Businesses That Use Light Industrial Staffing Companies

Part
01
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Part
01

Light Industrial Staffing - Demographics

In the United States, a human resources manager/recruiter who makes staffing decisions would, on average, be identified as white, female, 45 years of age, have a bachelor’s degree in either business or human resource management and earn $89,756 per annum. The staffing and recruitment industry has experienced steady growth over the past few years as more and more companies, both small and large, utilize staffing services. Research shows that more than 90% of US companies use the services provided by staffing companies.

Demographics of Human Resources Managers/Recruiters Who Take Staffing Decisions

Age

  • According to DataUSA, the average age of human resources managers in the United States is 44.6 years old. Managers and recruiters over 40 years of age comprise 67% of the country’s human resources workforce. Additionally, over 7% of all HR managers are aged in the range of 20-30 years and about 26% of them are aged between 30-40 years.
  • The average age of a male human resources manager is 43.9 years while the average female manager is 45.2 years old.

Gender

  • There are more female HR professionals and recruiters than their male counterparts. According to the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics, in 2020, 76.8% of all human resources managers are women. Also, according to Zippia’s demographic studies, 67.5% of the total HR population are women while 28.9% are men.
  • Based on the statistics presented by DataUSA, in 2018, there were 171,000 male HR managers (41.5%) and 239,000 female HR managers (58.5%).

Ethnicity

  • According to the BLS database, over 287,000 human resources managers were employed in 2020. Of these managers, 81% are White (non-Hispanic), 12% are African American, 4.9% are Asian, and 14% are Latino/Hispanic.
  • In comparison, statistics presented by DataUSA indicate the most common ethnicity for this profession is White and Non-Hispanic (67.3%). The breakdown of ethnicity for human resources managers is indicated below,
    • White and non-Hispanic = 67.3%
    • White and Hispanic = 10.1%
    • African Americans = 9.3%
    • American Indian = 0.38%
    • Native Hawaiian = 0.17%

Income

  • The average annual salary of human resources managers is $90,594. The average annual salary for male managers is about $95,280 while their female counterparts earn $89,756, on average, in 2020.
  • According to Zippia’s demographic study, Asian and White male managers earn more than African Americans and Hispanic managers.
    • Asian male managers = $101,489 per annum
    • Asian female managers = $95,605 per annum
    • White male managers = $95,456 per annum
    • White female managers = $89,922 per annum
    • Hispanic male managers = $96,508 per annum
    • Hispanic female managers = $88,088 per annum
    • African American male managers = $92,341 per annum
    • African American female managers = $86,988 per annum
  • The average annual salary for human resource managers/recruiters in Atlanta, GA is $67,000.
  • The average annual salary for human resources managers/recruiters in New Orleans, LA is $46,000.
  • The average annual salary for human resources managers/recruiters in Kissimmee, FL is $64,500.
  • The average annual salary for human resources managers/recruiters in Memphis, TN is $66,000.

Title and Designation

  • Several human resources positions can be categorized into entry-level, mid-level, and upper-level job titles. The most common positions in a company’s HR department that deal with recruitment are recruiting coordinator, HR manager, HR generalist, HR coordinator, HR director, recruiting manager, HR specialist, HR assistant, HR VP, and HR director.
  • A recruiting coordinator, in the United States, on average, is 27 years old, earns $60,158 per annum, and maintains an average tenure of 1.04 years in a company.
  • An HR Generalist, in the United States, on average, is 32 years old, earns $64,790 per annum, and maintains an average tenure of 1.96 years in a company.
  • An HR Coordinator, in the United States, on average, is 30 years old, earns $49,579 per annum, and maintains an average tenure of 2.34 years in a company.
  • An HR Director, in the United States, on average, is 42 years old, earns $138,929 per annum, and maintains an average tenure of 3.37 years in a company.
  • A Recruiting Manager, in the United States, on average, is 38 years old, earns $109,627 per annum, and maintains an average tenure of 2.7 years in a company.
  • An HR Specialist, in the United States, on average, is 32 years old, earns $52,760 per annum, and maintains an average tenure of 2.54 years in a company.
  • An HR Assistant, in the United States, on average, is 33 years old, earns $40,853 per annum, and maintains an average tenure of 2.39 years in a company.
  • An HR Director, in the United States, on average, is 42 years old, earns $109,181 per annum, and maintains an average tenure of 4.02 years in a company.

Other Insights

  • According to Zippia, over 33% of the country’s HR managers enjoy working at one place for 1-2 years. About 21% of HR managers ideally work for 3-4 years at their job, 17% of them work for 5-7 years, 6% work for 8-10 years, and over 12% of HR managers tend to stay for more than 11 years.
  • Based on the type of industry, it has been found that over 28% of HR managers are concentrated in Fortune 500 companies, 15% belong to the retail industry, 12% are in manufacturing, 8% are in the technology sector, and 5% belong to the healthcare industry.
  • Human resources managers are quite diverse and commonly, speak more than one language. Zippia’s demographic study shows that over 62.7% of HR managers in the US can speak in Spanish and 8.2% of them know French as a foreign language. Over 4.1% can speak in Portuguese, 4.1% know German, and 2.8% know Russian.

Research Strategy

An extensive search was conducted through government databases such as the Bureau of Labor Statistics, national statistics databases such as DataUSA, national organizations databases such as the American Staffing Association (ASA), recruitment platform websites such as Zippia, and Payscale, and industry-specific media reports. While demographic information on business owners, recruitment professionals, and human resources managers who are responsible for making staffing decisions is widely available, information specific to professionals who use light industrial staffing companies is unavailable. Additionally, the research team was able to find information for a single demographic factor alone — income — that’s specific to the requested states (Atlanta, New Orleans, Kissimmee, and Memphis). Therefore, we expanded our search to include demographic information on recruitment managers that make staffing decisions, in general, in the United States.

Part
02
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Part
02

Light Industrial Staffing - Psychographics

This brief highlights the psychographics of business owners and managers in the select cities that use light industrial staffing companies when looking for temporary staffing. The traits include courage, passion, diligence, strong vision, high level of persuasion, confidence, willingness to sacrifice, aspire to be great leaders, have a high-risk profile, and have good self-awareness. Other psychographics include organization skills, meticulous attention to detail, and the ability to multitask effectively.

Atlanta Georgia

New Orleans, Louisiana.

Kissimmee, FL and Memphis, TN

  • According to Forbes, business owners globally have the following psychographic traits: courage, passion, diligence, strong vision, high level of persuasion, confidence, willingness to sacrifice, aspire to be great leaders, have a high-risk profile, and have good self-awareness.
  • We concluded that since the psychographic traits highlighted by Forbes are global, they do apply to business owners in Kissimmee, FL, and Memphis, TN who use light industrial staffing companies when looking for temporary staffing.
Part
03
of six
Part
03

Light Industrial Staffing - Manufacturing Client Persona

Emma is acutely aware of the stiff competition their business faces within the manufacturing industry and therefore seeks to find, train and develop new employees during the current workforce shortage in the industry. She also struggles to retrain and retain talent already engaged in the business.

Faces Stiff Competition within Manufacturing Industry

  • Manufacturing businesses are facing significantly increasing global competition. This calls for manufacturers to therefore be able to successfully compete with international firms to attract a finite number of exceptional talent and innovators.
  • The substantially lower labor costs paid by manufacturers outside the Western world forces business owners/managers to do everything possible to increase productivity and output levels in order to remain competitive in the global marketplace.
  • Almost 70% of tech company HR executives recognize the need for workforce transformation, such as increased productivity and output levels. Capacity, culture, and capability are considered the top barriers to transformation.

Seeks to Find, Train and Develop New Talent

  • The manufacturing workforce is shrinking. This is due to a variety of factors such as "too few graduates educated in STEM disciplines, an outdated reputation of workplaces that aren’t safe, clean, or progressive, as well as the misconception by younger generations that manufacturing lacks competitive wages, innovation, and sophistication."
  • With 1.4 million U.S. manufacturing jobs being long in March and April 2020 combined, workers in the manufacturing industry have become restless and are "looking to move quickly through things rather than spend the time to become skilled in the position."
  • Business owners/managers are therefore pressed to find, train and develop new employees

Struggling to Retrain and Retain Talent

  • Given the skills gap currently being experienced in the manufacturing industry, business owners/managers are struggling to retain and retrain their existing employees.
  • Businesses are therefore revamping their employee development plans. One of them, Kapco has had their HR team restructure its employee development plan to run over a period of 24-36 months and spells out how workers can develop their skills as well as boost their compensation over the long term. This has resultantly reduced turnover and increased employee engagement and communication.
  • Kapco's recruiters track progress of new hires early on and try to identify potential problems. The company also uses a buddy program, pairing more-experienced workers with new employees to help them assimilate faster.

RESEARCH STRATEGY

To develop client personas of business owners/managers in the manufacturing industry that use light industrial staffing companies when looking for temporary staffing, we searched through human resource magazines, market research reports and manufacturing industry expert platforms.
The client persona we created is a female business owner/manager named Emma, in line with the demographic statistics provided previously in a portion of this research. The business owners/managers that make staffing decisions would, on average, be identified as white, female and 45 years of age.
Information on manufacturing industry business owners/managers that use light industrial staffing companies when looking for temporary staffing was not expressly available. However, the compiled demographic statistics further indicated that more than 90% of US companies use the services provided by staffing companies, leading us to cluster manufacturing business owners/managers as part of the majority of businesses that use light industrial staffing companies when looking for temporary staffing.
Part
04
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Part
04

Light Industrial Staffing - Food Processing Client Persona

Business owners and managers in the food processing sector in locations around Atlanta (GA), New Orleans (LA), Kissimmee (FL) Memphis (TN) are becoming worried. They are concerned about a decline in employment and workplace safety challenges. They are turning to freelance marketplaces (through light industrial staffing companies like Robert Half Technology) to fill vacant positions.

Worried About Decline in Employment

  • A review of challenges affecting the "temporary-labor market" of the United States reveals a ten-year low in the number of temporary and contract employees.
  • The number of temporary and contract employees dropped to two million in April 2020. Employers of labor in the "food processing" sector are among the employers perturbed by this new trend.
  • Food processing business owners and managers (including managers from Fresno) have turned to locations like Atlanta (GA), New Orleans (LA), Kissimmee (FL), Memphis (TN), seeking employable staff to settle their worries about declining employment.

Worried About Workplace Safety

  • Employers of labor in the "food processing" sector (like in other American society sectors) are worried about workplace safety. Issues related to workplace safety have caused a decline in the available workforce.
  • Food processing business owners and managers in American states (like Memphis, TN) are becoming worried about workplace safety. Agricenter now monitors recommendations made by the CDC and Shelby County Health Department due to COVID-19 in the Memphis, TN, region.
  • In March 2020, the CDC issued regulations limiting "gatherings to 50 people" or less. This development led to the shutdown of markets for processed foods like the Agricenter's Expo Center and Farmer's Market because they require a gathering of more than 50 people to function.

Turning to Freelance Marketplaces To Fill Positions

  • Following the impact of COVID-19, employers of labor in the "food processing" sector (like in other sectors within the American society) are turning to freelance marketplaces to fill vacant positions.
  • Several light industrial staffing companies within Atlanta (GA), New Orleans (LA), Kissimmee (FL), Memphis (TN) to hire freelancers in the accounting, financial, administrative, office, technology, and IT sectors are now getting requests from business owners and managers. These managers are worried about labor shortages in the food processing sector. One such company (Robert Half) recently received a request from Fresno, CA, seeking an agriculture AV freelance operator to operate and develop excellent autonomous agriculture machinery for various customers for different tasks.
Part
05
of six
Part
05

Light Industrial Staffing - True Pain Points

Temporary staffing agencies help outside businesses fill positions within the company for a short period. The American Staffing Association says that there are more than 3 million temporary and contract workers work for staffing companies in America during an average week and 17 million during a typical year. However, one of the biggest challenges light industrial staffing companies face has to do with people and staffing. With a massive shortage of skilled workers in the United States, it's no wonder why there are staffing issues.

Pain Point #1:Candidate Driven Market.

  • There are fewer candidates available than open jobs. It can be seen in every light industrial staffing company all the way to high-end engineering or technology staffing firms to those filling blue-collar jobs.
  • There aren’t enough temporal staff with the right skills to fill all the open positions.
  • Additionally, candidates have more control than ever when it comes to technology that connects them with potential jobs.
  • All this to say, candidates hold all the cards right now, which is a change from the past. If the company is not focused on creating the best experience possible for the candidates, they will take their business elsewhere.

Pain Point #2: Applicant Dishonesty

  • Successful business owners/managers take the time and expense of adequately screening staff members.
  • This is an important step of maintaining a qualified staffing agency to assure clients (employers) that the people coming from the agency are competent and can step in without much training to get the job done.
  • The temporary staff becomes the means that an agency is evaluated. However, applicants desperate for work may lie about skills and experience, hoping to put them on a higher pay scale or top of the talent pool list.
  • Previous employers need to be called to validate work history. This is a time-consuming process that is easily overlooked in times of extreme demand.

Pain Point #3: Lost Productivity From Employee Turnover

  • Finding and keeping the right workers for your job is a critical part of any organization.
  • Depending on the position, the cost to onboard and prep skilled labor can be in the tens of thousands of dollars — when these workers up and leave the issue can create a bottleneck with work deliverables.
  • Besides, projects are running smoothly, and any downtime resulting from lost labor directly affects an organization's revenue and the people who need to react, like owners and hiring managers.

Research Strategy

An extensive search was conducted through several government databases such as the American Staffing Association, as well as popular staffing agencies in the U.S. While demographic information on business owners, recruitment professionals, and human resources managers who are responsible for making staffing decisions is widely available, information specific to professionals who use light industrial staffing companies is unavailable in the specified states, which are; Atlanta, GA; New Orleans, LA; Kissimmee, FL; Memphis, TN. Additionally, the research conducted found helpful information for general pain points that business owners face when looking for temporary staffing in the United States that were also assumed to affect the requested states (Atlanta, New Orleans, Kissimmee, and Memphis). Therefore, we expanded our search to include demographic information on business owners and managers who look for temporal staffing, in general, in the United States.
Part
06
of six
Part
06

Light Industrial Staffing - Messaging Best Practices

Best practices for messaging tailored to the pain points identified include leveraging social platforms content in r, pushing employer brand and designing messaging with candidate persona in mind.

Leveraging Social Platforms Content in Recruitment

  • Happy Faces Personnel Group, a recruiting agency, advocates for harnessing the power of multiple social channels during recruiting to attract top talent and states that recruiters and staffing agencies in Atlanta do it "all day, every day."
  • Social recruiting has gained popularity and is now used by 84% of organizations. Every post is used to directly or indirectly highlight what the hiring company stands for, giving potential employees a snapshot into what it feels like to work for it.
  • These posts and content put a spotlight on the company’s culture. Given the candidate driven market and limited number of temporal staff with the right skills to fill open positions, post on social platforms are now tailored to attract passive job candidates making up the temporal staff hiring pool.

Pushing Employer Brand

  • A positive employer brand in today’s highly competitive job market puts a recruiting company ahead in the war for talents. The brand can be communicated through blogs by both employees and recruiters, as ell as having brand ambassadors such as employees.
  • In a bid to recruit hard-to-find technical talent in Atlanta, Pandora created an end-to-end engagement campaign to promote an event they hosted and it outperformed expectations. Their messaging strategy through their brand as an employer was boosted within the limited talent pool.

Designing Messaging with Candidate Persona in Mind

  • Defining the ideal candidate persona prior to the launch of marketing and recruiting efforts saves recruiters time by ensuring the campaigns are highly tailored to the potential staff they want to attract.
  • Using candidate personas to design recruitment messaging ensures the attraction of more sustainable job candidates thereby increasing employee retention.

RESEARCH STRATEGY

To identify best practices for messaging tailored to the pain point identified, we searched through business magazines, market analysis reports, recruiting agency websites and human resource expert platforms. We were able to identify some practices from the sources selected.

Research proposal:

Only the project owner can select the next research path.
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