Companies and Student Leadership Development

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Companies and Student Leadership Development, P1

Several nonprofit student leadership programs are linked with for-profit organizations to benefit the program's development. This appears to be a pattern among business-oriented student development programs. For-profit entities may benefit by improving their public image through corporate responsibility initiatives and can also gain a network of future employees through program participation. Below are three partnerships and are included in the attached spreadsheet: Emory University's Goizueta Business School and Delta Airlines, Indiana University's Kelley School of Business and Deloitte Consulting LLP, and the Forté Foundation with 47 corporations.

WHY TEAM UP?

It makes sense for nonprofit organizations to partner with for-profit organizations and vice-versa. Generally speaking, partnerships improve cost savings for both organizations by sharing responsibilities, enhancing program offerings, and improving outreach efficiency. Student leadership programs provide an avenue for for-profit organizations to show they are giving back to the community and to help train future employees.

EXAMPLE PROGRAMS

Emory University's Goizueta Business School partners with Delta Airlines in offering a student leadership program named the Delta Leadership Coaching Fellows Program. The Coaching Fellows Program allows students to complete workshops beyond the MBA curriculum, gain real-world experience through practicum experiences, and have one-on-one sessions with executive coaches. The partnership allows Delta to provide support for their "hometown" of Atlanta, Georgia.

The Kelley School of Business at Indiana University partners with Deloitte in the Digital Intelligence Initiative, a program designed to help faculty better prepare students for careers in emerging technological innovations.

The Forté Foundation works to launch businesswomen into successful careers by giving women access to exclusive job openings, workshops and networking events. It partners with 47 companies to achieve its goals. These companies gain access to a pipeline of businesswomen through participation.

CONCLUSION

Partnership with a nonprofit student leadership program can provide a resource for for-profit companies to gain future employees and can serve as a way for these organizations to give back to the communities they serve. Business development leadership programs are linked to for-profit companies, either through specific sponsorship requests, or, in the case of university programs, through major gifts from for-profit companies.
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Companies and Student Leadership Development, P2

In the attached spreadsheet we profiled 3 nonprofit organizations that help major corporations by serving as third party for student leadership initiatives.

Companies get tremendous advantages by partnering with third parties to impact students. Genesys Works, LEAD, and Year Up are three examples of such organizations. Each of the nonprofits offers unique benefits to partner companies and operates with a distinct funding model. The following is a summary that discusses what companies each of these organizations has partnered with, the benefit for each party, and the non-profit's charging structure for their student leadership program.

GENESYS WORKS

Genesys Works uniquely provides training for high school students from low-income backgrounds in leadership, professional and technical skills for 8-weeks. Following their leadership training, the program sets students up with 12-month paid internships with corporate partners.

Example Partner Companies
Genesys Works partners with a list of over 100 companies that include AT&T, GE, Target, Google, Accenture, Sales, TransUnion, 3M, Wells Fargo, and JP Morgan Chase.

How Each Party Benefits Genesys Works serves as a “talent contractor” while providing transformational leadership development opportunities for students. Corporate partners get the following benefits:
1) Inexpensive, effective, and diverse workplace recruitment pipeline filled with local talent 2) Immediate team value 3) Productivity increases due to the chance to unload mundane tasks from their most valuable employees
4) Increased workplace morale
5) Mentoring and leadership development opportunities for current staff.

Fee Structure
The nonprofit manages recruitment of students, initial screening, leadership and skills training, hiring, wages and taxes, then invoices its partner companies for the services provided once a student is placed. Client companies are charged for the work performed at invoice rates of approximately $20-$23 per hour. Charge rates differ based on location and work roles. Student participants are usually paid $10-$13 per hour. The spread between the billing rate covers nonprofit direct expenses such as payroll taxes, unemployment, program costs connected to training of interns, transportation, college prep, student rewards and recognition, and more.

LEAD

LEAD's mission is to make a way for the nations highest achieving diverse students to develop into high-achieving, and responsible leaders in business.

Example Partner Companies
LEAD currently has 13 program partners including ExxonMobil, Coca-Cola, PwC, Delta Airlines, Dow, Goldman Sachs, Google, McNeil, Nestle, and Dupont USA.

How Each Party Benefits
By working with university and corporate partners, the organization has served over 10,000 through its LEAD Summer Institutes.
Corporate sponsors get the following benefits:
1) Marketing/Branding— as LEAD is a global organization that is highly visible to media, top universities, and other corporations
2) Recruitment — LEAD promotes early relationship and talent pipeline development. Companies that donate get access to the LEAD database for personal recruiting introductions
3) Access to “compelling statistics” on Alumni and their career choices
4) Networking opportunities with premier university college administrators, career development professionals, and other industry leaders

Fee Structure
LEAD does not charge for services. It is a registered 501(c)3 charitable organization, and relies solely on support through gifts and grants.

YEAR UP

Year Up is a 12 month in-depth training program that provides young adults with course work that is eligible for college credit, plus real-world leadership skills development, corporate internship opportunities, and success support.

Example Partner Companies
Year Up partners with 250+ leading U.S. employers including Accenture, ACE Hardware, Airbnb, Allstate, American Express, Chevron, DocuSign, Ernst & Young LLP, Facebook, Hilton Worldwide, Linked In, and Viacom.

How Each Party Benefits
By partnering with leading companies, Year Up is able to place its students in high quality positions that help them apply the technical and professional skills they learn in the first six months of the program.

Year Up corporate partners cite benefits of heightened workplace diversity, lowered hiring costs, improved employee retention and loyalty, and minimized risk in hiring as main program benefits. Statistically, Year Up works 6x better as a talent pipeline when compared to traditional recruitment according to Year Up studies.

Fee Structure
Year Up does not charge corporate sponsors directly for its services. The organization is a Federal Partner with a GSA government contract which gives them $22,692-$23,211 per student (depending on location).

CONCLUSION

In sum, the attached spreadsheet outlines the program benefits, corporate partners, and fee structure of three large student leadership organizations. Each of the nonprofits offers unique benefits to partner companies and operates with a distinct funding model.
Sources
Sources