Cooler consumption in Southern Florida- Target Market

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Cooler Consumption Demographic Profile

While there is no information available on the demographics and psychographics of south Florida wine cooler consumers, and limited information on wine cooler consumers in the U.S. overall, I was able to find some relevant information on this topic: there are 7.8 million consumers in the U.S. for whom wine coolers are the beverage of choice, and an estimated 144,000 of them live in south Florida. These drinks are popular among high-frequency wine drinkers, who are primarily white, middle-to-upper middle class, and ranging in age from millennial to Baby Boomer. These drinkers generally consume their wine at home, are urban educated professionals, value organic and sustainable production methods, and choose wine coolers because they are convenient. Moreover, the "beerification" of the wine industry is creating a new market for wine coolers and similar beverages to attract consumers that would typically choose beer.

Below you'll find an outline of our research methodology to better understand why information you've requested is publicly unavailable, as well as a deep dive into our findings.

methodology

Despite extensive searching, I was unable to find anything specific to the demographics or psychographics of south Florida wine cooler consumers; this is simply too specific of a market on which to find data. From there, I expanded my search to look for a profile of wine cooler consumers on the national level. What I uncovered, however, is that there is very little existing, publicly available research on this topic. I looked at industry reports and market research, consumer reports from trusted sites such as Nielsen and Mintel, trusted media sites, blogs and articles from industry experts, and a number of other sources. Despite this digging, I couldn't find any relevant and recent sources to provide a direct answer to your query.

From there, I tried looking for a way to triangulate the information, or a way to come up with an independent analysis. Unfortunately, there was not enough available and relevant data for either of these approaches. You may be able to find psychographics of wine consumers or of alcohol consumers in general, and perhaps within the age and gender group you specified, but given the small size of the wine cooler market compared to the overall wine market, this data would be far too generalized to be relevant. To address this problem, at least in part, I looked for research on the ready-to-drink alcoholic beverage category, which includes wine coolers as well as alcopop, pre-mixed cocktails, hard lemonade, and similar beverages. However, research on this category was very limited, as well. Next, I tried an approach where I looked at popular brands of wine coolers to assess their target market and see if I could glean any insights from that, or see any overarching trends. While I was able to learn some about the target markets of these companies, which I'll discuss more in the next section, it wasn't specific enough to really answer your question in terms of behavior or psychographics.

helpful findings

Despite the lack of publicly available data to directly answer your question, I was able to find some sources that provide insights relevant to this topic.

According to Statista, there were 21.38 million consumers of wine coolers in the U.S. in 2016. Of those, 7.8 million Americans reported that wine coolers were their beverage of choice, which they drink more often than all other beverages. That represents roughly 2% of the total U.S. population of 327 million. If we assume that same percentage of wine cooler consumers holds true for south Florida, we can estimate that there are roughly 144,000 consumers in the region for whom wine coolers are the beverage of choice (that's 2% of south Florida's population of approximately 6 million).

In terms of the demographics of these consumers, I was able to find a few sources that provide insights. This article reports that 24% of high-frequency wine drinkers surveyed also drink wine coolers. The demographics of this group are: 80% Caucasian, 8% African-American, 6% Asian-American, and 5% Hispanic. They are split evenly by sex, although women account for 57% of wine consumption in the U.S. in terms of volume, and 45% of high-frequency wine drinkers make between $50,000 and $100,000 per year. Millennials account for 30% of this group, and Baby Boomers account for 38%. This demographic consumes 68% of its wine at home, 15% at a restaurant or bar, 13% at someone else's home, and 4% at other venues.

Moreover, 38% of women and 32% of men say that organic and sustainable production is important to them when choosing wines to purchase. In addition, "Highly involved female wine drinkers are mostly Millennials (and skew toward older Millennial), are more often urban educated professionals, and more ethnically diverse than the typical female wine drinker."

Ready-to-drink (RTD) alcoholic beverages perform well with women overall. While only 30% of Bud Light drinkers are women, the brand's RTD line, Light-A-Rita, attracts 65% women. These drinks are also popular among youth, and the majority of drinkers choose these beverages because they are convenient.

Finally, a key trend in the wine cooler segment in recent years is the "beerification" of the wine market. There is an effort in the industry to create and market wine products to be a replacement for beer and to be consumed in scenarios in which beer would be the beverage of choice. This trend showed up in my analysis of the marketing and branding efforts of popular wine cooler brands. Mighty Swell, for example, describes itself as a "fun, young, healthy and active" brand, and says that their wine coolers are meant to be consumed outside. The company's marketing reinforces this: the brand name itself, and tagline "Ride the Wave", implies surfing, and the company's Instagram is full of images that invoke outdoor adventures such as camping, hiking, and the beach. This type of fun, adventurous, lifestyle messaging would typically be associated with beer, but is being used to promote wine coolers, in this case. This use of messaging is echoed by another up-and-coming wine cooler brand, Ramona, which markets itself as a go-to drink for lifestyle events such as music festivals, parties, and even in clubs, where it's been seen being consumed by hip-hop artists Kanye West and Rihanna.

In this article from Forbes, an industry expert discusses this trend, explaining that the wine cooler is making a comeback. To jump on this industry trend of the "beerification" of wine, his company already markets wine in a can, and is developing wine coolers and wine cocktails. The article reports that canned wine sales grew 125% in one year's time, and are worth $16.4 million.

conclusion

To wrap up, despite the lack of relevant and publicly available data on this topic, I was able to learn that there are 7.8 million consumers in the U.S. for whom wine coolers are the beverage of choice. These drinks are popular among high-frequency wine drinkers, who are primarily white, middle-to-upper middle class, and ranging in age from millennial to Baby Boomer. These drinkers generally consume their wine at home, are urban educated professionals, value organic and sustainable production methods, and choose wine coolers because they are convenient. Moreover, the "beerification" of the wine industry is creating a new market for wine coolers and similar beverages to attract consumers that would typically choose beer.

Sources
Sources