Daily COVID-19 Scams (April 10)

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Daily COVID-19 Scams (April 10)

There continue to be numerous scams associated with COVID-19. Examples of these include fake Kentucky Lottery prizes, a scam targeting seniors seeking U.S. Global Fund grant assistance, several companies selling medical products for COVID-19 but never shipping the items, a dog breeder charging for COVID-19 crates, and a convenience store owner selling shoddy face masks. Details about these scams are provided in the attached spreadsheet.

Scams Related to COVID-19

  • Officials from the Kentucky Lottery Commission report that there have been numerous scams associated with the lottery since COVID-19 has swept the country. The scams take advantage of Americans who are struggling financially due to virus-related layoffs. Individuals are promised a cash prize if they provide a bank account or mail in gift cards to prepay the taxes on their winnings. The scammers then pocket the gift cards and/or steal money from the victim's bank account.
  • The Better Business Bureau reports that an individual in Tennessee received a private Facebook message from a friend who had been hacked. The message contained the good news that her supposed friend had received $100,000 from the U.S. Global Fund Grant created to assist U.S. seniors. The scam victim then contacted the officer's name provided and was told immediately that she was eligible. She was then asked to provide additional private information.
  • According to the Better Business Bureau, Leafy Clover is marketing a low-quality mask on Facebook. The mask takes weeks to arrive and is made of a flimsy, cheap material, rather than the high-quality product promised.
  • Medical-Protector.com secures payment for face masks but never ships the product to the purchasers. The Better Business Bureau has received numerous complaints about this company. The company continues to claim that product is in stock.
  • Enstadia promises full protection masks with free shipping in the U.S. Buyers pay additional fees for expedited shipping, but they never receive the masks. Repeated attempts to contact the company are futile. This company has been flagged by the Better Business Bureau.
  • A dachshund breeder with a lengthy history of scamming dog lovers has recently used the COVID-19 pandemic to develop a new scam. According to the Better Business Bureau scam tracker, the breeders demand an additional $770 for a special transport crate that is designed to protect against the pandemic. The dog and crate never arrive.
  • EM General offers face masks at a discount for healthcare workers. Tracking systems produce no information and the masks are never received. The Better Business Bureau has received numerous complaints that refunds are not issued and communication with the company is impossible.
  • Heavezt sells a variety of COVID-19 medical supplies. Consumers purchase items but nothing is received. When the items do not arrive, communication via email, telephone, or web chat fails. This company has been flagged by the Better Business Bureau.
  • An owner of a BP Flexxmart convenience store in Michigan is scamming customers by selling cheaply made face masks for exorbitant prices. The Better Business Bureau has listed the scam on its website.
  • The Better Business Bureau has received numerous complaints about Bestdangstuff, a company selling a variety of COVID-19 products. Despite receiving payment, the company never ships the items ordered. The email address and contact information for the company changes repeatedly.
  • Nero Barrier processed payments for face masks but they were never received by the consumers. The website has now disappeared and the store has been listed as a scam on the Better Business Bureau scam tracker.
  • When consumers contact Stability Pro about their missing "COVID-19 necessities," they receive an auto-generated reply with no information. Consumers have reported to the Better Business Bureau that the items never arrive despite the consumers being charged for them.
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