate consumption statistics of lactose-free dairy products age-wise to segment further on lactose-free milk as most of the information was on Revenue and growth rate.
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Part
09

Consumption Trends - Traditional Milk

Traditionalists and baby boomers spend the most on traditional dairy milk, averaging $7.12 and $3.44 per month respectively, as of 2014 when the most recent data is available. Millennials and Gen Xers spend significantly less, at $1.80 and $1.96 per month on average, which is partly attributed to their tendency to eat out at restaurants more and therefore eat at home less. Although more recent data for overall average traditional milk consumption is available, there are no more recent consumption statistics segmented by age category.

MILK AS PART OF FOOD SPENDING, BY GENERATION, 2014

  • The USDA’s Economic Research Service (ERS) published a report on food spending by age category in December 2017, based on 2014 data.
  • The USDA ERS report found that the average Millennial spent $1.80 per month on milk, Gen Xers spent $1.96 per month, Baby Boomers $3.44 and Traditionalists spent $7.12 when examining the "total monthly dollars spent per household by food category".
  • The USDA ERS report also found milk, as share of expenditure by food category, to be as follows: Millennial 1.70%, Gen X 1.74%, Baby Boomers 2.15% and Traditionalists 2.32%
  • The lower proportion of spending on milk is attributed to the younger consumers' tendency to "eat out more often".

ANNUAL MILK CONSUMPTION BY GENERATION, 2001

  • In 2003 Michael Hutjens, an agricultural university professor and dairy specialist, discussed US milk consumption for the most recent year for which statistics were available (2001) in the Illinois. Although this information is out-dated, the information provided by the relative consumption by each age group may still be relevant.
  • Average annual milk consumption by age group was noted as follows:
Children 12 and below 28 gallons
Teenagers 13-17 22 gallons
Adults 18-to-35 13 gallons
Adults 50-59 9 gallons

MILK CONSUMPTION BY CAPITA FROM 2013 TO 2017

  • The USDA ERS publishes data on the US dairy industry and market on an annual basis, including average milk consumption per capita.
  • The most recently published figures for milk which includes dairy milk with various fat content as well as "flavored, buttermilk, eggnog, and miscellaneous" are for 2017, so that the past 5 years average consumption per capita are as follows:
2013 165 lbs
2014 159 lbs
2015 156 lbs
2016 154 lbs
2017 149 lbs

US MILK CONSUMPTION DATA IN 2015 AND 2017

  • Mintel reported that 91% of Americans consumed traditional milk in 2015.
  • In 2015 57% of traditional milk consumers drank it by itself, 61% used traditional milk as an ingredient and 69% as an addition, for example, poured over cereal.
  • Although traditional milk consumption is on the decline with a 15% drop in consumption between 2012 and 2017, the consumption of whole milk is on the rise with an increase of 8% between 2012 and 2017.
  • The consumption of skim and low-fat milk has decreased more sharply than the traditional milk category as a whole, dropping 28% between 2012 and 2017. This is attributed Americans preferring "a more natural and holistic approach to nutrition".

RESEARCH STRATEGY

An extensive search by our research team did not identify any traditional milk consumption statistics across age categories for the last 5 years. We used three main research strategies which gave us older consumption statistics and some insights into the traditional milk market overall, however up-to-date traditional milk consumption data freely available was lacking. Mintel have published a report on the dairy and non-dairy market, available for purchase, which is likely to provide the requested information.

We first searched for a direct answer to how much milk is consumed by age category, which included review of market research reports on traditional milk and dairy products, media articles, academic articles and government data published by the US Department of Agriculture reports. This provided overall consumption of milk published by the USDA for the five years up to 2017, however the breakdown by age was not available.

Expanding this search past the last five years uncovered an article published by Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer & Environmental Sciences which did provide milk consumption by age group, however dated back to 2003. We used this lead however to search further on the expert quoted in the article, Michael Hutjens, and June Dairy Month which was the reason for the focus on dairy consumption however no additional, updated information had been released since.

Lastly, we considered the purchase of milk as opposed to the consumption of milk. An article published in AG Web noted that the millennial generation’s habit to eat out more rather than at home was negatively impacting milk sales. We found further details about spending on milk, as a dollar amount and as a proportion of food spending, in an article published by Hoard’s Dairyman which drew its data from a report published by the USDA ERS. Unfortunately when we reviewed this report we found this data, published in 2017, related to 2014 only.


Part
10
of ten
Part
10

Consumption Trends - Heavy Whipping Cream (A)

Heavy whipping cream consumption trends across generations or age groups in the United States do not appear to be available in the public domain, as heavy whipping cream is a niche product category and most generational consumption trends or statistics in the public domain focus on the broader dairy market. Though it contains more calories compared to other creams, heavy whipping cream is preferred in the creation of dips, sauces, soups, and whipped cream. Compared to other generations, Millennials and Gen Zers particularly find dips and sauces appealing.

FINDINGS

  • Heavy whipping cream and heavy cream are the same product, according to the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA). In contrast to light whipping cream, it has higher milkfat content. Heavy whipping cream has at least 36% milkfat, while light whipping cream has 30% to below 36% milkfat.
  • The report on heavy cream that Maia Research has recently published provides the historical and projected consumption of heavy cream in North America from 2013 to 2023. The consumption statistics, however, are not segmented by age group and are behind a paywall.
  • The report on whipping cream that HTF Market Intelligence has recently published provides the volume sales of full fat (heavy) whipping cream in the United States from 2014 to 2019, but these sales are not broken down by age group and are behind a paywall.
  • There are several ongoing trends that drive growth in the global whipping cream market, according to market research firm Technavio. Among these trends are the growing number of coffee shops or cafés, the growing consumption of organic whipping cream, the rise of private label brands, the rise of flavored or innovative whipping creams, the launch of new whipping creams, the expansion of the retail landscape, and the growing consumption of foods topped with whipped cream or foods thickened with whipping cream (e.g., soups and sauces). Because of these trends, the global whipping cream market is expected to grow at a CAGR of 4% during the period 2019-2023.
  • Whipped cream, whether derived from light or heavy whipping cream, is commonly used in the beverages that cafés offer. Typically used as a topping, it has applications in coffees, iced teas, milkshakes, chocolate beverages. pastries, waffles, scones, and cupcakes. The varying preferences and tastes of consumers when it comes to premium coffee are, in part, driving demand for whipping cream.
  • Demand for organic whipping cream is growing, owing to consumers' increased interest in organic products. Consumers, especially those in developed countries such as the United States, are limiting their intake of food and beverages that were at some point exposed to chemical fertilizers and pesticides.
  • Organic Valley, Humboldt Creamery, and Horizon Organic are examples of companies in the United States that offer consumers organic heavy whipping cream.
  • Flavored whipped creams, featuring flavors such as chocolate, vanilla, coffee, cinnamon, rose, orange, and kahlua, are emerging.
  • According to Amanda Agee, Cook's Illustrated's editorial director, heavy whipping cream is preferred in the creation of soups, sauces/dips, and whipped cream. Soups and sauces made with heavy whipping cream have a more luxurious flavor and feel, while whipped cream made with heavy whipping cream holds its shape longer. Agee says heavy cream is worth using despite the calories it adds to a dish.
  • There are sources indicating that Millennials and Gen Zers are fond of dips and sauces.

RESEARCH STRATEGY

In finding trends surrounding the consumption of heavy whipping cream across generations or age ranges in the United States, we employed a number of strategies. First, we checked if there are industry reports, news articles, or surveys that readily provide the information. We took heavy whipping cream to mean the same as heavy cream because according to the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA), heavy whipping cream and heavy cream are the same product. Heavy whipping cream or heavy cream contains at least 36% milkfat. Light whipping cream, in contrast, contains at least 30% but less than 36% milkfat. After an extensive search, it appears that only one market research firm, Maia Research, has published a report on heavy cream. The report is both paywalled and global in scope, but its table of contents shows that it provides the historical and projected consumption of heavy cream in North America from 2013 to 2023. Its unclear from the table of contents if statistics specific to the United States are available in this report. We were unable to find any news article or survey that covers the consumption of heavy whipping cream or heavy cream, let alone consumption across age groups.

Mordor Intelligence, HTF Market Intelligence, Technavio, and Grand View Research have all published reports on whipping cream, the broader market covering both light and heavy whipping cream. Some of these reports offer insights into trends that drive growth in the whipping cream market, but the insights are not segmented by generation. The table of contents of HTF Market Intelligence's report shows that the paywalled report provides the volume sales of full fat (heavy) whipping cream in the United States from 2014 to 2019, but these sales are not broken down by age group.

Though Maia Research's report is paywalled, it offers information on the top players in the market. For our second strategy and to gather clues about the consumption of heavy whipping cream, we looked into what key players are launching in the United States and how these players are marketing their products to target audiences (e.g., Millennials, Boomers). Based on Maia Research's report, the major players in the market are Anchor, Bulla, Dairy Farmers, Emborg, President, Galbani, Elle & Vire, Fonterra, Oldenburger, and Arla. Both press releases and media coverage were examined for insights into heavy whipping cream consumption trends. Surprisingly, however, no relevant information was found. We were unable to find any source detailing recent heavy whipping cream product launches or marketing campaigns.

Since our second strategy was ineffective, we changed tactics and proceeded to research where or when heavy whipping cream is used. We figured we could look into how the consumption of foods that use heavy whipping cream varies across generations. According to an article published by Today, "the more fat you have in a cream, the more you can do with it." This means heavy whipping cream has more applications compared to other creams. Heavy whipping cream is preferred when making soups and sauces that contain acidic ingredients because the odds of heavy whipping cream curdling is lower and heavy whipping cream imparts more luxurious flavors and texture. It is preferred as well when making whipped cream because it enables the whipped cream to hold its shape longer. When we researched how the consumption of soups, sauces, and whipped cream varies across generations, however, the only thing we learned was that compared to other generations, Millennials and Gen Zers particularly enjoy dips and sauces.

All in all, there is very limited information on the subject, and this may be due to the fact that heavy whipping cream is a niche product category. It may be better to look at the broader dairy market for generational or age-related consumption trends.
Sources
Sources

From Part 01
Quotes
  • "This is especially true for millennials, who have traditionally skewed their consumption to foodservice. As these 75 million millennials become parents and enter their prime ice cream consumption years, the trend to at home enjoyment is quickly shifting"
  • "The downward trend in foodservice growth since 2016 (with restaurant closures now occurring faster than during any prior year post-recession) opens up new possibilities for putting more ice cream into shopper baskets more often."
Quotes
  • "Ice cream and frozen dessert sales have hovered near $27 billion for the past several years. The foodservice market has a slightly larger share of the total U.S. ice cream and frozen dessert market, comprising more than 55 percent.""
From Part 04
Quotes
  • "Staying relevant with our consumers drives innovation at Dean Foods. There are demographic, cultural and culinary shifts that are changing consumption and purchase behaviors, and we need to innovate and deliver the right solutions to meet those ever-changing needs."
From Part 05
Quotes
  • "Many of our customers, such as supermarkets, warehouse clubs and food distributors, have consolidated. This consolidation may continue. These consolidations have produced large, more sophisticated customers with increased buying power and negotiating strength, who may seek lower prices or more favorable terms, and they have increased our dependence on key large-format retailers and discount supermarket retailers. In addition, some of these customers are vertically integrated and have re-dedicated key shelf-space that was formerly occupied by our branded products for their private label products"
Quotes
  • "Consumers’ desire for decreasing dietary fat content has created a market for low-fat sour cream. Among these products, reduced-fat, light (at least 25% or 50% fat reduction), and nonfat are common, in part due to FDA’s labeling requirements for reduced-fat products (21 CFR 101). Sales data over the past 25 years for the U.S. market (USDA 2010) are illustrated in Figure 13.1. The trend clearly shows increased sales. In 2009, nearly 400 kg × 106 of sour cream was sold. Per capita sales of sour cream and dips was 1.88 kg. In comparison, per capita sales for yogurt was 5.661 kg (USDA 2010)."
  • "However, the trend for cul-tured dairy products is toward a milder avor (Barnes et al. 1991) in part due to consumers’ dislike of “too sour” fermented products (Thompson et al. 2007). Reduced acidity permits the sensation of aromatic compounds produced by lactic acid cultures. Lindsay et al. (1967) found that important avor compounds in sour cream include diacetyl, acetic acid, acetaldehyde, and dimethyl sulde. All aroma compounds are associated with mesophilic heterofermentative starter culture metabolism (Vasiljevic and Shah 2008). Sour cream is highly viscous and should be smooth and free of particulate matter. As for appearance, a homogeneous, glossy surface is preferred, and no whey separation should be visible in the container (Costello 2008)"
Quotes
  • "Consumers are demanding various flavors, such as spicy, roasted, exotic combinations in sour cream. Brands, such as Heluva Good! Launched sour cream Beer-Battered Onion Ring dip, which is made with fried sweet yellow onions, lager, and sour cream. Sour cream are mostly consumed with snacks as dip, toppings or mixed with other ingredients to use as a spread. Savory and spice are the most preferred flavor by consumers as it combines perfect with salty snacks."
Quotes
  • "Sour cream is mostly consumed as toppings on snacks, baked potatoes, and bakery products. Flexible packaging allows consumer to pour cream easily. "
From Part 08
Quotes
  • "US sales of lactose-free milk grew an impressive 13%"
  • "It’s largely Millennials who are driving the increase in consumer interest in lactose-free milks, especially Millennial parents, who understand that milk is nutritious and want their kids to have the taste and nutrition of real dairy."
Quotes
  • "Lactose intolerance is very common in adults. It is rarely dangerous. About 30 million American adults have some degree of lactose intolerance by age 20."
  • "In white people, lactose intolerance often develops in children older than age 5. This is the age when our bodies may stop making lactase. In African Americans, the problem can occur as early as age 2. The condition is very common among adults with Asian, African, or Native American heritage."
Quotes
  • "Among adults, the age of presentation of lactose intolerance is 20-40 years. [7, 12]"
  • "Persons of all races are affected by lactose intolerance, with a higher prevalence among Asian, African, and South American persons."
Quotes
  • "Lactose-free milk is easier to digest for people with lactose intolerance because it contains lactase, the enzyme used to break down lactose. "