At-Home Test Consumers

Part
01
of three
Part
01

At-Home Test Consumers: Demographics

Over the past two years, companies offering at-home health testing, also known as direct to client lab tests (DTC), have grown substantially, securing contracts with large retailers such as Target, CVS, Wellgreens, and Walmart. They have also been drawing competition from diagnostic lab giants Quest and Labcorp. The tests offered by these companies cater to medical conditions of all genders and age groups. Therefore, there appears to be no one set of demographics for these products.

Race

Gender

  • Companies divide at-home testing products into categories such as: Women's health-specific products for fertility, menopause, and STDs and HPV, as well as men's health-specific products for hormonal imbalance. There are also general sexuality tests, mainly for STDs, and general well-being tests for vitamins and cholesterol and blood work.
  • Advertising media of EverlyWell showed mainly females using the product. LetsGetChecked and QuestDirect advertising media displays males and females in equal numbers.

Age

Education

  • Research on at-home genetic market testing shows 94% of users have a college education.

Income level

Research Strategy

We consulted the example companies' and competitors' websites to develop a good understanding of the products that make up the at-home tests market. We used these products to make assumptions about the audience's gender and age. We triangulated these assumptions with the social media accounts of the companies in the review and triangulated the findings with information about their marketing strategy. Then, we sourced websites of advertising firms and reports about events created by the companies to come up with age, gender, and race information. Next, we used Google Scholar to scour for academic articles about consumers' use of similar products, as a proxy for the education level of the audience in this report.

We triangulated the age and education data we found with the database of the Census Bureau to arrive at the users' income level. According to the Census Bureau, the mean income for people (male and female) aged 25-65 goes as follows:

Some college, no degree = $43,528
Associate Degree = $48,190
Bachelor's Degree = $71,909
More than one Bachelor's Degree = $82,260
Master's Degree = $88,482
Professional Degree = $140,292
Doctorate Degree = $120,921

Therefore, the average annual income for customers is: (43,528+48,190+71,909+82,260+88,482+140,292+120,921)/7 = $85,083

Part
02
of three
Part
02

At-Home Test Consumers: Psychographics

Some values of At-Home Test Consumers include privacy and confidentiality. The purchase motivations for the consumers is having control over their healthcare and applying less invasive approaches. About a third of consumers of At-Home Tests are interested in using them for identifying symptoms and for health coaching.

Values

Attitudes

  • Customers want to be more in charge of their healthcare.
  • The consumers are against restrictions. They are free and seek to have as many tests as possible with no restrictions.
  • They have positive attitudes towards engaging in healthy behaviors.
  • Consumers of At-Home Tests are open to new channels of care, particularly At-Home diagnostic testing.
  • About half of the respondents said they are comfortable using an At-Home Test to diagnose infections (e.g., strep throat and urinary tract infections) before going to the doctor for treatment.
  • They have a positive attitude towards patients’ responsibility for their health care.

Interests

Media Usage

Purchase Motivations

  • One of the purchase motivations is seeking control over their healthcare.
  • Patients are also motivated by convenience and privacy offered by the At-Home Test companies.
  • The consumers are motivated to go for less-invasive approaches. For instance, some At-Home Test consumers, such as those testing for a colonoscopy, seek less-invasive approaches to tests such as colonoscopies.
  • Another motivation is the capability of At-Home Test companies such as LetsGetChecked offering a variety of certified tests combined with very affordable pricing offered.

Part
03
of three
Part
03

At-Home Test Consumers: Trends

Two trends in the at-home testing market related to consumer behavior are consumers finding it easy to use at-home testing due to a growing awareness on early detection and prevention, and consumers in good health were more likely to use at-home testing, than those who view themselves as less-healthy, as people get more comfortable sharing their data that is collected by at-home testing devices. Detailed information is in the next section.

CONSUMERS ARE FINDING IT EASY TO USE AT-HOME TESTING

HOW IT IS IMPACTING THE MARKET
  • The fact that consumers are finding it easy to carry out at-home testing has led to the growth of the market and an expected increase in the development of at-home tests for many more diseases.
  • According to a survey by The Wall Street Journal, around half of the respondents admitted to finding it easy to carry out at-home testing before visiting a doctor for treatment.
  • Also, 45% are willing to try an at-home genetic test to find out if they have any existing or future health risks. Around 44% of respondents are also fine to use an at-home blood test that is connected to an app to follow overall health trends, such as cholesterol, blood glucose, inflammation, and triglycerides.
  • The trend has led to companies such as 23andMe and Ancestry of Lehi owning a big percentage of "the world’s largest collections of human DNA," as more than 26 million people had taken an at-home ancestry test by the start of 2019.
FACTORS DRIVING THE TREND

CONSUMERS IN GOOD HEALTH ARE MORE LIKELY TO USE AT-HOME TESTING

HOW IT IS IMPACTING THE MARKET
  • This trend has led to the development of new prevention and wellness related tests, tools, and apps by many device manufacturers. This is because 43% of consumers consider themselves in good health and this has led to companies targeting them with tools to help in the prediction and the prevention of potential health issues such as genomic profiling.
  • For example, AliveCor has developed a device that is used to remotely monitor arrhythmia. The device is plugged into a smartphone and used to perform an electrocardiogram, a test that measures the electrical activity of the heartbeat, in 30 seconds.
  • KardiaMobile is used to measure how healthy a person’s heart is, using a blood sample and a connected app. The blood is tested for levels of fasting blood glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides, and inflammation. The app is then used to provide insights related to the indicators and recommendations on exercise, diet, supplements, and relaxation.
FACTORS DRIVING THE TREND
  • One factor driving the trend is that consumers are now more comfortable to share their data that is collected by at-home testing devices. According to a survey by The Wall Street Journal, 40% of consumers looking for healthcare services are fine sharing their health data with manufacturers of a device if their data helped improve the device.
  • A second factor driving the trend is the reduction in health care costs when consumers use at-home testing devices as compared to visiting a doctor. Cor, for example, produces raw data similar to that produced by expensive annual blood tests done by doctors, with a similar level of accuracy, at $99.

RESEARCH STRATEGY

To find trends in the at-home testing market related to consumer behavior, our first research strategy was to search for relevant information in reputable reports, news sites, and industry databases. This strategy led us to sources such as Deloitte, Technology Review, and The Wall Street Journal, which provided some trends. Then, we selected those trends that were repeated at least twice in these sources. This strategy provided two trends that were included in our findings.
Sources
Sources

From Part 01
Quotes
  • "popular items are the food sensitivity test, the testosterone level test, fertility tests for women, sexually transmitted disease (STD) tests, and the Lyme Disease test "
Quotes
  • "The tests evaluate sexual health and wellness, covering illnesses such as herpes, hepatitis B and C, chlamydia, gonorrhea, syphilis, HIV, celiac, Lyme, diabetes, and colon cancer, in addition to disorders involving the thyroid, liver, folate, ovarian reserve, cholesterol, and omega 3 levels. "
Quotes
  • "Major players from large commercial retailers to diagnostic companies are jumping on the direct-to-consumer (DTC) bandwagon, entering into partnerships to offer consumers at-home tests or in some instances open up testing centers at retail sites."
From Part 03
Quotes
  • "Fifty-one percent are comfortable using an at-home test to diagnose infections (such as strep throat and urinary tract infection) before going to the doctor for treatment."
Quotes
  • " Home tests can be cost-effective, quick, and confidential."
  • "A growing awareness about the health benefits of preventive care and early diagnosis is helping fuel demand for at-home diagnostic tools that can detect an array of illnesses and conditions."
Quotes
  • "Consumers are increasingly open to new channels of care — particularly at-home diagnostic testing. About half of this year’s survey respondents said they are comfortable using an at-home test to diagnose infections (e.g., strep throat and urinary tract infections) before going to the doctor for treatment."
Quotes
  • "The testing frenzy is creating two superpowers—Ancestry of Lehi, Utah, and 23andMe of Mountain View, California. These privately held companies now have some of the world’s largest collections of human DNA."
  • "For consumers, the tests—which cost as little as $59—offer entertainment, clues to ancestry, and a chance of discovering family secrets, such as siblings you didn’t know about."
Quotes
  • "Our remarkable technology and algorithms produce raw data that is very similar to the blood test data that your doctor orders once a year, with a similar level of accuracy. We call these data our “indicators.” We make it easy for you to track these indicators on a weekly basis to see trends and improvements, but we even go a step further."