Category Research: Health + Wellness Trends

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Category Research: Health + Wellness Trends

Awareness about wellness and maintaining a healthy lifestyle is increasing in Canada. Some trends in the health and wellness industry in Canada include increased use of technology, increased consciousness on work-life balance, and better access to health and wellness products.

Increased Use of Technology

  • The use of technology in health and wellness is growing. Technology is meant to promote accuracy and offer a better overall experience.
  • Telemedicine is becoming popular and predominant in Canada to help reduce wait times.
  • Spa and wellness establishments in Canada have embraced wellness technologies.
  • Wellness apps, as well as wearable devices, are being adopted to monitor things like eating habits, fitness routines, and intake of sodium.
  • Technology is making it possible to combine health and wellness treatments with medical and non-medical treatments, specifically for weight loss, detox, and skin abnormalities.
  • There are new products, including technologically advanced equipment like massage chairs and high-tech evaluations such as muscle analyzers.
  • Technology is making it possible for one to consult with a doctor, gym instructor, or physician through a video conversation over a mobile device.
  • This is a trend because it is significantly improving the experience in wellness and health centers. Increased use of technology is driven by the need to lower the burden on the Canadian public healthcare system.
  • The ability of technology to reduce wait times in hospitals, improve wellness experience, and enhance communication between clients and providers is the reason why this trend is impacting the industry.
  • The impact of this trend in the health and wellness industry is the use of technologically advanced equipment, high-tech evaluations, and the development of digital platforms and devices.
  • Examples of companies at the forefront of the trend are Eminence and ResortSuite.

Increased Consciousness on Work-Life Balance

  • More Canadian organizations and people are focused on striking a balance between work commitments and other aspects of life.
  • Work programs are being developed to help employees mind their health and wellness, even as they attend to their work duties.
  • This is a trend because many people, particularly the aging workforce, are avoiding the rising cost of health services by escaping issues like burnout, stress, and overworking through balanced work-life that ensures their good health and wellness.
  • This trend is affecting the industry because employers are getting active in fulfilling their responsibility to ensure good health and wellness of their employees.
  • The impact of this trend is an increased number of Canadian companies in the health and wellness that are creating and implementing workplace programs that help balance work and health needs of employees.
  • Workplace programs by these companies incorporate educational, organizational, and environmental undertakings that support the health of employees and their families.
  • Investment in wellness programs and increased consciousness on work-life balance has been motivated by rising health service costs.
  • The purchase of wellness programs by businesses is increasing in an attempt to curb rising healthcare costs.
  • Examples of companies at the forefront of the trend are Fitbit and BP Canada.

Better Access to Health and Wellness Products

Research Strategy

To find information about trends in the health and wellness industry in Canada, the research team consulted reliable articles, websites, reports, and surveys. A factor was considered a trend if it is substantially affecting the operations and experience regarding health and wellness in Canada. Based on the criteria and from these resources, increased use of technology, increased consciousness on work-life balance, and better access to health and wellness products were identified as trends in the health and wellness industry in Canada.

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