Coffee Culture - Various Global Markets

Part
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Part
01

Coffee Culture - Brazil

Coffee is enjoyed regularly in Brazil because it is cheap. The majority of individuals drink coffee for personal pleasure. Senior Brazilians consume more coffee than their younger counterparts.

MOTIVATIONS AND ATTITUDES OF CONSUMERS IN BRAZIL

  • Brazilians reserve coffee that is not good enough to be exported for local consumption (but still quite high quality), exporting only the best the country has to offer. For this reason, coffee is enjoyed regularly and cheaply in Brazilian culture.
  • A majority of the individuals in Brazil (81%) drink coffee for personal pleasure, 48% say it is a habit and a tradition since childhood as a part of their breakfast. Others consume coffee as a stimulant, relaxer and to counter headaches.

DIFFERENCE IN CONSUMPTION BASED ON GENDER

  • According to a National Dietary Survey, males consume more coffee than females. They have a 12% greater coffee intake than females.
  • The highest intake of coffee was recorded among older males.

DIFFERENCE IN CONSUMPTION BASED ON AGE

  •  Millennials between the ages of 18 and 24 consume a lot of coffee in Brazil and other countries.
  • Among persons aged 16 – 20 years old, 49% have 3.7 cups of coffee daily.
  • 89% of senior Brazilians have coffee daily.

DIFFERENCE IN CONSUMPTION BASED ON RACE

  • Brazilian whites (58.9%) consume more coffee than other races (41.1%).

RESEARCH STRATEGY

We started the research by looking for data on coffee culture in Brazil. We looked for surveys and articles based on coffee consumption in Brazil. This proved successful as it yielded results in terms of consumer motivations and attitudes. However, the data we found was limited as part of the age group and race was not covered.

We then conducted a search on surveys done by market leaders in the coffee sector in Brazil to identify any psychographic and demographic details of the consumers. We referred to press releases, publications, and company blogs of leading coffee brands in Brazil. The company resources only focused on their offerings, competitive advantage, and financials. We also examined their marketing strategy as their target audience could be identified. However, the publicly accessible resources discovered no data that could be helpful in defining or deriving coffee consumption based on sex, age, and ethnicity.
Our final approach was to try to expand the study and search for studies in Brazil on consumer behavior and lifestyles. In this research, we intended to discover anything relevant to coffee consumption to know the gender, age, and race-based differences in coffee consumption. We explored sources such as International Communicaffe and National Coffee Association Blog among others. These sources did not provide any additional information other than what we already had.
Part
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Part
02

Coffee Culture - Russia

Until 20 years ago, Russia was frequently associated with its tea-drinking culture that has roots going back to hundreds of years. While the tea-drinking market dominates the hot drink segment, the country's coffee consumption is steadily rising. The coffee sector in the country is driven to new heights by the shifting habits and tastes of Russia. It was also revealed that Russians are more likely to add milk, cream, spices, chocolate, berries, lemon, and liqueur to their coffee drink.

MOTIVATION

  • According to an article published by Kremlintour, Russians tend to visit coffee shops for reasons that are quite different from the West. While Western countries most often take coffee-to-go, Russians prefer to spend time with friends over coffee or share a meal with the caffeine drink.
  • The coffee sector in Russia is being propelled forward primarily due to their shifting tastes and habits. The culture of coffee consumption has increased over the past few years with coffee sales amounting to over 52.9% of the country's entire sale of hot drinks, in 2017.
  • Compared with the tea segment in Russia, the preference of coffee has risen to surpass their consumption of tea, which was once the country's favorite hot drink. It was found that Russians consume 1.7kg per capita of coffee per year while tea consumption amounts to 1.3kg per capita.
  • The increased consumption of coffee in the country is driven by the expansion of coffee chains and coffee houses throughout Russia. According to Comunicaffe, during the period 2011-2016, over 1,000 coffee shops were launched. According to a study, coffee consumption in Russia will continue to increase at a CAGR of 2% for the forecast period 2016-2021.
  • It was found that Russians do not prefer strong coffee for its bitterness.
  • According to the former general manager of Nabisco, Tchibo, and Tata, Daniel Brooks, one of the main reasons why Russians prefer drinking coffee with milk and sugar is because the two ingredients are used in their tea-drinking tradition. Since they add both sugar and milk in tea, they tend to use the same for their coffee drinks. This is also the reason why Cappuccino is popular in the country.
  • Daniel Brooks revealed that over 85% of the coffee consumed in Russia is taken with milk, while 75% is taken sugar. He also points out that the "Russians are gradually moving towards drinking coffee in the way that the rest of the world drinks it."

ATTITUDES

  • According to coffee statistics in Russia, around 85% of them prefer to drink instant coffee than coffee beans. However, it has been noticed that with every passing year, the number of instant coffee drinkers is reducing while the preference for fresh coffee is rising.
  • Russians practice brewing their coffee at home in Turkish brewing pots and Moka pots. They prefer to take their coffee with additives such as liqueur, lemon, berries, chocolate, spices, cream, and milk.
  • In terms of global consumption, Russia's coffee intake is much lower than several European countries.
  • The growing coffee culture is also attributed to the "activities of many local independent specialty coffee stores". Although the preference for instant coffee currently dominates the Russian consumers' coffee consumption habits, there is a significant growth in the demand for fresh ground coffee. The shift in tastes is also due to the country's current economic advantage, thus, enabling Russians to spend more on specialty coffee.
  • According to Daniel Brooks, "All along, Russian consumers continued to believe firmly that roast and ground coffee is inherently superior while purchasing soluble because of convenience."
  • Russians' attitude toward drinking coffee includes spending long hours at coffee houses chatting and spending time with friends and family. It is expected that 9 out of 10 times, the time spent by Russians on a coffee date can go up to four hours, just with a cup of coffee.

OTHER HELPFUL INFORMATION ABOUT THE COFFEE CULTURE IN RUSSIA

  • Originally, Russians were tea drinkers but coffee has gained its popularity over the past two decades and has become a popular consumer's choice as well.
  • It was found that 100% of coffee products in Russia are imported from Vietnam, Brazil, and Indonesia.
  • The imports of coffee products to Russia increased by 7.4% in 2016.
  • The retail sales of coffee products in 2016 was reported to be $2.5 million with a rise in sales by 1.2%.


RESEARCH STRATEGY

While we found no information on the differences based on gender, age, and race of the coffee consumption culture in Russia, we were able to gather and provide data on the consumer motivations and attitudes in Russia.

To begin, we searched for direct information on the coffee consumer demographics, statistics, motivations, and attitudes in Russia by looking into reports from industry-specific websites such as Euromonitor, media websites such as Forbes and The Moscow Times, and market-specific websites such as Cafespaces. After an extensive search through these channels, we found numerous reports on global coffee consumption with limited information on coffee consumption in Russia with no data on its demographics. While we found general consumer demographic information of Russia, there was no available information specific to coffee consumption demographics.

We then tried looking for any media statements from coffee industry experts in Russia. The idea was to locate any expression of views/facts about coffee drinkers in the country and through that build an analysis of Russia's coffee consumption culture. We searched for coffee industry experts in Russia such as manufacturers, brands, and distributors. The sources found provided different coffee companies and cafes talking about how many coffee drinks are being consumed by Russian consumers every day along with other related insights. However, we found no media statements from coffee industry experts that pertained to coffee statistics in terms of gender, age and race in Russia.

Lastly, we tried to triangulate the requested information by focusing on the coffee chains and coffee shops in Russia. Generally, some coffee shops conduct surveys for business improvement and we expected to find some published survey analysis on their websites. We began our search by looking for the top coffee shops in Russia. After a thorough search, we found surveys and reports on company-specific consumption in terms of the number of coffee drinks sold rather than data/statistics on demographic consumption.

The lack of demographic information on coffee consumption for Russia is more likely because Russia has recently adopted the practice of drinking coffee. History shows that Russia was originally a tea-drinking country and coffee was introduced only 20 years ago. The evolution of coffee drinks are just starting in the country and it is observed that studies, reports, and analysis on demographics have not been conducted yet by the Russian coffee market.

Part
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Part
03

Coffee Culture - Mexico

Detailed research could not uncover sufficient information regarding coffee consumption culture of customers in Mexico regarding their motivations, attitudes, and differences in coffee consumption based on gender, age, and race. Below are the helpful findings we were able to retrieve and research strategies utilized.


HELPFUL FINDINGS

  • A report revealed that the market of coffee in Mexico consists of fresh roasted and ground coffee, instant coffee, RTD coffee, and coffee pods.
  • A survey on coffee consumption habits in Mexico revealed that 55 percent of the respondents drink coffee daily.
  • According to Euromonitor International, between 75% and 100% of the Mexico population are "avid coffee drinkers."
  • A shred of supporting evidence from the International Coffee Council on Mexico revealed that coffee consumption rate was significantly higher in men (51%) than in women (33%).
  • The market surveys by Euromonitor on consumption behavior of coffee in 15 countries (including Mexico) revealed that 55.6% of young people between 16 and 25 years old selected coffee as their favorite drink.
  • A report revealed that the percentage of millennials that prefer taking coffee in Mexico is high.
  • A report by Report Buyer that was published by PRNewswire revealed that there is an increase in the demand for coffee in Mexico from the millennial population.
  • The increase in the demand for coffee from the millennial population has led to an increase in coffee shops, which has further strengthened Mexico's coffee market.
  • In Mexico, consumption of coffee is not considered as the regular morning routine, but an important part of relaxation during lunch or dinner time.
  • Also, several coffee shops in Mexico usually open late morning.
  • The most common thread in Mexico regarding coffee is that coffee consumption is a "social activity."
  • A report revealed that the average annual consumption of coffee in Mexico is between 1.3 kg/per capita to 1.5 kg/per capita.
  • In Mexico, "ground coffee" consumption has increased significantly and is the second-largest share of domestic use.
  • In Mexico, "soluble coffee" has about 60 to 65 percent share of coffee consumption.
  • Also, the consumption of "roasted coffee" is increasing as consumers now have more options for freshly made coffee through the increasing number of specialty coffee shops in the country.

RESEARCH STRATEGY

To address the research request, our initial approach was to search through government databases such as USDA Foreign Agricultural Service to identify the coffee consumption culture of customers in Mexico regarding their motivations, attitudes, and differences in coffee consumption based on gender, age, and race. Here, the information we were able to identify was generally about various types of coffee that customers' consume in Mexico, coffee production, trade, policy, and stocks in Mexico. We could not retrieve direct information regarding consumer motivations, attitudes, and differences in the consumption of coffee in Mexico based on gender, age, and race using this strategy.

Next, we searched through press releases, news outlets, and market reports such as PRNewswire, Newswire, MarketWatch, MarketsandMarkets, among others to identify the coffee consumption culture of customers in Mexico regarding their motivations, attitudes, and differences in coffee consumption based on gender, age, and race. Here, we were able to identify the age group of consumers with the highest demand for coffee in Mexico. Again, we could not retrieve direct information regarding consumer motivations, attitudes, and differences in the consumption of coffee in Mexico based on gender and race using this strategy. Also, we could not retrieve sufficient information surrounding the age group with the highest demand for coffee in Mexico.

Next, we searched through various scientific research databases, educational research databases, and statistics databases such as Euromonitor, ResearchGate, Academia, Statista, among others to identify the coffee consumption culture of customers in Mexico regarding their motivations, attitudes, and differences in coffee consumption based on gender, age, and race. Here, we were able to identify the general consumption of coffee in Mexico, the consumption differences among genders, and the age group with the highest demand for coffee in Mexico. This strategy could not uncover sufficient information regarding the coffee consumption culture of customers in Mexico regarding their motivations, attitudes, and differences in coffee consumption based on gender, age, and race.

Furthermore, we expanded the scope of our search to identify reports published beyond the last two years to uncover relevant information regarding the coffee consumption culture of customers in Mexico regarding their motivations, attitudes, and differences in consumption based on gender, age, and race. Here, we were able to identify additional information and statistics regarding the millennial demand for coffee in Mexico that corroborates other recent publications and the gender differences in coffee consumption.

Lack of retrieval of sufficient information regarding the coffee consumption culture of customers in Mexico regarding their motivations, attitudes, and differences in consumption based on gender, age, and the race could be as a result of lack of sufficient research on the subject or as a result of lack of publication of such information on public data.






Part
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Part
04

Coffee Culture - Germany

In Germany, 86% drink coffee on a daily basis, with an average per-day intake of 1.43 cups. While 60% of coffee consumers in Germany claim that they drink coffee as it makes them happy, 43% find it difficult getting through the day without coffee.

Motivations and Attitudes of Coffee Consumers in Germany

  • Around 86% of Germans drink coffee on a daily basis, with an average per-day intake of 1.43 cups.
  • In Germany, 60% of coffee drinkers say that they drink coffee as it makes them happy and 43% find it difficult getting through the day without coffee.
  •  Some 13% of Germans consider themselves coffee connoisseurs, with that percentage increasing to 23% of the people aged between 35 and 44 years.
  •  Around 74% of coffee drinkers in Germany consume the beverage before 9am, while "48% drink it between 9am and 1pm and 4% claim to enjoy the drink at 9pm or later."
  • Germany leads consumption of coffee in office with a value of 725 million euros (sell-in) and an average growth of 3% as of 2018. The high sale is mainly driven by coffee beans in “OCS table-top” machines which are generally used free of charge by the employees and are located at multiple places in an office to constitute refreshment points that are closer to the employees’ work stations.
  • In Germany, 63% of the volume of coffee consumed out of home is drunk in the office.
  • Among coffee consumers in Germany, 27% are interested in trying cold brew coffee which is generally sold in ready-to-drink (RTD) cans and bottles.
  • Germany is an advanced economy with a fairly affluent population with high buying prowess which drives around 50% of all German coffee drinkers to shell out extra money for the premium coffee experience.

Coffee Consumption based on Age

  • As of 2018, 85% of people in Germany over the age of 46 reported drinking coffee on a regular basis, compared to 77% of people aged between 36 years and 45 years and 42% of people aged between 18 and 35 years.
  • Forty-six percent of coffee consumers aged between 25 and 34 years are most interested in trying RTD cans and bottles.
  • While 29% of consumers aged between 16 and 24 claims that they do not consume coffee at all, nitro coffee attracts consumers who do drink coffee in this age group.

Research Strategy:

For this research, we were able to identify consumer motivations and attitudes in Germany, as well as the differences based on age. However, there is no information on the differences based on gender and race. In order to identify differences in consumption of coffee in Germany based on gender and race, we commenced our research with market reports on sources such as Statista, Mintel, MarketResearch, CBI Ministry of Foreign Affairs, National Coffee, and Euromonitor among others. The resources threw light on revenue of the coffee market, total consumption and bifurcation by types of coffee and differences in consumption by age; however, there was no bifurcation on the basis of gender or race. The report by Euromonitor consists of market and demand trends, which may include consumption patterns in Germany and bifurcation by gender or race but this report is locked behind a paywall.

Our second strategy was to refer to any surveys conducted by market leaders in the coffee sector in Germany to identify any psychographic and demographic details of the consumers. We referred to press releases, publications and company blogs of leading coffee brands in Germany such as Tchibo, Eduscho, Dallmayr, Niederegger, Jacobs, Kraft Heinz, Segafredo, Strauss Group, Caffè Nero, and Mondelez Deutschland. But the company resources only focused on their offerings, competitive advantage and financial reports. We also looked into their marketing strategy as that could identify their target audience; however, no information which could be useful in identifying or deriving the consumption of coffee based on gender and race was found in the publicly available resources.

Our third and final attempt was to broaden the search and look for studies conducted on consumer behavior and lifestyles in Germany and aimed to find anything pertinent to coffee consumption in those studies in order to understand differences in coffee consumption based on gender and race. We scoured through sources such as the Nuremberg Institute for Market Decisions, Santander Trade, and others. These sources only focused on demographics and consumption expenditure by product category in Germany, the information did not particularly focus on coffee as a product to understand or derive differences in consumption based on gender and race. In the absence of this information after using the above-mentioned strategies for finding the differences in coffee consumption by gender and race, we pulled together other useful findings with regard to consumer motivations and attitudes, as well as the differences in coffee consumption based on age as presented above.
Part
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Part
05

Coffee Culture - Canada

Consumer motivations, attitudes, and the differences based on gender, age, and race of the coffee consumption culture in Canada include the fact that men drink an average of three cups of coffee, while women drink almost two and a half cups. Research also found that younger coffee drinkers in Canada are more interested in newer types of coffee, compared with the older generation. On ethnicity, 56% of Caucasians consumed traditional coffee, while 8% consumed non-espresso coffee. In reference to where the coffee is prepared, in-home preparation was most popular among Caucasians as 82% favored this method, while 58% of East/Southeast Asians preferred out-of-home coffee. Detailed information is in the next section.

DIFFERENCES IN CONSUMPTION BASED ON GENDER

  • According to a coffee study in Canada, men drink an average of three cups of coffee, while women drink almost two and a half cups. Also, specialty coffees such as latte, cappuccino, macchiato, and espresso have become more popular in the country. This growth has been driven by female consumers who drink 65% of all hot specialty coffees served and 67% of all iced specialty coffees served.

DIFFERENCES IN CONSUMPTION BASED ON AGE

  • A survey that was taken in 2017 by the Coffee Association of Canada found that based on age, the percentage of Canadians aged between 18 to 79 who drank coffee that was espresso-based the day before the survey was 25% of those aged 18 to 24, 24% of those aged 25 to 34, 27% of those aged 35 to 49, 21% of those aged 50 to 64, and 18% of those aged 65 to 79.
  • Additionally, the percentage of Canadians aged between 18 to 79 who drank coffee that was non-espresso-based the day before the survey was 11% of those aged 18 to 24, 12% of those aged 25 to 34, 8% of those aged 35 to 49, 5% of those aged 50 to 64, and 4% of those aged 65 to 79.
  • A Mintel research found that younger coffee drinkers are more interested in newer types of coffee, compared with the older generation. Besides, young Canadians are introduced to coffee mostly through food-service, and drinkers lean towards the in-home consumption of coffee as they age. This trend requires a multi-channel strategy for sustained sales growth.

DIFFERENCES IN CONSUMPTION BASED ON RACE

  • According to a Statista survey on the number of 18 to 79-year-old Canadians who drank various types of coffee on one particular day in 2018, by ethnicity, 56% of Caucasians consumed traditional coffee, 8% consumed a non-espresso coffee, whilst 73% of those who consumed coffee in the survey, in general, were Caucasians.
  • The same survey found that 42% of East/Southeast Asians drank traditional coffee, 32% drank espresso-based coffee, and 11% drank non-espresso-based coffee. Also, 36% of South Asians consumed traditional coffee, 32% drank espresso-based coffee, and 10% drank non-espresso-based coffee. A link to the Statista source page copied and pasted in a Google Doc can be found here, in case the page has regional access restrictions.

CONSUMER MOTIVATIONS FOR COFFEE CONSUMPTION

  • One reason why Canadian millennials are motivated to consume coffee is to try out different flavors. This age group tends to drink different types of coffee which may change from time to time, including from morning to lunchtime, to supper time, and even from one day to the other.

RESEARCH STRATEGY

To provide an analysis of the coffee consumption culture in Canada in terms of consumer motivations, attitudes, and differences, based on gender, age, and race, our first strategy was to search for relevant information from pre-compiled sources in industry databases, publications, and reports. This strategy led us to sources such as Coffee Business Intelligence, Coffee Association of Canada, and Mintel, which provided information and statistics on consumer motivation, attitudes, and the differences based on gender, age, and race. This information was included in our findings.
Part
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Part
06

Coffee Culture - Australia

More than 27% of Australians indicated a daily necessity for coffee, and 88% stated they like it to some extent. Seventy-five percent of Australians enjoy at least one cup of coffee per day. Of that number, 28% have three or more cups per day.

COFFEE CULTURE — AUSTRALIA

  • Generally speaking, Australians consume coffee all day, every day. Usually, there is a strong demand for lattes, flat whites, and cappuccinos that peaks at 0900 hours local time.
  • The consumption of coffee is considered a social affair in Australia. And like many Western societies, coffee breaks are considered standard. Survey data from Nespresso and Galaxy Research indicate that 81% of Australians consider coffee breaks to be an excellent facilitator for communicating with colleagues.
  • The preceding decade has seen coffee consumption become a more adventurous, even luxurious, affair in Australia. With Australians increasingly attracted to higher quality coffee beans and international coffee styles.

CONSUMPTION DATA

  • According to survey data from McCrindle Research, 27% of Australians consume coffee daily. At least 88% of Australians like coffee to some extent, but these data vary by generation. Thirty-three percent of Australia’s younger generations (i.e., Generations X and Y) consume coffee daily compared to 45% of the Builders generation.
  • Eighty-four percent of McCrindle's respondents spend money on coffee in an average week. Australia ranked 42nd in the world for overall coffee consumption (3 kg/capita), and tourists have repeatedly recognized Melbourne as having the best coffee in the world.
  • Seventy-five percent of Australian respondents consume one cup of coffee per day. Of that number, 28% have three or more cups per day. However, respondents that indicated a preference for instant coffee were more likely to have three or more cups daily.
  • Along those lines, 39% of Australians prefer instant coffee, and another 39% prefer espresso. These data are also divided by generation, with 42% of the Builders preferring espresso coffee.
  • A significant majority (86%) of Australian coffee drinkers make their coffee at home. These data are also divided by generation. The younger generations are more likely (61% of Generation Z and 53% of Generation Y) to purchase coffee from cafés compared to Generation X (36%), Baby Boomers (33%), and Builders (26%).
  • While over 77% of espresso drinkers make their coffee at home on an average weekday, 60% of espresso drinkers are more likely to purchase their coffee from a cafe.
  • Square reports that lattes were a best-seller across Australia in 2018, but the total number of cups sold had decreased from 43% to 32% since 2016. State-by-state data indicated that 2017-2018 cappuccino sales were overtaking latte sales in New South Wales (NSW).
  • Meanwhile, year-on-year growth data indicated matcha-infused coffee sales increased by 80%, while 2018 chai sales were up 70% from October 2017.

RESEARCH STRATEGY

We began our investigation through the use of reports and data compiled by Australia's leading coffee outlets. While this avenue provided the vast majority of the data required, it did not provide information on coffee consumption by ethnicity and gender. We made a thorough investigation of all possible databases and industry sources looking for data organized by these variables. Our investigation yielded only consumption and trend data differentiated by age.
Part
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Part
07

Coffee Culture - UK

In the UK, the number of cups of coffee being taken by Whites is approximately 76 million, 6.46 million by Asians, 3.23 million by Blacks, 665,000 by the Chinese, 380,000 by Arabs, and 570,000 by others. Their motivations for consuming coffee include taste, to help them wake up in the morning, to maintain good health and a balanced diet, to relax, and to get a boost during the day. Below are the details of the research findings.

MOTIVATIONS

  • Taking 3-5 cups of coffee daily results in good health and a balanced diet.
  • 12% of the consumers of coffee take it to relax.
  • 19% of people in the UK need coffee to wake up in the morning.
  • 65% of people who take coffee say they prefer the taste of coffee to tea.
  • 39% of coffee consumers in the UK take coffee to boost them during the day.

ATTITUDES

  • 46% of consumers in the UK take coffee for pleasure.
  • 29% think that coffee making should be as effortless as possible.
  • 26% say that coffee is their drink of choice for quality moments.
  • 22% of consumers do not want to experiment on their coffee. They like to stick to their well-tried thing.
  • 21% want to try out a new coffee.
  • 12% like to try out new coffee trends.
  • 8% of consumers say that making coffee is an integral part of coffee pleasure.
  • 7% think that coffee as an addictive substance should be taken seriously.
  • 7% would like to drink less coffee.

DIFFERENCES

  • A male in the UK takes an average of 13 cups of coffee in a week, and a female coffee drinker takes 11 cups of coffee in a week.
  • People below the age of 20, take 0.5 cups a day. Millennials (2037) consume 1.3 cups of coffee, Gen X (38–52) take 2.1 cups of coffee a day, Baby Boomers (53–71) and those above 72 take 2.2 cups of coffee a day.
  • Millennials take more specialty coffee found in restaurants.

OTHER STATS

  • 77% of people in the UK buy instant coffee compared to 1% in Italy, and 7% in the USA.
  • There are 95 million cups of coffee taken in the UK daily.
  • Millennials account for 16% of coffee buyers.
  • The Whites have 80% of the whole population. The rest of the population is 6.8% Asian, 3.4% Black, 0.7% Chinese, 0.4% Arab, and 0.6% from other groups.

RESEARCH STRATEGY

The research team began by searching for information on coffee consumption for different races in the UK through sites such as Taylor & Francis, Statista, and British Coffee Association, where we found some information on caffeine intake, consumption of coffee in the UK by race, general statistics on coffee in the UK.

Since there were no compiled statistics on the consumption of coffee in the UK by race, we searched for data for triangulation through sites such as the Institute of Race Relations and Refinery 29. We found that the most recent census in the UK was in 2011. Based on the census figures, the population is 80% White, 6.8% Asian, 3.4% Black, 0.7% Chinese, 0.4% Arab, with 0.6% from other groups. We also found that the number of cups of coffee taken in a day is 95 million. Therefore, to calculate coffee consumption by race, we multiplied the total consumption in cups by the percentage of each race in the UK as follows:
Whites (80 * 95 million) /100 = 76 million cups
Asians (6.8 * 95 million) /100 = 6.46 million cups
Blacks (3.4 * 95 million) / 100 = 3.23 million cups
Chinese (0.7 * 95 million) /100 = 665,000 cups
Arabs (0.4 * 95 million) / 100 = 380,000 cups
other (0.6 * 95 million) /100 = 570,000 cups
Part
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Part
08

Coffee Culture - Spain

In 2017, the total amount of coffee consumed in Spain was 70.1 million kilograms.

Coffee Consumption in Spain

Consumer Motivations and Attitudes

  • Breakfast for locals in Spain consists of only coffee, rather than adding any food to the mix.
  • While milk coffee is preferred to wake up in the morning by the Spaniards, the stronger brew is consumed after lunch or in the afternoon.
  • The ritual and socializing that comes with coffee counts more for Spaniards than actually getting a caffeine fix as it is mostly consumed in bars and cafeterias, rather than at home.
  • At work, Spaniards often pop out for a coffee break with their colleagues and are more likely to meet friends outdoors for coffee, rather than inviting each other home.
  • Spain recorded the second-highest growth (+4.5%) due to the strong consumption of capsules in the office. Spain has about 2.7 million small and medium companies, and coffee consumption in the office is increasing sharply, where sales recorded a value of 380 million euros (sell-in) in 2018.
  • Coffee in Spain is usually brewed by the espresso way, where amount served is generally smaller and less watered down in comparison with northern European countries, but often packs a lot more punch.
  • Spanish coffee is unique in that most of it is torrefacto. This means that the coffee grain has 15% of sugar added to it before it is roasted, and this gives it a distinctively bitter and stronger taste. "The torrefacto tradition dates back to the Spanish Civil War as the cost-cutting practice meant the coffee beans were preserved for longer and increased the roast volume."

RESEARCH STRATEGY

After thorough research, we could not find publicly available information about differences based on gender, age, and race of the coffee consumption culture in Spain. To identify differences in the consumption of coffee in Spain based on gender, age, and race, we commenced my research with market reports on sources such as Statista, MarketResearch, among others. The resources threw light on revenue of the coffee market, total consumption, and bifurcation by types of coffee, but there was no bifurcation on the basis of gender, age, or race. The report by Euromonitor consists of market and demand trends, which may include consumption patterns in Spain and bifurcation by gender, age, or race. This report is locked behind a paywall.

Our next approach was to refer to any surveys conducted by market leaders in the coffee sector in Spain to identify any psychographic and demographic details of the consumers. We referred to press releases, publications, and company blogs of leading coffee brands in Spain such as Marcilla, Nespresso, and Nescafe. The company resources only focused on their offerings, competitive advantage, and financials. We also looked into their marketing strategy as that could identify their target audience. However, no information that could be useful in identifying or deriving the consumption of coffee based on gender, age, and race was found in the publicly available resources.

Our final strategy was to attempt to broaden the research and look for studies conducted on consumer behavior and lifestyles in Spain. We aimed to find anything pertinent to coffee consumption in those studies to understand the differences in coffee consumption based on gender, age, and race. We explored sources such as Santander Trade, Asendia, among others. These sources only focused on the demographics and consumption expenditure by product category in Spain. The information did not particularly focus on coffee as a product to understand or derive differences in consumption based on gender, age, and race. As per the research conducted, no studies or surveys have been conducted to identify the consumption patterns of coffee in Spain and their differences based on gender, age, and race.
Part
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Part
09

Coffee Culture - France

Eighty-eight percent of men and 79% of women in France consume coffee. French people are not very concerned about having "good coffee" as coffee shops mainly act as a social space, which plays a role in bringing people and cultures together. Below are more details about consumer motivations and attitudes of the coffee consumption in France as well as the demographic differences of the country's coffee drinkers based on gender, age, and race.

CONSUMER MOTIVATIONS AND ATTITUDES

  • Coffee is taken not so much for its quality but as a social facilitator in cafes providing a social space and for "shared moments." A French cafe is typically a communal space.
  • Cafes play a role in bringing people and cultures together and serve as intellectual and artistic melting pots.
  • Sixty-one percent of French people consume coffee for relaxation, while 59% for conviviality.
  • Coffee shops in Paris typically have longer opening hours, often staying open until 2 a.m., probably because they are viewed as an extension of an outdoor living room.
  • French people are not very much concerned about "good coffee." They drink their coffee as they would medicine. Artisan coffee is not a French thing.
  • Thanks to American and British expats, French coffee culture is changing, albeit slightly. Anglo-style coffee shops, which have pricier single-origin filter coffees, are cropping up; and they open for shorter hours than the typical French cafe. However, the French people still price their cafe culture, and Anglo-style coffee shops serving artisan coffee are only frequented by foreigners.
  • It is typical in France to order coffee after a meal. Note that coffee is not consumed with food unless it's breakfast, except for cafe gourmand, an espresso served with an array of mini desserts.
  • Coffee is typically taken while sitting down at home or in the bar of a coffee shop. Take-away coffee is not typically French.
  • Fifty-five percent of French people consume coffee in the morning, 33% at mid-day, and 47% in the afternoon.
  • Milk coffee is only taken during breakfast. Past breakfast, coffee is taken without milk.
  • Espresso is the drink of choice in France and can be taken at any time of the day.
  • One in two consumers is turning to ground coffee, especially those who are 65 years old and above, at 59%. However, although the coffee requirements of the French are increasing, a quarter of them still prefer soluble coffee, and 13% prefer coffee beans that they grind for consumption.
  • One in three consumers drink their coffee outside the home, 76% of those drink it at their workplace while 49% consume it in a cafe/bar/brewery/bar/restaurant.
  • In 2017, one in three adults had bought chilled coffee.

DEMOGRAPHIC DIFFERENCES: GENDER

DEMOGRAPHIC DIFFERENCES: AGE

  • In a study on conditions surrounding beverage consumption by the French, 45% of 20 to 34-year-olds and 42% of 35 to 54-year-olds associate coffee with work. On the other hand, 9% of 20 to 34-year-olds associate coffee with relaxation while it is 10% among 35 to 54-year-olds.
  • Fifteen percent of 20 to 34-year-olds prefer coffee when spending time with friends while it is 21% among 35 to 54-year-olds. On the other hand, 6% of 21 to 34-year-olds and 16% of 35 to 54-year-olds drink coffee to get a boost.
  • Coffee is more popular amongst those aged 50 years and above. Ninety-two percent of those in that age bracket consume coffee.
  • Sixty-five percent of French people prefer to consume coffee in pods. More so, more than two-thirds of 25 to 34-year-olds prefer pods because of their convenience.
  • Fifty-nine percent of people aged 65 years and above prefer ground coffee.
  • Coffee drinkers aged 16-24 are more likely to enjoy coffee with milk than those of older age groups. They also appreciate flavoring more, such as spicy or sweet, than their older counterparts.

DEMOGRAPHIC DIFFERENCES: RACE

  • There is no information available on demographic differences based on race in coffee consumption. Race does not seem to be an important differentiating factor in coffee consumption in France. However, Anglo-style cafes tend to have 70-80% foreigners/expats as customers. This is because expats prefer coffees that are more like the ones they are used to in their countries of origin.
  • Classic French cafes attract at least 50% French customers and some, like La Fontaine, boast of a 70% French clientele.

RESEARCH STRATEGY

We started the research by looking for data on coffee culture in France. This yielded results in terms of consumer motivations and attitudes. To get the demographic differences based on gender, age, and race of the coffee consumption in France, we had to look into sources written in French. This strategy proved successful as we were able to get statistics on age and gender. However, we were unable to find any data current or otherwise on race demographics of the coffee consumers in France. This is probably because race in itself is not a significant or consequential differentiator in coffee consumption in the country. Much so, marketing does not focus on race aspects. The focus is on "coffee culture" and the social benefits it brings. According to the data we found, only age is consequential in terms of marketing. Even though we were not able to find data on the race demographics of coffee drinkers in France, we did find some statistics on the patterns of coffee consumption by foreigners. This is in terms of outside influence by expats on the coffee culture in France.
Sources
Sources

From Part 05
Quotes
  • "A coffee study reported that among the number of cups consumed each day by coffee drinkers, men consume an average of 3 cups of coffee, while women drink just 2.4 cups."
Quotes
  • "This statistic displays the percentage of Canadians aged 18 to 79 who drank different types of coffee yesterday in 2018, by ethnicity. On a given day in 2018, 56 percent of Caucasians drank traditional coffee, whilst 8 percent of Caucasians drank a non-espresso-based beverage."
Quotes
  • "Among past-day coffee drinkers, Caucasians are most likely to use a drip coffee maker, while instant and RTD skew towards South Asians. "
Quotes
  • "Whether one is actively interested in exploring new innovations in the category is highly dependent on one’s age or generation. Younger consumers, for instance, prove to be more interested in newer types of coffee, while this passion for exploration softens with age. "
  • "Furthermore, foodservice is the means by which many young Canadians are introduced to coffee and, as such, these out-of-home brands prove to be particularly important as consumers shift to in-home consumption behaviour as they age. More than ever the in and out of home occasions appeared to be linked, supporting the importance of having a multi-channel strategy to support sustained growth."
Quotes
  • "Tim Hortons is ahead across all gender and age demographics in British Columbia, Starbucks gets is best showing among women (35%) and residents aged 18 to 34 (also 35%)."
Quotes
  • "To many of us, coffee is more than just a simple beverage. Yes, it wakes up our sleepy heads and energizes our tired bodies, but it is also an ice-breaker on a date and a life-saver for newborn parents."
From Part 06
Quotes
  • "Australia’s younger generations have a greater dependency on coffee, with around a third needing it to survive the day (33% Gen Y and 30% Gen X). By comparison the Builders generation are the most likely to see coffee as something nice to have but don’t need it (45%)."
Quotes
  • "Coffee lovers in Australia are also keen on making their own cuppa at home, and not just any instant coffee drink that takes two minutes. The average person in Australia might enrol in a professional barista courses to learn how to use their thousand dollar home coffee machine and make a good brew. Cafes such as Market Lane sell coffee beans by the kilo and anyone can try recreating a gourmet cuppa at home which in turn fuels the speciality coffee culture market here."
From Part 08
Quotes
  • "In fact, breakfast (first thing rather than mid-morning) for many in Spain consists of only coffee rather than adding any food to the mix. "
  • "It's also worth noting that coffee is drunk by and large in bars and cafeterias rather than at home. If they're at work, Spaniards will pop out for a coffee break with their colleagues and if meeting with friends they're also more likely to sit outdoors in a terraza than invite each other round their homes for a brew."