Biomechanical Connection - Pes Planus & Same-Sided Inguinal Hernia

Part
01
of one
Part
01

Biomechanical Connection - Pes Planus & Same-Sided Inguinal Hernia

We could not find any medical research studies that show a relationship between acquired pes planus (or flat foot) and the formation of an inguinal hernia (or groin hernia) on the same side of the body. All the research studies that discussed acquired pes planus (or flat foot) did not include any connection with inguinal hernia (or groin hernia) or sports pubalgia (or athletic pubalgia or sports hernia).

Highlights

Research Strategy

To obtain medical research studies that show a relationship between pes planus (or flat foot) and the formation of an inguinal hernia (or groin hernia) on the same side of the body, we looked through various scientific studies, medical journals, and medical articles from sites such as Science Direct, Research Gate, Medline Plus, Nature, Medical News Today, NCBI, PubMed, and other similar sources. We focused on acquired pes planus rather than congenital pes planus. We also included studies that were conducted before 2019 as there were no recent studies on the subject. However, we were not able to find any scientific studies and medical journals that show a relationship between acquired pes planus (or flat foot) and the formation of an inguinal hernia (or groin hernia) on the same side of the body.
We then searched for research studies that discuss acquired pes planus (or flat foot), hoping to find instances where references were made to inguinal hernia (or groin hernia) and sports pubalgia (or athletic pubalgia or sports hernia). This strategy did not also yield any relevant results.
We also searched for research studies that discuss inguinal hernia (or groin hernia) and sports pubalgia (or athletic pubalgia or sports hernia) but there were no references to acquired pes planus (or flat foot).
We proceeded to scour through clinical studies or trials in the Clinical Trials Registry site, pharmaceutical companies' websites, and other sources. We hoped to find ongoing studies or research on medications or conditions where the relationship between pes planus (or flat foot) and the formation of an inguinal hernia (or groin hernia) on the same side of the body is being evaluated. We only found a "trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of local anesthetic Chloroprocaine at two different concentrations (at 1% and 2%) in a pediatric population subjected to peripheral nerve block due to Inguinal hernia repair or Flat foot surgery". The trial did not show any relationship between the two conditions and it seems to be focused on congenital flat foot.
We also looked for interviews or surveys involving doctors who are involved in treating or diagnosing pes planus (or flat foot) and inguinal hernia (or groin hernia) to determine if there is any information on the relationship between these two conditions. However, we did not find any information stating any connection between the two conditions.
We have, therefore, determined that there are no medical research studies that show a relationship between acquired pes planus (or flat foot) and the formation of an inguinal hernia (or groin hernia) on the same side of the body.



Sources
Sources