Asset Allocation Games

Part
01
of three
Part
01

Asset Allocation Games, Part 1

Top games, tools, websites and simulation software that teach asset allocation and stock investment to teenagers include the Stock Market Game, Investopedia Simulator, and How the Market Works. A summary of our findings and our research strategy are detailed below. Additionally, all the information has been compiled in rows 3-5 of the attached spreadsheet.


EXAMPLE #1: HOW THE MARKET WORKS AND PERSONAL FINANCIAL LABS

Overview


Metrics of Success


Pros


Cons


EXAMPLE #2: INVESTOPEDIA STOCK SIMULATOR

Overview

  • It is an investment simulation game suitable for beginners and other levels of players, which offers users the option to customize games and guides to teach investment and stock trading.


Metrics of Success


Pros


Cons



EXAMPLE #3: THE STOCK MARKET GAME

Overview


Metrics of Success


Pros


Cons

  • The mobile version of the game has been experiencing several technical issues including unresponsive interface, difficulty to register and log in and frequent crashes.

RESEARCH STRATEGY

Strategy #1

To provide sufficient information to answer the client's question, the research team began by looking for precompiled press releases, articles, industry reports, featured stories, publications and the like on the top and popular games, websites, tools, or simulation software that teach about asset allocation. We leveraged reputable databases, news providers, and other relevant sites like MarketWatch, Deloitte, Forbes, Investopedia, Pew Research, the New York Times, and so on. We found some games like Chasing Returns (The Asset Allocation Game) and the game, but there was neither information as to their success metrics in the United States particularly nor clear success metrics for the teenage group.


Strategy #2

Secondly, we switched to looking for articles, press releases, featured stories, and other related data points on the best methods used to teach teenagers asset allocation. With this, we expected to find games, simulation apps, software, and other relevant tools which we could carry out analyze extensively to obtain the information required and confirm their popularity. For this, we utilized trusted websites, databases and the like from professionals like those mentioned above and more. This provided more information on investment, stock market and money management tools than asset allocation. Only a few tidbits of advice and the like were directly related to asset allocation.


Strategy #3

Thirdly, we decided to consider the top financial games based on relevant success metrics. We hoped to find games among the list that were directly related to asset allocation and proceed to analyze each of them for our list. We leveraged reputable databases and industry websites like Game Informer, GameRadar, Metacritic, GameSpot, Deloitte, MarketWatch, and Inc amongst others. Again, this generated more information on investment, stock market and money management tools than asset allocation.


Strategy #4

Then we looked into the example given, iWealth Asset Allocation Game in order to search for similar games and compare top metrics. We leveraged reputable databases, company and product overview tools like Bloomberg, SimilarWeb, Google Play, Apple App Store, and so on. This also was not successful because although we found more popular and better-rated games, tools and apps like the game Rich Portfolios and The Wealth, despite our careful analysis, there was neither information as to their success metrics in the United States particularly, nor any tangibly clear success metrics. This deduction was due to the fact that most reviews for these games were from non-American users and the number of downloads hasn't exceeded 2000.

Our previous strategies showed that more information may be available on investment and stock market tools, games, and simulation software than asset allocation. Therefore, we dug deep into the concept of asset allocation to establish the direct relationship between asset allocation, stock market, and investment. From the information provided by several sources including Investor.gov and Investopedia, we were made to understand that asset allocation entails sharing investments among various assets which include stocks, cash, and bonds. From this, we could conclude that stock investment sharing could be used to replace asset allocation without being incorrect. Therefore, we proceeded to repeat the strategies above for investment instead of asset allocation. This strategy was very successful and it provided us with sufficient information from which we put together our list as presented. However, we could not find the pros and cons of the games.

After locating the games on our list, we focused on obtaining the pros and cons of each. We tried looking for product overviews, reviews, ratings or profiles on reputable databases and industry sites including ConsumerReports.org, Yahoo Finance, Top Ten Reviews, TrustRadius, and so on. We did not find any precomputed information on the pros and cons. Therefore, we resorted to extracting pros and cons from other sources like blogs, forums, and other reputable sources. We searched for positive and negative views on these games from their descriptions and customers’ feedback. From here, we picked the most recurring disadvantages as cons and advantages or positive features as pros.

We were unable to satisfy the research criteria for asset allocation. Therefore, we decided to dive into asset allocation for other suitable words and concepts that directly relate to the concept. We prepared our findings as presented in rows 3-5 of the attached spreadsheet.
Part
02
of three
Part
02

Asset Allocation Games, Part 2

Some examples of games, websites, tools, or software demonstrations that simulate and teach about asset allocation are STAX, Gen i Revolution, and Little Traders Two. The requested information is provided in the attached spreadsheet.

1. STAX

  • STAX is an online investing game designed by the non-profit organization, NexGen Personal Finance, for teens and young adults.
  • This game can simulate 20 years worth of investing in only 20 minutes.
  • Players are provided with a "monthly income" that they are able to use to invest in stocks, bonds, and a variety of other assets.
  • The game can be played in a single-player mode or in a class or group where players can compete against one another.

REASON FOR CHOOSING STAX

  • STAX is the newest released game for educating individuals on asset allocation and is presented in a multitude, if not all articles, as the superior game choice when compared to the Stock Market Game, the previous game of choice.
  • Since its release, numerous articles on the disruption in Wall Street by STAX have surfaced, making the game widely popular and the commonly seen within media outlets.
  • STAX was chosen based on the multitude of aforementioned articles found, which mentioned STAX and its success, and which also contained quotes from experts verifying this success and/or popularity.

2. GEN i REVOLUTION

  • Gen i Revolution is a game designed by the Council for Economic Education for those between the ages of six and twelve.
  • This game is structured through the completion of 21 lessons taught through fifteen different "financial rescue missions."
  • Each mission is estimated to take about 30 minutes to complete.
  • Gen i Revolution was developed specifically for educating students in middle and high school.

REASON FOR CHOOSING GEN i REVOLUTION

  • Gen i Revolution is still recommended and showcased on the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission website for use by school systems in educating students on the subject of investing.
  • In addition, this game remains the top investment game promoted by its developers at the Council for Economic Education, the leading organization on the economic and financial education of students in the United States. This information verifies the educational system's loyalty to this game, and the ongoing use of this game by school systems in the United States to educate students on investing and asset allocation.

3. LITTLE TRADERS 2

  • Little Traders 2 was developed by Tradimo, an online training school that offers free financial training.
  • Set in the 1920s, this stock market game aims to educate individuals of all ages on how to invest and trade without risking their own personal finance.
  • Currently, Little Traders 2 is available on the Google Play and App Store for use on Android and Apple devices, respectively.
  • Players have the option to take on clients or buy and sell stocks, hire traders, and compete against friends with their own personal finances.
  • This game uses a unique algorithm that enables it to show realistic stock prices.

REASON FOR CHOOSING TRADERS 2

RESEARCH STRATEGY

Research successfully identified three examples of games, websites, tools, or software demonstrations that stimulate and/or teach about asset allocation as STAX, Gen i Revolution, and Little Traders 2. To identify examples meeting the criteria of games, websites, tools, or software demonstrations that stimulate and/or teach about asset allocation, extensive research using databases containing case studies and articles from various media outlets, databases containing market research, and databases containing educational resources most commonly used by teachers, were all utilized and included in a deep dive.

Research began by seeking out any precompiled lists containing examples of games, websites, tools, or software demonstrations that stimulate and/or teach about asset allocation. Sites hosting databases most commonly known for containing case studies and/or articles from various reputable news and media outlets were utilized in this attempt at uncovering precompiled information. While this information was not found to exist, these databases did prove helpful in uncovering articles published by market research outlets such as MarketWatch. The articles discovered provided the research team with valuable data pertaining to two of the examples of games, websites, tools, or software demonstrations that stimulate and/or teach about asset allocation provided above.

With this information, we continued the research, this time by performing a deep dive into educational databases most commonly known for containing information and resources useful for teachers in educating students on investing and the stock market. Sites hosting such databases included in this deep dive were similar to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. This provided the research team with the third example of a game, website, tool, or software demonstration that simulates and/or teaches about asset allocation.


Part
03
of three
Part
03

Asset Allocation Games, Part 3

Some examples of games, websites, tool, or software demonstrations that simulate and teach about asset allocation are Stock trainer, Best broker, and Wall street survivor. The requested information is provided in the attached spreadsheet.  

1. Wall Street Survivor.

2. Stock Trainer

3. Best Broker

  • Users get who log in for the first time receive $25,000 which can be used to buy and sell real-time stocks.
  • Users also have the added feature of playing ETFs (Exchange Traded Funds), funds, bonds, and digital currency like Bitcoin, Litecoin, among others.

RESEARCH STRATEGY

To compiled examples of games, websites, tools, or software demonstrations that simulate/teach about asset allocation, a search of various databases ranging from market research to tech reports was utilized to composed and arrive at best possible findings.

First, we tried to understand the concept of asset allocation. From the information provided by several sources, we were made to understand that asset allocation entails sharing investments among various assets which include stocks, cash, and bonds. From these findings, we were able to conclude that stock investment sharing could be correctly used to replace asset allocation without changing the scope of the research. Armed with this information, we then proceeded to commence our research.

We commenced the research by scouring through reports for a precompiled lists that contained information, examples, and reviews of the top games, websites, tools, or software demonstrations that stimulate and/or teach about asset allocation(stock investment sharing). Sites hosting databases most commonly known for containing case studies and/or articles from various reputable news and media outlets were utilized in this attempt at uncovering precompiled information. The articles found on this search provided the research team with valuable data pertaining to some games and websites that simulate/teach about stock investment sharing.

From the examples given, we were sure to exclude the websites and apps that have been used in the previous two research. Then, we focused on obtaining the pros and cons of each of the apps and websites. We also tried looking for product overviews, reviews, ratings or profiles on reputable databases. We did not find any precomputed information on the pros and cons. Therefore, we resorted to extracting the pros and cons from other sources like blogs, forums among others. We searched for positive and negative views of these games from their descriptions and customers’ feedback on play store and apple store. From here, we picked the most recurring disadvantages as cons and advantages or positive features as pros.

Next, to find more examples that fit the research criteria, tried to find competitors of the iWealth Asset Allocation Game as the game was given as an example of an asset allocation game. We did this by looking for similar apps in the play store, SimilarWeb, Apple App Store, and comparing the top metrics. This also was not successful, because although we found more popular and better-rated games, tools and apps like the game Rich Portfolios and The Wealth, despite our careful analysis, there was neither information as to their success metrics in the United States particularly, nor any tangibly clear success metrics. This deduction was due to the fact that most reviews for these games were from non-American users and the number of downloads hasn't exceeded 2000.

Furthermore, to establish that the app game or websites provided were the best possible examples we could find, we search articles, press releases, featured stories, and publications. In this search, we looked for tools or software that can be used to simulate/ teach about asset allocation or stock investment. Unfortunately, the information found was related to investment, stock market and money management tools than asset allocation. Hence, we went ahead to present our findings on games, websites, tools, or software demonstrations that can be used to stimulate/teach stock investment because, from our earlier findings, these examples could also be used to learn asset allocation.
Sources
Sources

From Part 01
Quotes
  • "How The Market Works It’s used by nearly half a million investors, financial professionals, and school classes every year. HowTheMarketWorks, just as its name indicates, is ideal for beginners. It offers all the educational materials and tools needed to obtain a firm, basic understanding of how the stock market works."
Quotes
  • "Investopedia Simulator There are more than 700,000 people on the platform executing virtual trades."
  • ""
Quotes
  • "How the Market Works Live customer support for Teachers. Integrated tutorials for teachers and students."
  • "Personal finance labs The Best Stock Game for High Schools! Teachers customize both a stock game for their class and built-in lessons. Real-time trading of U.S. stocks and real-time portfolio updates and class rankings. "
Quotes
  • "Playing through the simulations first will allow you to spend time with your child and open dialogue about the “rules” of investing,’” she says. If you’re looking for an online tool, the SIFMA Foundation offers the Stock Market Game that teachers can use with students in grades 4-12, and works in conjunction with a mobile app."
Quotes
  • "Asset allocation is an investment strategy that aims to balance risk and reward by apportioning a portfolio's assets according to an individual's goals, risk tolerance and investment horizon. In other words, the selection of individual securities is secondary to the way that assets are allocated in stocks, bonds, and cash and equivalents, which will be the principal determinants of your investment results."
Quotes
  • "Asset allocation involves dividing your investments among different assets, such as stocks, bonds, and cash."
Quotes
  • "One of the most well-known investment simulators is the Investopedia Stock Simulator."
Quotes
  • "How the Market Works is advertised as "the web’s most popular free stock market game.""
From Part 02
Quotes
  • ""If market games, which engage students in short-term speculation in individual securities, is the disease, then STAX, which demonstrates the wisdom of long-term passive investing, is the cure," said Bill Bernstein, author of several best-selling books on investing."
  • ""Want a short, powerful lesson on the virtues of sensible, long-term investing? Call up STAX and, depending on the choices you make, you can see in just 20 minutes how things might go terribly wrong over 20 years, but also how they can go wonderfully right," said Jonathan Clements, former WSJ columnist, best-selling author and blogger at Humble Money."
  • "...Tim Ranzetta, co-founder of NGPF. "Condensing 20 years of investing into 20 minutes, STAX helps students discover the value of a simple, long-term strategy rather than being whipsawed by the vagaries of the stock market.""