Autonomous Transportation

Part
01
of two
Part
01

Autonomous Transportation Company Leaders

The top leading companies in the Autonomous transportation industry are Waymo, General Motors, Daimler, and Aptiv. Waymo is expected to have a revenue of approximately $10 million by 2025. Conversely, GM is valued at $19 billion.

WAYMO

GENERAL MOTORS — CRUISE AUTOMATION

  • GM acquired Cruise Automation in 2016 for $1 billion, which marked the commencement of its self-driving efforts.
  • The company has a valuation of $19 billion.
  • GM has an annual budget of $1 billion and $3.35 billion in cash investments.
  • The company's key partner is SoftBank, which plans to invest $2.25 billion in GM'S Cruise Automation.
  • GM's Cruise Automation recently postponed its launch to beyond 2019 because additional testing of the vehicles was required.

DAIMLER

  • Daimler is headquartered in Stuttgart, Germany and has an annual budget of $900 million.
  • Daimler recently recorded a loss of $1.74 billion in the second quarter of 2019.
  • The company's goal is to launch a passenger service solution that is shared, autonomous, and electric.
  • Daimler expects large-scale commercial production to take off between 2020 and 2025.

APTIV PLC

RESEARCH STRATEGY

To compile a list of leading companies in the autonomous transportation industry, we first looked for the top-rated and top-ranked companies on media platforms such as Forbes and Bloomberg. We used these lists to select the top companies by looking at their financial position, future projections, partners, strategy, and annual budget. It is noteworthy that the revenue of these companies were not publicly available. The companies selected are deemed to have the highest levels of valuation, stability and safety.
Part
02
of two
Part
02

Autonomous Transportation Country Leaders

The top 5 countries that are leading the Autonomous transportation industry are the Netherlands, Singapore, the United States, Sweden, and the United Kingdom.

The Netherlands

  • The Netherlands was ranked first in the 2018 Autonomous Vehicles Readiness Index.
  • The country is known for its well-maintained road network, which was rated as being among the world’s best by the World Economic Forum and the World Bank.
  • The country has the highest density of electrical vehicle charging points and comes second only to Singapore in consumer acceptance. It is the highest of the 20 in WEF’s technology readiness rating and among the highest in KPMG’s assessment of societal change readiness.
  • The Netherlands was ranks the highest in regulations and government investment in AV infrastructure.
  • The country has by far the highest percentage usage of electric vehicles of the 20 countries, at 6.39% in 2016, nearly double compared to the second-placed Sweden. It also has a high number of AV companies based in the country on a population-adjusted basis.

Singapore

  • In the KPMG report, Singapore topped on policy, legislation and consumer acceptance pillars. It emerged second only to the Netherlands on infrastructure.
  • According to the report, Singapore received the maximum score on regulation, with a 2017 amendment to its Road Traffic Act allowing self-driving vehicles to be tested on public roads, and a single entity to coordinate AV work.(Source #1, Corroborated by 2 and 3)
  • The country’s strong scores for infrastructure, including a very high road and mobile network quality, are only undermined by a low density of charging stations for electric vehicles. (Source #1)
  • Singapore fails to attain the top spot because of its average performance on technology and innovation. It lacks technology company headquarters, patents, and investments. It also has a low use of electric cars.

United States

  • The US leads on AV innovations, ranking the first in the technology thanks to its 163-company headquarters.
  • US scored the maximum or near-maximum points on industry partnerships, research and development hubs, AV technology company headquarters, investment, technology availability and capacity for innovation.
  • Industry movers and shakers like Detroit, Uber and Lyft are based in the US. The country has also attracted companies from other countries like Japan’s Toyota, which has a $1 billion research hub in Michigan and a testing proving ground in California.
  • The US has a good score on consumer acceptance, boosted by strong ratings from KPMG’s Change Readiness Index and the WEF. It is, however, undermined by low levels of acceptance of AV technology by consumers in addition to the fact that despite its 23 test locations being the largest number of any country, only a small proportion of Americans use them.

Sweden

  • Sweden has a similar overall score as the US and ranks between second and eighth across the pillars.
  • It is strongest in the technology and innovation pillar, where it has the highest per capita number of AV company headquarters, a strong showing on AV investments, and has one of the highest ratings from the WEF for availability of the latest technology.
  • Although the country also has the second-highest electric car share of the 20 countries, 3.41%, it scores low on industry partnerships, R&D hubs and patents.
  • On policy and legislation, Sweden has one of the highest government capability scores from KPMG’s Change Readiness Index research, but lower ratings on AV-specific areas.

United Kingdom

  • UK rates in the top five for three pillars, but 10th on infrastructure. On technology and innovation, the country has good scores on industry partnerships and research and development hubs, as well as high ratings from the WEF on both technology availability and capacity for innovation, although it has fewer AV patents than other leading nations.
  • It has among the highest ratings from KPMG’s Change Readiness Index and the WEF on consumer acceptance, although its ratings for the proportion of people living in test areas is lower.
  • The UK is near the top in policy and legislation, with the Department for Transport having determined that it is legal for driverless cars to operate on any public roads without permits or extra insurance.
  • Its rating across this pillar is lowered by fewer government-funded AV pilots and the government capability towards autonomous vehicles.
Sources
Sources

From Part 01
Quotes
  • "“At Waymo, we’ve driven more than 10 million miles in the real world, and over 10 billion miles in simulation,” Waymo CTO Dmitri Dolgov told TechCrunch’s Kirsten Korosec on the Sessions: Mobility stage. "
Quotes
  • "The CPUC allows us to participate in their pilot program, giving Waymo employees the ability to hail our vehicles and bring guests on rides within our South Bay territory"
  • "Instead, this gives Waymo permission to use its self-driving vehicles — which are the Chrysler Pacifica hybrid minivans and eventually the Jaguar I-PACE electric vehicle — to transport people."
From Part 02
Quotes
  • "The Netherlands emerged as the clear leader — it is within the top four of each of the four pillars and ranked number one on infrastructure, largely because of its well-maintained road network which is rated as being among the world’s best by the World Economic Forum and the World Bank. It also has by far the highest density of electrical vehicle charging points, more than Japan’s. The country comes second only to Singapore in consumer acceptance, and is the highest of the 20 in WEF’s technology readiness rating, among the highest in KPMG’s assessment of societal change readiness."
Quotes
  • "The Netherlands is the clear leaderin this first Autonomous Vehicles Readiness Index. It is within the top four of each of the four pillars and ranked number one on infrastructure, most likely due to its heavily-used, well-maintained road network, rated as being among the world’s best by the World Economic Forum and the World Bank. It also has by far the highest density of electrical vehicle charging points, with 26,789 publicly-available points in 2016 according to the International Energy Agency’s Global EV Outlook — more than Japan has for a road network more than eight times the length. The Netherlands also has high-quality wireless networks too. "
Quotes
  • "The Netherlands, ranked number one for a second year, is working with neighbors to adopt AV technology for freight, with a plan to launch platoons of more than 100 driverless trucks on major routes from Amsterdam to Antwerp and Rotterdam to the Ruhr valley. With a leading university, second-ranked Singapore has created a test town for driverless vehicles complete with traffic lights, bus stops, skyscrapers and a rain machine to recreate its extremely wet, tropical weather."