CAAR

Part
01
of four
Part
01

Think Tanks, Policy Institutes, Research Institutes

Five U.S. think tanks, five U.S. policy institutes, and five U.S. research institutes have been added to the three tabs of the attached spreadsheet. Below is my methodology and summary of findings.

Methodology

As the instructions for selecting the think tanks, policy institutes, and research institutes did not provide a metric for determining the "best" or "top" organizations, I focused on several main criteria for identifying those organizations that would make the spreadsheet. To begin with, I included the organizations provided in the instructions, so the Heritage Foundation and the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) automatically made the "Think Tanks" tab, while the American Enterprise Institute (AEI) automatically made the "Policy Institutes" tab.

The think tanks were chosen first based on size (according to website traffic reported on BestSchools' "The 50 Most Influential Think Tanks in the United States") and then on political affiliation. To provide a range of political orientations, I only included the smallest independent, liberal, and Libertarian organizations. The conservative and nonpartisan organizations were provided in the instructions.

The policy institutes were selected based on founding year and diverse areas of focus. The size of these organizations was not readily apparent on websites, media mentions, or industry reports. Therefore, I attempted to only include the newest policy institutes, which have all been founded since 2000, except for the American Enterprise Institute (AEI). The AEI was founded in 1938, but was included because it was mentioned in the instructions. The five institutes all have different areas of focus in addition to four of them being newer organizations.

I struggled to find newer research institutes, as most appear to be affiliated with universities and are decades old. In addition, the size of the organizations were not apparent on websites, media mentions, or industry reports. As such, the five research institutes were all founded well before 2000, but because they represent a range of research areas that are significant departures from the areas of focus of larger research institutes, I elected to include them on the list.

Please note that much of the organizations' missions and goals are quoted verbatim on the spreadsheet in order to provide an accurate depiction of their focus and vision.

Think Tanks

The following U.S. think tanks have been entered on the "Think Tanks" tab of the attached spreadsheet:

Founded 1973
Political Orientation: Conservative
Website traffic: 279,000 monthly visitors

Founded 1921
Political Orientation: Nonpartisan
Website traffic: 147,000 monthly visitors

Founded 1978
Political Orientation: Libertarian
Website traffic: 4,900 monthly visitors

Founded 2005
Political Orientation: Liberal
Website traffic: 2,400 monthly visitors

Founded 1998
Political Orientation: Independent
Website traffic: 740 monthly visitors

Policy Institutes

Founded: 1938
Area of Focus: Human rights

Founded 2000
Area of Focus: Migration

Founded 2002
Area of Focus: Education

Founded 2004
Area of Focus: Societal issues

Founded 2012
Area of Focus: Health

Research Institutes

Founded 1945
Area of focus: Agriculture

Founded 1945
Area of focus: Oceanography

Founded 1972
Area of focus: Employment

Founded 1987

Founded 1992
Area of focus: Electric power

Conclusion

The mission statement and goals for 15 U.S. think tanks, policy institutes, and research institutes have been entered on the attached spreadsheet.
Part
02
of four
Part
02

Think Tanks

Third Way, Lexington Institute, Reason Foundation, Council on Foreign Relations, and Heritage Foundation are among the most influential think tanks and have various outputs. The Council of Foreign Relations publishes reports and papers for foreign policy experts, the academic community, and interested public and Reason Foundation has a television station and monthly print publication. The details of their size, location, political, affiliation, business model, funding, and outputs are listed in the attached spreadsheet.

HERITAGE FOUNDATION
It organizes events on different topics such as using conservative policies to improve lives of various groups in society. Its outputs also include interviews and briefings. In the year 2017, it had 5200 radio and television interviews aimed at discussing solutions founded on conservative policies, and it also provided 175 briefings for congressional and presidential candidates.

COUNCIL OF FOREIGN RELATIONS
It publishes reports, books, and papers that can be used for academic purposes and shaping foreign policy. The copies of its books and reports can be purchased from Amazon.com, and some titles include The Third Revolution by Elizabeth C. Economy, Nigeria by John Campbell and Matthew T. Page, The China Mission by Daniel Kurtz-Phelan, and The Marshall Plan by Ben Steill.

REASON FOUNDATION
As part of its output, the organization has a monthly publication called Reason Magazine and a television station that produces investigative documentaries, viral videos, and interviews.

THIRD WAY
The organization publishes press releases and organizes events on numerous topics that touch on its values of security, freedom, and opportunity. On March 14, 2018, it had a press release that focused on using broad coalitions to beat President Trump. On March 8, 2018, its press release focused on the victory of passing the Nuclear Innovation Bill.

LEXINGTON INSTITUTE
The output for the organization is published reports on logistics, energy and defense. Its last publication on defense was on March 12, 2018, and on February 26, 2018, it published a report on electric vehicles.

CONCLUSION
In conclusion, Heritage Foundation, Council on Foreign Relations, Lexington Institute, Reason Foundation and Third Way have different outputs. Heritage Foundation organizes events and has interviews and briefings, and Council of Foreign Relations publishes books and reports.

Part
03
of four
Part
03

Policy Institutes

We have added information to the Policy Insights tab of the attached spreadsheet for the following organizations:

-American Enterprise Institute
-Migration Policy Institute
-Educational Policy Institute
-Spark Policy Institute
-Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute

The details provided are: size, location, political affiliation (if applicable), business model, funding sources, and outputs.

To locate this information, we researched each organization's website (pages such as About Us, Our Mission, Our Services, Our Research, etc.). In some cases we also referred to the organization's LinkedIn profile, as well as mentions in online media clips and publications. After a thorough search through trusted media sites, reports, and excerpts from interviews, information on the public affiliation of the Educational Policy Institute, the Spark Policy Institute, and the Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute was not publicly available. One reason for that could be linked to the type of funding they receive. The Educational Policy Institute is a nonprofit organization just like the Migration Policy Institute and the American Enterprise Institute, which could suggest that they have no affiliation. On the other hand, Spark Policy Institute is privately funded, which means that picking a political position could potentially alienate some of its donators. Finally, the Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute is primarily funded by the government, which, most likely, means that they, too, have no interest in picking a political side.
Part
04
of four
Part
04

Research Institutes

We provide a complete competitive landscape for the following organizations: Noble Research Institute, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, Electric Power Research Institute, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, and Penn State Materials Research Institute. For each organization, we identify the size of the organization, location, political affiliations, business model, funding, and outputs. The full report has been compiled in the attached spreadsheet.

Findings

We found no political affiliations for any of the organizations. This may be due to there being a limited benefit for money-making entities to possibly turn-off potential customers who do not share their political views. For all other categories, we were able to provide a thorough response. Overall, most of the organizations get their funding from the government, but they also rely on private donations. They also mostly publish a variety of products, and some also provide research services for hire.

CONCLUSION

We compiled all the information in the attached spreadsheet.
Sources
Sources

From Part 01
From Part 03