Biomechanic Connection Between Pes Planus and Same Sided Inguinal Hernia

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Biomechanic Connection Between Pes Planus and Same Sided Inguinal Hernia

We were not able to find scientific studies and medical journals that specifically state the biomechanic connection between pes planus (flat foot / fallen arch) deformity and same-sided inguinal hernia development. What we found were several studies and articles about various types of genetic mutations and diseases in young patients that cause them to develop sets of symptoms such as inguinal hernia in general and pes planus (flat foot / fallen arch) deformities. Based on the research, "Diagnosis of Mucopolysaccharidosis Based on History and Clinical Features: Evidence from the Bajio Region of Mexico, hernias, flat feet, joint rigidity, and keen misalignment" were observed in patients with mucopolysaccharoidosis (MPS). The rest of the relevant medical reports and findings were presented below.

Diagnosis of Mucopolysaccharidosis Based on History and Clinical Features: Evidence from the Bajio Region of Mexico

  • Most of these patients were diagnosed using clinical and radiological assessments. The findings were further strengthened by an enzymatic study.

National Fragile X Foundation Article

National Organization of Rare Disorders Report

  • According to the National Organization of Rare Disorders, patients that are afflicted with the Freeman Sheldon Syndrome disease tend to develop sets of abnormalities such as inguinal hernia and foot malformation.

GRIN2B Clinical Data

Medline Plus Article

  • According to an article from Medline Plus, individuals with caudal regression syndrome (CRS) typically suffer from various impairments in the lower half of their bodies. Some of the accompanying problems include feet malformations and inguinal hernias.

Article from a Rheumatology Physician

  • Based on an article from a rheumatology physician, those with joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) typically develop sets of conditions such as inguinal hernias and flat foot problems.

Research Strategy

To obtain medical studies that show the biomechanic connection between pes planus (flat foot / fallen arch) deformity and same-sided inguinal hernia development, we looked through various scientific studies, medical journals, and medical articles from sites such as Science Direct, Research Gate, Medline Plus, Nature, Medical News Today, NCBI, PubMed, and other similar sources. Based on this search approach, we were not able to find scientific studies and medical journals that specifically state the biomechanic connection between pes planus (flat foot / fallen arch) deformity and same-sided inguinal hernia development. What we found were several studies and articles about various types of genetic mutations and diseases in young patients that cause them to develop sets of symptoms such as inguinal hernia in general and pes planus (flat foot / fallen arch) deformities. These gene mutations seem to link the occurrences of these two conditions. We then presented these articles above as the closest ones we could find that can link these two conditions.

We also looked through clinical studies or trials in the Clinical Trials Registry site, pharmaceutical companies' websites, and other sources. We hoped to find ongoing studies or research on medications or conditions where the biomechanic connection between pes planus (flat foot / fallen arch) deformity and same-sided inguinal hernia development is being evaluated. However, we were not able to find any research or reports that attempt to evaluate this connection. What we found were some medications being tested on patients that have flat foot problems or inguinal hernia. There were no concrete reasons stated why the testing is being done for patients with these two conditions.

We also looked for interviews or surveys involving doctors who are involved in treating or diagnosing pes planus (flat foot / fallen arch) deformity and same-sided inguinal hernia development to determine if they have stated any connection between these two conditions. However, what we found was their diagnosis of some gene-related diseases that result in these two conditions. However, they did not state any biomechanic connection between the two specific symptoms.

Some of the medical articles and reports found were also slightly outdated. Since there were no recent conflicting updates on the findings, we also included the relevant reports that somehow connect the two given conditions.
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