Daily COVID-19 Scams (April 2)

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Daily COVID-19 Scams (April 2)

In the attached spreadsheet please find a number of updates on COVID-19 themed scams affecting the United States. These include scams aimed at detriment of the finances, privacy and health of citizens and businesses. These are outlined below.

COVID-19 SCAMS (ROWS 48-59)

  • Virus: Macro-laden excel file that downloads a malicious program when opened.
  • Misinformation: National Quarantine warning instigated by state entity to sow fear and unrest.
  • Testing: Scammers are contacting people in New York City about setting up a time to get tested for the virus. The city says it is not doing this.
  • Product to Treat or Cure COVID-19: Robocalling is targeting higher risk individuals with diabetes, offering a free COVID-19 testing kit along with a free diabetic monitor.
  • Product to Treat or Cure COVID-19: Robocalling is preying on virus fears to sell non-existent health insurance coverage.
  • Financial Support: Robocalling is targeting small businesses claiming to offer virus-related funding or loans.
  • Virus: Phishing scam that claims to provide guidance against scammers but installs a banking Trojan virus.
  • Testing: Residents in Michigan are being contacted by scammers posing as local health officials while calling people to offer coronavirus testing and treatment. The attorney general’s office said the scam has been used as a ploy to gain access to people’s personal Medicaid or Medicare information.
  • Phishing: Users are invited to complete a survey which promises a free Netflix subscription. After doing so they are required to pass on the message to 10 others via Whatsapp or Twitter. The activation process is just a ruse that ensures the scam reaches as wide an audience as possible, enabling fraudsters to trick more people into submitting their personal details or installing malware.
  • Testing: Law enforcement agencies in South Florida have issued alerts about people dressed in white lab coats and masks impersonating U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention workers. The people are reportedly knocking on home doors and offering free COVID-19 tests.
  • Virus: Johns Hopkins University has learned about the existence of malware designed to look like the university’s coronavirus tracking map in an effort to steal information from users who visit the fake site. The malicious application requires users to download software or launch the fake map, which opens the malware.
  • Phishing: Screen Actors' Guild has become aware of a scam that uses the COVID-19 pandemic to solicit nude audition videos and passport information for a fake fashion show in Paris via fake casting notices.
Sources
Sources