Purchasing Habits of Pregnant Consumers

Part
01
of seven
Part
01

Pregnant Customers Customer journey

There are no reports in the public domain that offer insights into how pregnant women go through the sales process for nausea products or belly balms. However, information related to how pregnant women go about buying products and marketing tactics that attract them to a product's sales process is available, along with the most used channels for nausea products and belly balm brands to attract potential customers.

Helpful Marketing Tactics to Attract Pregnant Women into a Sales Process

  • Modern pregnant women in the US ask many questions and purchase a notable amount of baby gear. This fact indicates that brands can fill the needs of pregnant women and introduce them into their sales process by making reliable information about their products readily available.
  • According to Belo Media Group's report, about 90% of new moms in the United States are millennials who have a lot of pregnancy-related questions during their pregnancy period. The writer of this report explained that search engines are significant avenues to provide information about a product targeted towards pregnant women in the US, highlighting that during her pregnancy, she sourced different information through Google search.
  • Furthermore, the reporter observed that the site, which provided the most valuable information, became a reliable resource, noting that one website that did that significantly was Babylist. This information indicates that pregnant women start their purchase process by looking for information online out of curiosity, revealing how brands can lure them into their sales processes.
  • The second most significant place pregnant women in the US turn to for information is other moms, as per Belo Media Group's report, which observed that they usually ask each other for product recommendations. The report showed that incentivizing existing customers is a reliable way to introduce new customers to the sales process of products targeted at pregnant women.
  • The writer of Bello Group's report narrated the path she took to purchase a product during pregnancy. It went from learning about a product using an app (Babycenter, The Bump, or What to Expect), searching Pinterest for options, following links on Pinterest to read about the product, narrowing product options down to design or price, and checking Instagram in search of products promoted by relevant influencers.
  • According to a report by Chron, there are four significant ways to utilize marketing to draw pregnant women into a product's sales process. They include using beautiful product images, promoting the comfort a product offers, targeting husbands, and using nesting instincts (the urge to have everything in order before their baby's arrival).
  • In addition to the four ways to market to pregnant women reported by Chron, Pregnancy Magazine's report added that brands need to represent diversity when marketing to pregnant women.

Research Findings Relevant to How People Find Nausea Products and Belly balms

Research Strategy:

The research team began by investigating relevant media websites, as well as those that publish pregnancy-related information in the US, including Refinery29, Forbes, Baby Center, Babylist, and others. Here, we hoped to find reports with insights into how pregnant consumers go through the sales process of nausea products and belly balms. Unfortunately, such information was not available in any report in the public domain. Instead, we located reports by The Pregnancy Prep, What to Expect, Mama Natural, and others, listing significant nausea products and belly balms in the US, but there was no data on the journeys pregnant customers took to buy these products.

Next, we investigated the directories of some nausea products and belly balms observed to be among the most significant in the US, hoping to find information relevant to the customer journeys of each product used to acquire pregnant customers. For this, we examined the directories of nausea products such as Three Lollies Preggie Pop Drops, Tummydrops Ginger, Ritual Prenatal, and others, as well as belly balms products, including The Honest Co. Organic Belly Balm, Burt’s Bees Mama Bee Belly Butter Kit, etc. Still, there was no information relevant to the customer journey pregnant customers used to go through the sales process of these brands. Also, we leveraged the site analysis portal SimilarWeb to examine the traffic sources of these brands, looking for any data relevant to the sales process consumers go through. Again, the needed information was not available, as this investigation only provided data on how visitors came to their sites.

As a third strategy, we expanded the investigation in search of information on the sales process companies generally used to sell products to pregnant women in the US. Unfortunately, this research only produced publications with insights into how to market products to pregnant women in the United States, as per reports by Belo Media Group, Chron, Pregnancy Magazine, and others. Hence, due to lack of information specific to pregnant customers' journeys for nausea products or belly balms, we provided information on how brands generally market products to pregnant women as it indicated how to attract them to a product's sales process, as a proxy for the needed information.

Furthermore, we proceeded to investigate studies by relevant research and health organizations in the US pertinent to pregnant women, looking for any data on how pregnant consumers go through the sales process of nausea products, belly balms, or any other item. For this, we researched portals like Globe Newswire, the CDC, Healthline, etc. This investigation revealed health issues related to pregnant women, the most significant blogs for pregnant women, etc. Again, there was no information related to pregnant customers' journey mentioned.

Part
02
of seven
Part
02

Purchase Drivers for Nausea Products

77% of pregnant women tend to purchase OTC products such as nausea products solely relying on doctors recommendation. 70% of pregnant women tend to purchase OTC products such as nausea products based on Facebook buzz, as 29% of the moms liked 21 or more Facebook brands.

Helpful Findings

  • 77% of pregnant women tend to purchase OTC products such as nausea products by solely relying on "doctors recommendation".
  • 70% of pregnant women tend to purchase OTC products such as nausea products based on Facebook Buzz as 29% of the moms liked around 21 or more Facebook brands.
  • Nausea and vomiting of pregnancy affect nearly 75% of pregnant women.
  • Best products to subside with pregnancy nausea and morning sickness are Three Lollies Preggie Pop Drops, Tummydrops Ginger, Earth Mama Angel Baby Morning Wellness Tea, B-natal Vitamin Supplement Lollipops, Pink Stork Mist Magnesium Spray, Sea-Band Mama Anti-Nausea Wrist Band, and Psi Bands Acupressure Wrist Bands.

Research Strategy

Information on 3-5 purchase drivers for pregnant women when buying nausea products is not available in the public domain. Only two drivers such as doctor's recommendation and Facebook buzz are derived as primary drivers for purchasing nausea products after triangulating the information from the New Mom Shopping Survey of OCT products.

Initially, we scoured through various research articles, journal and survey reports from sources such as Neilsonreports, Persuadables, NCBI, Science Direct, Sagepub and others for information on purchase drivers for pregnant women when buying nausea products and could locate most of the information on some of the best nausea products for pregnant women but nothing specific to purchase drivers. Next, we searched for information on pregnant women buying habits, shopping behavior concerning medication. The idea was to triangulate the nausea products purchase drivers in pregnant women by searching through blogs, medical associations, maternity articles such as the American Academy of Family Physicians, Rlacollective, Bestpractice.bmj, Familydoctor.org. After an extensive search, we found that 77% of pregnant women tend to purchase OTC products by solely relying on "doctors recommendation" and 70% of pregnant women tend to purchase OTC products based on Facebook buzz as 29% of the moms liked around 21 or more Facebook brands. We also found that nausea products come under the category of OTC drugs, so based on these two facts, doctors recommendation and Facebook buzz are primary purchase drivers for pregnant women when buying nausea products.

To find 1-3 more purchase drivers for pregnant women when buying nausea products, we tried looking at nausea products marketing strategies to attract pregnant women and also any mention of purchase drivers in nausea market reports in various sources such as Market Watch, IBISWorld, Globaldata, Forbes, Belomediagroup, Jitha, among others. From the mentioned sources, we found the marketing strategies concerning maternity wear and some general insights on market size of antiemetics but no information on the purchase drivers for pregnant women when buying nausea products

We expanded the scope of the search to North America and further to global-scale by looking at North America and worldwide survey and market reports on nausea products with an idea to triangulate the derived information to the U.S. Still, we could not locate any purchase drivers for pregnant women. Even after expanding the scope of search beyond the timeline of 24 months using the strategies mentioned above, we could not locate information on 3-5 purchase drivers for pregnant women when buying nausea products.






Part
03
of seven
Part
03

Purchase Drivers for Belly Balms

The end-use application for belly butters in 2019 is classified as stretch marks preventing, soothing, stretch marks removing, and others. The top five key players or manufacturers in the belly butter market include Lilah James, Badger, Nine Naturals, Burt's Bees, and Palmers.

RELEVANT INSIGHTS

  • Belly butter is classified as oil, cream, lotion, butter, bar, and others.
  • The key players in the belly butter market include Lilah James, Badger, Nine Naturals, Burt’s Bees, Inc., Palmer’s, The Honest Company, BELLA B, Earth Mama, Mambino Organics, Body Merry, Motherlove, Fairhaven Health, and Erbaviva.
  • According to DigitalJournal, people are becoming more health-conscious and this is increasing the demand for belly butters and in turn, is impacting the entire industry.
  • The key regions of belly butters market include the United States, China, Europe, and Japan.
  • The usage of belly butters is bifurcated as stretch marks preventing, soothing, stretch marks removing, and others.

PAYWALLED REPORTS

All the paywalled reports provided below contain all-inclusive information about the belly butters market including a deep analysis of the advanced trends, market status, market size, industry or market drivers, scope of the regional market, sales and revenue based on region, analysis of manufacturing cost, and market effect factors, industrial chain, upcoming technologies, regulatory policies, challenges, manufacturer's strategies, etc.
  • The link to the paywalled report on BusinessDailyMirror is here.
  • The link to the paywalled report on MarketWatch is here.
  • The link to the paywalled report on Fox34 is here.
  • The link to the paywalled report on OrbisResearch is here.
  • The link to the paywalled report on OnlineNewsGuru is here
  • The link to the paywalled report on PRNewsGazette is here.
  • The link to the paywalled report on AcuteMarketReports is here.
  • The link to the paywalled report on DigitalJournal is here.

RESEARCH STRATEGY

Despite a comprehensive search, we were unable to identify the purchase drivers that prompt pregnant women to buy belly balms in the United States. We deployed the following research strategies to identify the required data.
We began our search by examining market research reports on BusinessDailyMirror, PRNewsGazette, Fox34, MarketWatch, AlliedMarketResearch, OrbisResearch, AcuteMarketReports, and other similar sources. We came across a lot of extensive reports about belly butters, however, all of them were behind a paywall. The snippets provided on the reports were not enough to create an authentic research brief. Nevertheless, some of the relevant insights that we found on the reports are included in the brief. Also, links to paywalled all-inclusive research reports have been provided.
Subsequently, we proceeded to check media sources and blogs to learn more about the belly butter market and find leads about the purchase drivers specific to pregnant women. However, every single one of the articles that we came across only talked about the 'top belly butters in the market'. These articles are mostly promotional in nature. The majority of these articles are from influencers and the rest were from belly butter sellers, promoting their own products.
Next, we prepared a list of top five belly butter sellers in the market. Since data specific to the US market is scarce in the public domain, we expanded the scope of the research to a global level. We used the previously identified market research reports to identify the top players. According to MarketWatch, BusinessDailyMirror, Kvoo, Fox34, and many other market reports, Lilah James, Badger, Nine Naturals, Burt's Bees, and Palmers are the top five manufacturers or players in the belly butter market. After identifying the key players, we proceeded to check their official websites. Press releases and financial statements of companies sometimes reveal the factors behind their success. We believed that information can be used to find the purchase drivers. However, not all the key players had a dedicated section for press releases or financial statements. Also, the ones with a dedicated section for press releases or financial statements did not reveal any substantial data.
Based on preliminary research and what we across in the public domain, influencers play a vital role in the purchase of belly butters. There are tons of articles promoting belly butters from various brands and their impact on stretch marks. This could be a purchase driver for pregnant women to buy belly butters. Additionally, DigitalJournal states that people are becoming more health-conscious and this is increasing the demand for belly butters and in turn, is impacting the entire industry. Also, the majority of the market research reports concerning belly butters were released in 2019. This could mean that belly butters have just started to thrive and explains why there is not enough data in the public domain. To conclude, information regarding the purchase drivers for pregnant women when buying belly balms is non-existent in the public domain. And, there is not enough data available to triangulate the required information.
Part
04
of seven
Part
04

Top Influencers for Pregnant Consumers

The 7 major influencers for pregnant consumers include Genevieve Howland, Aspyn Ovard, January Harshe, Sarah Stage, Melisa Lawrence, Sia Cooper, and Gabe Flowers.

1. Genevieve Howland

2. Aspyn Ovard

3. January Harshe

  • January Harshe is an author and blogger who supports women's freedom of birth options. She created a Facebook page called Birth Without Fear and a blog by the same name as an outlet for her passion to help expectant women by providing tips and information regarding the journey of womanhood, pregnancy, birth, and motherhood.
  • She mainly uses social media handle Birth Without Fear.
  • Her Facebook page, Birth Without Fear, has 395k likes and 385k followers.
  • Her Instagram account has 280k followers.

4. Sarah Stage

  • A model and fitness trainer, Sarah Stage gained attention on social media upon her pregnancy. She created a blog that shares her journey through pregnancy and motherhood and released her own fitness and nutrition guide for pregnant women.
  • She uses her own name as her social media handle.
  • Sarah Stage's Instagram account has 2.1 million followers.
  • Her YouTube account has 15.8k subscribers.

5. Melissa Lawrence

6. Sia Cooper

7. Gabbie Flowers

  • Gabrielle Gabe Flowers is the other half of famous YouTube stars GabeBabe which documents their day-to-day lives on YouTube and offers motherhood advice, pregnancy tips, and perspectives on being an interracial family. Many of their videos are dedicated to stories about their kids and what to do during pregnancy.
  • Gabe uses social handles GabeBabe on YouTube and gabeflowers on Instagram.
  • GabeBabe’s YouTube account has a total of 340k subscribers.
  • Gabe’s Instagram account has 106k followers.

Research Strategy:

We commenced our research by looking into industry reports and media news articles to find 7-10 top influencers. There was however no precompiled data that ranked influencers of pregnant consumers. We then looked into lists of top bloggers, authors, gurus, writers, and speakers covering pregnancy, infants, childbirths and postpartum information since these topics sparked interest in pregnant consumers. Many of our findings pertained to parenting influencers which tackles only a bit about pregnancy which restricted us in providing 10 examples. We filtered our list and parameters to find influencers that covered the topics mentioned as their category or major topics. From this strategy, we found 7 top influencers who matched the requested criteria and checked that they endorse, review, sell and accept product placements to show that they are indeed influencers or have the ability to influence pregnant consumers. The inclusion of these influencers at the top is based on their large social media followings across various platforms. While there was no precompiled ranking available, the limited available information presumably put these people as some major influencers for pregnant consumers.
Part
05
of seven
Part
05

Change During Pregnancy

Expectant mothers are less likely to mind the price when shopping; however, price becomes a bigger factor once the baby is born. Expectant mothers also tend to buy the same brand, while new moms try to experiment with other brands to suit the family’s budget. Detailed below is more information on the development of pregnant consumers’ views during pregnancy and after delivery.

Prices

  • Thirty-nine percent of newly expecting mothers do not mind the price when buying items they want, and this percentage gradually goes down to 36% during the middle to the late-term of the pregnancy. Once the baby is born, price becomes a bigger factor to consider when shopping as only 25% of the new moms do not mind the prices.

Brand Loyalty

  • When it comes to brand loyalty, new moms are more likely to try new brands as they look for new products that will work well with the family's budget. On the other hand, around 40% of expectant mothers prefer to buy the same brand.

Online Groups

  • About 40% of new moms are more likely to be a member of an online parenting and buy-and-sell groups, while only 28% of expectant mothers are members of the said online groups.

Social Media

  • New moms are more likely to use Facebook on a daily basis. They use the app for in-depth discussions with family, friends, and group members.
  • Fifty percent of the expectant mothers surveyed said they are likely to use Facebook to get recommendations on products and services from family and friends, and this percentage goes as high as 73% among new moms.
  • In the early stage of the pregnancy, expectant mothers turn to social media to look for topics and products related to parenting. After the pregnancy, they turn to social media again, but this time, it’s for baby-related products and services.
  • Thirty-seven percent of newly expecting mothers say social media is their preferred source of information for products and services for their babies. During the middle to the late terms of the pregnancy, 42% prefer social media as their source of information for anything related to babies. This percentage even goes higher once the baby is born, with 46% new moms turning to social media for baby-related products and services.
Part
06
of seven
Part
06

Pregnant Consumers: Demographics

The average age of women consumers having their first child in the United States is 29.6. Women who have graduate or professional degrees make up the largest percentage of pregnant women in the US. Below you will find more demographics relating to pregnant women in the United States.

Age

  • According to the CDC, the mean age of women when they have their first child is 29.6.
  • The average age for a first pregnancy is higher than what it used to be. It used to be 22.7 in the 1980s.
  • The average age of pregnant women who have college degrees is 30.3 years.
  • In 2017, the number of births to mothers aged 15 to 19 was 194,377. According to the CDC, 18.8 out of every 1,000 live births in the US were to teen mothers.

Race/Ethnicity

  • This graph shows the ethnic group of birth mothers in the United States. The number of births are per 1,000 women. 67 were Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, 59 were Native American, 55 were "other", 55 were Hispanic or Latino, 54 were African American, 51 were Caucasian, and 50 were Asian. This graph can also be viewed in this document.

Marital Status

  • The number of live births to unmarried women in 2017 was 1,533,901. This correlates to 39.8% of all births.

Income

  • According to this graph, of the number of births per 1,000 women in the US, 66 were to mothers with an annual household income of under $10,000, 60 to mothers with an annual income of $25,000 to $35,000, and 51 to mothers with an annual income of $75,000 to $99,000. The graph can also be viewed here.

Education

  • According to this graph, of the number of births per 1,000 women in the US, 36 were born to women who did not graduate high school, 58 to women who graduated from high school (or received a GED), 50 to women who had some college or an Associate's degree, 54 to women who had a Bachelor's degree, and 62 to women who had a graduate or professional degree. The graph can also be viewed here.

Research Strategy

While we were able to find all the requested demographics for pregnant women in the United States, the data found almost always related to live births instead of pregnancies. We searched for all demographics related specifically to pregnancies on government websites such as the census pages, CDC records, and on data sites such as Statista. We did not find much information that measured demographics by pregnancy instead of by live birth. This could be because it is much easier to track live births than it is pregnancies, many of which may be unreported for various reasons, especially if the pregnancy is lost. Because of the lack of data measured by pregnancy, we have substituted live birth rate data.

We also could not find any data that was more recent than 2017. We checked government sources as well as statistics databases and found that 2017 is the most recent data available.
Part
07
of seven
Part
07

Pregnant Consumers: Psychographics

The main source of information and support for American pregnant women is the internet (99%), especially social media (89%). Their spending patterns are likely to change during pregnancy since it is the time when household expenses are checked to figure out where to make cuts. Their purchasing habits change based on considerations for upcoming spending for things like consultations, medications, delivery expenses, and the baby's soon-to-be daily necessities and changing needs.

How Pregnant Women Spend Their Time

  • In research published by BMC, it was stated that women with higher leisure-time physical activities have the lowest rates of adverse pregnancy and complications.
  • Additionally, while some pregnant women do not have sufficient time to spend with health professionals, they spend time using digital media like pregnancy apps to have their questions answered.

Sources of Information

  • In a survey result among pregnant women in the US released in 2018, it was found that their main source of information and social support are: from their current partner (92%), from the internet in general 99%, wherein, 89% use social media sites for questions and advice, 84% seek information from their social media friends and from social support, and 43% use blogs to communicate with other mothers.
  • Google searches were considered the most common way to seek information in the US, especially during pregnancy's early stage, because it is easy and instant.
  • The wide use of the internet, especially social media is due to its ease of access, having more information, and having the ability to look for women with the same situation.
  • The achieved information helps these women reduce their fears and concerns, reduce anxiety, gain encouragement and positive energy, and achieve virtual support from others.
  • Support groups are also used to make connections with similarly expecting parents, wherein they can get support from each other.
  • In another 2018 survey, 11% of pregnant women stated that their opinion has changed because of what they saw on social media.

Habits

  • When it comes to eating habits, dietary changes are seen among pregnant women in the US, based on a study published by NCBI.
  • 50% of the pregnant women interviewed increased their milk consumption, 26% had a dislike of meats, and 36% craved for sweet foods.
  • The top reason for decreasing or eliminating certain food intake (like alcohol, coffee, and raw food) of 64.9% pregnant women is for the "baby's health."

Hobbies

  • Indulging and enjoying a woman's hobby during pregnancy is the right time to do so since when the baby arrives, it might absorb every moment of the mother's time.
  • Scrapbooking is one hobby, which records their pregnancy journey along with photos and timelines. It makes the mother feel calm and grounded while saving precious moments in an intimate way.
  • Reading is another hobby that is usually enjoyed during pregnancy. Additionally, reading aloud can also be helpful so the baby can also listen.

Values

  • Healthy behaviors about their "health" is also one of the important personal values considered by this group, which in turn would indicate a reduction of adverse pregnancy outcomes due to having positive changes in their health attitudes.
  • The consideration prevents antenatal anxiety, which is experienced by 10% of women during their pregnancy (and 5% of their partners). This is done by seeking help from their partner, anyone they trust, health professionals, and support services.

Spending Patterns

  • The time during pregnancy is when pregnant consumers decide on how to handle baby-related expenses and the time of figuring out where to make cuts.
  • During this time, some changes on household expenses are checked, spending only on those that need to be prioritized. This is because there are a lot of considerations when it comes to spendings, such as doctor's visits, prenatal consultations, tests, medications, delivery expenses, and the baby's soon-to-be daily necessities, and changing needs.
  • For advertisers in the US, if marketing spends for an average person would be worth $0.10, that for a pregnant woman would be $1.50.
  • These statistics mean that marketing to expectant mothers is very important because their purchasing habits, when done during pregnancy, are very crucial and dealt which much importance and consideration.

Sources
Sources

From Part 02
Quotes
  • "more than three quarters (77%) say a “doctor recommended” seal is important when purchasing OTCs, according to a new four-part survey titled, “Mom-Shop Report, A National Survey of New Moms’ Shopping Behavior,” conducted by RLA Collective, Persuadable Research and Mommy MD Guides®. "
  • "Facebook is key to this group: Nearly 7 in 10 women across all life stages have “liked” a brand’s Facebook page in the last 6 months and the number of brand pages liked or followed is very high: 29% of the moms say they liked 21 or more Facebook brand pages."
Quotes
  • "Over-the-counter (OTC) medicines are medicines you can buy without a prescription from your doctor. Medicines for nausea are called antiemetics. They can help relieve nausea and vomiting. Several OTC medicines are used as antiemetics. "
Quotes
  • "They’re less price sensitive: New parents are highly price insensitive; they’re less likely to cringe at high prices. "
From Part 03
From Part 04
From Part 07