Anti-Aging Products - Consumer Demographics and Psychographics

Part
01
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Part
01

Psychographics - Men 45-65

Males between the ages of 45 and 65 that use anti-aging skincare products are interested in a holistic approach to health, value convenience and results, and are generally interested in brands found at value retailers. A psychographic profile of interests, values, and brand affinities is presented below.

Interests

  • 34% of American dads are interested in preventing the signs of aging, whereas only 23% of men without children feel the same.
  • Men 45-64 are less interested in skincare. Only 11% of men 45-54 and 5% of men 55-64 are engaged with this industry.
  • Product users are interested in a holistic approach to looking and feeling good, with 80% exercising regularly and 73% actively looking after their appearance. (Note the link to download the report can be found on the right side of the linked citaton. These instructions are provided as the site does not allow direct links)
  • The top skincare issues Boomers and Gen Xers are interested in combating are fine lines and wrinkles.
  • Gen Xers are interested in a social media presence and online communities.
  • These Gen X consumers are interested in healthy living activities.

Values

  • Gen X values the return on investment in a product, placing more weight on results than extravagant claims.
  • Baby boomers value convenience and products that will make life easier.
  • Two-thirds of men value the health benefits of anti-aging facial care products.
  • One-third of men value the confidence and sex appeal that anti-aging facial care products offer.
  • Confidence seekers also value the brand status and how it reflects on their personal image.

Brand Affinities

  • The brand Shiseido is targeting Gen X with its product line Essential Energy.
  • Gen Xers and Baby Boomers prefer to buy their skincare products from value retailers, with 27.9% of Gen Xers and 28.4% of Baby Boomers preferring Walmart.
  • Only 2.1% of Gen X men and 1.7% of Baby Boomer men buy skincare products from specialty retailers like Sephora and Ulta.
  • Product users are more likely to use affordable brands on a regular (weekly) basis. One study found, on a weekly basis, 35% used Nivea, 28% used L'Oreal, and 17% used Clean & Clear or Garnier.
  • Men that value the confidence boost from anti-aging facial care products are more likely to be users of the L'Oreal for Men brand.
  • Men seek brands that have products with recognizable ingredients, with 52% choosing vitamins and 50% choosing aloe vera.

Research Strategy

Market research, industry publications, and company reports were reviewed to find key brands and data points. The specific intersection of male, anti-aging skincare product consumer, and aged 45-65 had limited results. Common themes among these elements were identified to build a custom psychographic profile.
Part
02
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Part
02

Demographics - Men 45-65

Male consumers of anti-aging skin care products between the ages of 45 and 65 are one of the fastest growing sectors of this market. This demographic of men has a relatively high degree of spending power compared to other demographics, and comprises an age range that is showing increased interest in this area of skin care. These consumers tend to be mostly white married men with children, who make more than $60k a year and have a Bachelor's degree or higher.

Overview

  • The demographic of men aged 45-65 includes people born at the end of the Baby Boomer generation (1946-1965) and people born into Generation X (1965-1980)
  • On average, members of Generation X have more spending power than members of any other generation. They comprise only 25% of the US population, but generate 31% of the income
  • The members of this demographic are becoming a more and more dominant portion of the anti-aging market. The natural aging of this demographic, combined with stressful work conditions and increasing awareness and emphasis on physical appearance and beauty (partly due to engagement with social media) are driving factors in the increased use of anti-aging skin care by this cohort.

Demographics

  • Race: The majority of anti-aging skin care consumers in the United States within this demographic are Caucasian
  • Income: Skin care and anti-aging products are purchased by people with disposable income. The majority of consumers of this product in this demographic make at least $60k a year on the lower end of the spectrum, and likelihood of consumerism increases as income increases.
  • Children: A study by Mintel has shown that anti-aging and facial skin care in general is more popular among men with children, especially among fathers on the lower end of this age range. 33% of men with children, and 40% of men with two or more children are interested in anti-aging skin care, while only 23% of men without children expressed the same interest.
  • Marital Status: Increased interest in anti-aging skin care among men with children, and the low prevalence of single father families in the United States indicates that most of these consumers are married.
  • Education: Most of these consumers have at least a college degree, and many have an advanced degree.

Research Strategy:

Specific information on the demographics of male anti-aging skin care consumers can be found on some paywalled sources including Mintel, MarketWatch, and Markets Insider. Specific information for this demographic in this market was not available outside of paywalled sources, and was instead triangulated from a variety of other credible sources which included data on general skin care and anti-aging consumer profiles, and demographic data for men born in the Baby Boomer generation or in Generation X.
For Race of these consumers:
  • Ulta is one of the leading beauty and skin care retailers in the United States, and as they offer a wide range of products and price points, it can be assumed that consumer profiles for Ulta are fairly representative of general consumer profiles in this market.
  • Data on Ulta consumers shows that Caucasians are the largest racial group among Ulta consumers, and data on Generation X shows that most members of Generation X are also Caucasian (66%), so from this we can assume that the average consumer of anti-aging products in this age range is most likely to be white.
For Income of these consumers:
  • Data on Ulta consumers shows that the majority of their customers make at least $60k a year, and that the likelihood of consumerism increases with increasing income
  • Furthermore, data on members of Generation X and the Baby Boomer generation shows that their average household income is $85k and $75k a year, respectively
  • From this we can conclude that a consumer of this demographic makes at least $60k a year, with many probably making more.
For Marital Status and Children:
  • Research from Mintel and reported by Forbes shows higher interest in anti-aging skin care among men with children than those without. While 40% of men with two or more children, and 33% of men with any children were interested in or used anti-aging skin care products, only 23% of men without children expressed the same interest. From this we can assume that the majority of consumers in this demographic are more likely to have children than not.
  • In determining the marital status of these consumers, if it can be assumed that these consumers have children, and since research from the Institute for Family Studies shows that only 27.1% of children are raised by a single parent, with only 16% of those single parents being men, we can conclude that most of the consumers in this demographic are married.
For Education:
  • Consumer data from Ulta shows that most of their consumers have at least a college degree, and that many have an advanced degree
  • Additionally, we have determined that most of these consumers make at least $60k, and data from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics shows that the majority of people making $60k a year or more have at least a Bachelor's Degree.
  • From these two data sources, we can conclude that most of these consumers have a college degree or an additional advanced degree.


Part
03
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Part
03

Psychographics - Men 28-44

The typical anti-aging skin male product consumer between the ages of 28 and 44 is typically interested in: shopping at speciality stores, buying good quality products (manufactured sustainably), and in companies with a strong online presence that offer dad-specific content. A more detailed psychographic profile of interests, values, and brand affinities of this demographic is presented below.

Interests

  • A survey by Prosper Insights & Analytics shows that millennial males in the US are more likely to shop for skincare products at specialty stores (such as Macy’s, Sephora, Bath & Body Works and Ulta) relative to value retailers (such as Costco or Dollar Tree).
  • Moreover, GlobalData's 2016 Q4 Global Consumer Survey reports that 79% of US millennial consumers are more interested in buying beauty/grooming devices that are digitally or smart-phone connected compared to stand-alone products.
  • Almost 40% of millennial men (aged 18 to 35) have previously had a facial or body treatment, according to a SpaFinder Wellness Trend Report, and 39% of those men continue to get one every week.
  • On average, millennial men spend about $2,200 annually on retail products.
  • Euromonitor's survey also shows that American men tend to use about 4.1 beauty products on a daily basis.
  • Finally, the top five skin care concerns (in order) for millennials (ages 25-38) are acne breakouts, dark eye circles, uneven skin tone, large pores and fine line/wrinkles; whereas for Gen X (ages 39-53) they are fine lines/wrinkles, dark eye circles, uneven skin tone, under eye bags, and acne.

Values

  • According to a report by the US Council of Economic Advisers, millennials in US are the most educated generation in the history of the nation. As such millennial men will favor authenticity, social proof, and a friend recommendation over advertising efforts; and the generation as a whole will usually prefer to pay in cash to avoid high-interest credit card debt.
  • Almost 70% of millennial men use some social media, and will often use online resources to make purchase decisions. For example, 67% of millennials in the US note that they trust blogger/user reviews over brand claims.
  • Millennial dads also spend about 28% of their online experience browsing father-related content, and are disappointed by the number of brand-owned content for fathers

Brand Affinities

  • Euromonitor International's Beauty Survey highlights that millennials also selectively choose brands that contribute to a higher purpose and match their own values and ethos. One such company is online retailer Beautycounter, that lobbies and educates its customer directly about the insufficient regulations in the US beauty market.
  • Millennial men are more willing to experiment, and are usually early adopters of new products and technologies from new brands that take advantage of the most popular social media trends and platforms.
  • About 66% of millennial dads prefer good quality beauty products for their families from respected brands over other concerns such as convenience or cost.
  • A study by Saatchi and Saatchi also shows that American fathers (aged 25-40) are resentful of companies that portray fathers as un-engaged. The same research shows that dads would much prefer a message of imperfection over incompetence.
  • Finally, research by McKinsey shows that millennials are looking for brands that offer more personalized products, and will pay a premium if their individuality is recognized.


Part
04
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Part
04

Demographics - Men 28-44

While there is no publicly available information to fully provide details of the demographic profile of a typical male anti-aging skin care product consumer between the ages of 28 and 44, some available data was used to pull together key findings. Below is an outline of the research strategies to better understand why the information requested is publicly unavailable, as well as a deep dive into the findings.

HELPFUL FINDINGS

  • According to Grandview Research, the global anti-aging products market size was valued at $36.2 billion in 2018.
  • The growth of the industry is due to an aging population, where the age group 30-45 years old are the main consumers. This group is increasingly using anti-aging products as they are more anxious with signs of aging.
  • 37% of men in the United States use skincare products in their every day routine, addressing dryness or aging problems.
  • A Mintel study shows 34% of American dads, "Fathers of children under the age of 18", who use personal care products are concerned about preventing signs of aging. The more children they have, the "greater desire to hold onto their youth.''
  • 70% of American men use sun protection or sunscreen, and 64% state the use of facial skincare is in their interest to keep up their young looking appearance.
  • As for product ingredients, American men prefer known ingredients, such as vitamins and aloe vera. They also look for natural ingredients.
  • Forbes reported the same Mintel study, adding that men's skincare products jumped overall sales by 7.2%. It mentioned that brands, such as Dove, Johnson & Johnson's Neutrogena, and L'Oreal, are already tapping into men's skincare.

Research Strategy

Research began by looking through industry related reports in the beauty segment to find any publicly available information regarding the typical demographic profile of male consumers of anti-aging skin care products. However, most relevant reports are locked behind paywall, such as PRNewswire, Marketwatch and Grandview Research. The main source found was the study by Mintel about American fathers and their use of skincare products, including anti-aging. While this provided some helpful insights, the content of the study does not include demographic information of these male consumers, such as race, educational attainment, household income, religion and such.
Then, we looked at different US skincare brands from expensive to mass-marketed types, such as Kiehl’s, L’Oreal, Unilever, Dove, and others, to find reports of the demographics of the male consumers who use their product. It is common for these brands to conduct their own consumer studies as part of their marketing process. However, their website do not contain nor have links to fact sheets or white papers relevant to the topic. In addition, their annual reports do not mentioned their customer data. A possible reason is the study may be confidential or proprietary information.
Lastly, research looked at tech companies using AI and other software in building customer data analysis, such as Numerator, Affinio and Omniconvert. These companies usually provide publicly available details of customer insights for particular company and their products. Their websites were reviewed and we found that they do have some case studies of companies, however, most were not related to anti-aging skin care companies or the industry. However, Numerator provided a comprehensive customer data of Ulta, a US-based beauty chain store. Unfortunately, we could not use this as a direct answer or for triangulation as it lacks some specific information that will embody anti-aging for men ages 28-44 years old. The data does not provide gender, nor is it focused on the age cohort for 28-44, and no specific skin care segment. The report reflects only general customers' data.
Part
05
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Part
05

Psychographics - Women 55+

Women over 55 are less interested in the use of anti-aging skincare products. These women want to get the maximum from the products they buy, dislike the term anti-aging, and have accepted the wrinkles on their face.

Interests

  • Women above 55 are not interested in the use of anti aging skin care products. Only 4% of the women in the United States have used anti aging skin care products.
  • In fact, 35% of American women haven’t used an at-home anti-aging device.
  • According to the Euromonitor, 55% of women over the age of 60 use moisturizers without the anti-aging claims; 63 percent of women above 55 years have accepted the wrinkles on their faces; while only 15 percent want to look younger.
  • Women above55 are less interested in the self-improvement of their skin.
  • 28% of women have reduced the number of skincare products they use.

Values

  • Value is a top priority for US women that use anti-aging products. These women want to get the maximum from the products they buy. They also prefer natural ingredients and probiotics in multifunctional items.
  • 42 percent of people that use anti-aging products prefer products containing clay while 41 percent prefer products containing cider vinegar.
  • The use of the anti-aging skincare products boosts confidence in women.

Brand Affinities

Attitudes

  • In the United States, 62% of women use anti-aging skin care products. In some markets anti-aging products are less overt. Older women do not like the term anti aging. The older women have a negative attitude towards the anti aging skin care products.

Likes

Dislikes

  • Older women do not like using anti-aging skin care products.

Research Strategy

The market research has used sources older than two years to collect the required information, as some of the information was hard to come by. As such, we have substituted it with information that is older in order to give a more complete picture for the psychographic profile.
Part
06
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Part
06

Demographics - Women 55+

The majority of the women over 55 who are the typical anti-aging skincare product consumers belong to the Baby Boomer generation. These are the women with "higher disposable income than their younger counterparts." They want to maintain their youthful appearance through the use of anti-aging products.

OVERVIEW

DEMOGRAPHICS

Race:

  • The majority of women above 55 years of age are white belonging to the Baby Boomers generation who are the typical anti-aging skincare product consumer.

Household income:

  • Anti-aging products are popular among people with disposable income and the Baby Boomers have higher disposable incomes.
  • Women who belong to the Baby Boomer generation are known to be the primary consumers of anti-aging products including "wrinkle-reducing moisturizers and other anti-aging topical treatments."
  • The IBISWorld report revealed that "older women tend to have higher disposable income than their younger counterparts."
  • Therefore, women from the Baby Boomers group "increasingly demand anti-aging products to maintain their youthful appearance."

Marital Status:

  • Women aged 55 and above who use anti-aging skincare products are known to have "more money than their younger counterparts, but they’re also working longer, dating more frequently and remarrying later in life."

Children:

Employment:

  • A majority of people who belong to the Baby Boomer generation are employed and "only 11% of Baby Boomers are planning to stop working entirely when they reach retirement age."
  • It is expected that as Baby Boomers enter their retirement age, they will have more time and money to spend on "recreational activities and consumption" including the purchase of anti-aging products.

RESEARCH STRATEGY

Due to the limited availability of specific information related to the demographic profile of the typical anti-aging skincare product consumer, our research team had gone through various market research reports, industry reports, survey reports, media articles, and others. However, in order to provide a comprehensive report on the demographic profile of the typical anti-aging skincare product consumer who is a woman over the age of 55+, we had to use sources older than two years to collect the required information.
Part
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Part
07

Psychographics - Women 35-54

Psychographics — Women 35-54

Depending on the years one might use to bookend this 35-54-year-old age range, with 1965-1980 being the most common, the demographic studied is comprised essentially of Gen X-ers, with a few Gen Y-ers thrown in at the bottom of the range. These women have completed their educations, they have been working for at least twenty years, and have started families. The lower to middle end of this group will have younger families, while the upper end may already be empty nesters. There is a dearth of information on the specific preferences of women in this age range, and in fact male and female Gen X-ers are usually lumped together demographically and psychographically.

A female Gen X-er is in a particularly demanding time of life as she enters middle age, cares for children, and is often simultaneously caring for aging parents. She is very likely to work full time as well, in an effort to "have it all," which she was taught was the target when she was growing up. Everyone places demands on her time, and she is often chided to "take care of herself," but women in this age range will freely tell you that finding the time to do that is hard. This woman, therefore, craves simplicity, ease of use, reliability, honesty, and she doesn't want her time wasted.

Attitudes

Emotions

  • Gen X women worry a lot. Having grown up in an era in which they were instilled with the belief that they could "have it all," it has been a slow realization that "having it all" is nigh on impossible, and that they are not failures for not having managed to get everything. They worry about menopause, job stability and performing at high levels at work, their own personal insecurities, raising a family, and caring for elderly parents.
  • On the positive side, Gen X-ers are generally happy, and active, and they have worked hard to achieve a successful work-life balance.

Habits

  • Gen X-ers currently spend more money on travel than do Boomers and Millennials. They often travel with children and/or parents.
  • The vast majority (83%) have full or part-time jobs.
  • The majority (61%) also have children at home, and daily life and vacation focus heavily on the family.
  • Gen X-ers tend to research products thoroughly before buying, making extensive use of online reviews, search engines and social media.
  • Gen X has been found to have high brand loyalty, and they are willing to pay a premium for products they trust.

Likes

Dislikes

Research Strategy

We started out by defining who the women are in the 35-54 age range. With very little information readily available on this group of Gen X women (with a few Gen Y women at the bottom end of the range), we focused on information first on Gen X-ers in general, and then drilled down from there through numerous sources to glean some nuggets about women specifically.







Part
08
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Part
08

Demographics - Women 35-54

Women who are in the age range of 35-54 years old belong to the age group of consumers who dominate the anti-aging market. These women are mostly Caucasians with an average annual income of $39,000 to $86,000. They belong to the high-income group, mostly married and have children.

Overview

  • Women who are currently in the age range of 35-54 years old comprise those who are born towards the end of the Millennial generation (1980-1994) and those who are born into Generation X (1965-1979).
  • Generation X includes those who are currently 40-54 years old.
  • A major part of this demographic involves women in Generation X. This generation comprises 82 million people (men and women) in the US alone. Millennials, on the other hand, comprise 95 million of the US population.
  • Consumers in this age group, particularly those who belong to Generation X, dominate the demographic group for the anti-aging market and services and holds more than 50% of the total anti-aging market.

Demographics

  • Race: The majority of Generation X and Millennial women who use anti-aging skincare products are believed to be Caucasians. Genetically, those with melanin-rich skin such as Asian-American or African-American tend to have thicker skins resulting in wrinkles that are less prominent.
  • Household Income: The average earnings of women, with ages 35-38, who work full time for the whole year is around $39,000. While the average income of a household headed by a Generation Xer is $86,000.
  • Marital Status: According to the 2019 US Marketing to Millennials and Generation X Market reports by Mintel, most Millennials who are in their 30s now as well as most Generation Xers are already married.
  • Children: According to a US Marketing report by Mintel, 70% of Generation Xers have children.
  • Socioeconomic Status: Women who are in the high-income group represents the leading segment of anti-aging product consumers as they are those who can afford the products.


Research Strategy

Based on our research, we found that the reports for specific demographics of women 35-54 years old who are typical anti-aging skincare product consumers are behind paywall in industry reports from sources like Mintel and PR Newswire. Information from other articles showing the specifics of this particular demographic is also limited. Hence, to determine the most relevant information for this age group, we initially determined the generational group where 35-54-year-olds belong. As explained in the overview section, most of the women in this age group belong to Generation X (40-54-year-olds), and therefore, we also considered this generation (Gen X) as the main focus of the research. Since it was noted that this particular age group holds more than 50% of the total anti-aging market, it was also assumed that this is a considerable percentage to use the demographic profile of this generation when pertaining to their marital status and whether they have children. After a thorough search, we consolidated all the relevant and common information to provide the demographic profile of women 35-54 years old who are typical anti-aging skincare product consumers and presented them above.

Part
09
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Part
09

Psychographics - Women 28-34

Women between the ages of 28-34 seem to be less concerned with anti-aging products and are instead interested in natural, sustainable skin care products. The trend can also be noted through the year-after-year decrease of sales of anti-aging products and the spike in sales for nature-based skin care products.

Interests

  • Over 42% of women in the age range of 28-34 regularly worry about signs of aging, according to a study conducted of over 2,000 women nationwide.
  • Millennials seem to be proactive skin care consumers who are more interested in preventing skin care issues rather than treating them. This was also affirmed by the decrease in sales for anti-aging products and the increase of sales for skin moisturizers.
  • Women within this age group are also more open to experimenting with surgery and procedures such as Botox, Xeomin, and fillers, with up to 47% who have already tried them, compared to only 28% of women ages 35-39, or 11% of women 40-49.
  • 48% of women are interested and want products containing CBD, with 42% of them also expressing interest in plant-based products.
  • Millennials are more likely to use lip balm, facial wipes, and acne treatments before they purchase any anti-aging product.

Values

  • When it comes to choosing products for skin care, millennials are drawn to, and value natural focused products with recognizable ingredients. Over 57% of them say they are confused by all the different ingredients in these products, while 81% want to keep their routine as simple as possible.
  • Millennials believe skin care products have a direct effect on their health and value a more natural approach to the products they should. Research shows that 59% of women read skincare labels to identify harmful ingredients such as sulfates and parabens.
  • Another important factor for women in this age group is sustainability, this includes products that are eco-friendly, animal cruelty-free, and organic.

Brand Affinities

  • According to a study conducted by Dermstore, women under the age of 35 are twice as likely to purchase a skincare or beauty product if it is recommended by someone famous.
  • When it comes to brand loyalty, it's surprising to find that the majority of women, 85%, are okay with mixing and using brands with others, while only 15% are strictly faithful to one brand.
  • When it comes to choosing a product, millennials are more likely to trust online reviews are YouTube reviews from bloggers they trust.
  • Due to the demand for more natural products, the brand S.W. Basics have seen over a 200% increase in sales. Nuori, another brand that focuses on "fresh" ingredients, has seen high demand and an increase in sales due to what they contribute to be their open transparency that makes it easier to connect to millennials.
Part
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Part
10

Demographics - Women 28-34

After an exhaustive search through credible sources, it appears that information on the demographic profile of the typical anti-aging skin care product consumer is unavailable in the public domain.

Ulta Demographics

  • The typical consumers of Ulta cosmetics are aged 25-34 with an index of 127, following the 209 index for consumers under 25.
  • Hispanics represent the largest demographic for Ulta products.
  • Ulta consumers are earners with indexes of 128 for those earning over $125,000, 115 for those earning between $100,000-$125,000, and 102 for those generating between $80,000-$100,000.
  • Ulta consumers without children have an index of 114, while those with kids have an index of 88.
  • Ulta consumers with an advanced college degree have an index of 114, and individuals with a college degree have an index of 104.

Neutrogena Demographics

  • The typical consumers of Neutrogena cosmetics are aged 25-34 with an index of 107 and under 25 with an index of 131.
  • Asians represent the largest demographic for Neutrogena products.
  • Neutrogena consumers are high earners with indexes of 139 for those earning over $125,000, 112 for those earning between $100,000-$125,000, and 99 for those earning between $80,000-$100,000.
  • Neutrogena consumers without children have an index of 105, while those with kids have an index of 96.
  • Consumers with an advanced degree have an index of 131, and individuals with a college degree have an index of 99.

L'Oreal Demographics

  • The typical consumers of L'Oreal cosmetics are aged 25-34 with an index of 99 and under 25 with an index of 127.
  • Hispanics represent the largest demographic for L'Oreal products.
  • L'Oreal consumers are high earners with indexes of 99 for those earning over $125,000, 97 for those earning between $100,000-$125,000, and 95 for those earning between $80,000-$100,000.
  • Consumers without children have an index of 112, while those with kids have an index of 90.
  • Those with an advanced college degree have an index of 99, while those with a college degree have an index of 100.

Olay Demographics

  • Typical consumers of Olay cosmetics are aged 25-34 with an index of 94 and under 25 with an index of 115.
  • Asians represent the largest demographic for Olay products.
  • Olay consumers are high earners with indexes of 98 for those earning over $125,000, 94 for those earning between $100,000-$125,000, and 95 for those earning between $80,000-$100,000.
  • Those without children have an index of 108, while those with kids have an index of 94.
  • Consumers with an advanced college degree have an index of 98, and those with a college degree have an index of 99.

Other Relevant Insights

  • A poll conducted by Dermstore revealed that 33% of women under 35 years of age routinely utilize anti-aging products.
  • That same poll also indicated that a significant portion of millennials aged 25-35 began administering products for anti-aging by the time they were 26.
  • According to Globe Newswire, North America maintains a 33% market share and serves as the top region regarding the regional division for anti-aging services market.
  • Over 30% of women below 35 frequently utilize anti-aging skin care products.
  • Meanwhile, 42% of women between 25–34 are concerned about physical indications of aging such as lost facial volume, lines, and wrinkles.
  • The index from Numerator Retailer Snapshots refer to the buyer index while defining the type of consumers that buy the product as (% Buyers ÷ % Households)*100. "Like most indices, 100 would be average and the convention is to focus on indices above 120 (higher than average) or below 80 (lower than average)."


Research Strategy:

Data regarding the demographic profile of the typical female anti-aging skin care product consumer between the ages of 28 and 34 is not available in the public domain.

Our research began by scouring through industry reports and consumer surveys from WiseGuyReports, PR Newswire, Deloitte, KPMG, and Pew Research, among others as they are most likely to highlight such information. While we found some reports that contained the required information, they were behind a paywall.

Next, we tried triangulating the information. The idea here was to identify the demographic profile of anti-aging cream used by women in the US and check for the share of women aged 28-34 years old among them to triangulate the requested data. We searched through sources such as NPD Group, Euromonitor, PwC, IBIS, and CPG Data Insights. This strategy also failed to yield any fruitful results as there was no demographic information available nor anti-aging creams related to women, or in general, that highlighted women.

We then tried to use alternate data points to identify the requested data by looking at the demographic profile of users of the best/top anti-aging creams in the US. We scoured through sources such as Mintel, Rodman Media, NewBeauty, Statista, and Numerator Brand Snapshot, among others. Though we were able to locate the demographic profiles for users of brands like Ulta, Neutrogena, L’Oreal, and Olay, the demographics specific to anti-aging products was unavailable.

Finally, we attempted to triangulate the demographic profile of typical anti-aging skin care product consumer who is a woman between the ages of 28 and 34 in North America or globally. The idea here was to identify the demographic profile of anti-aging cream consumers in North America or worldwide and check for the share of the US market or the number of US participants in a survey. We searched through sources such as Globe Newswire, Euromonitor, Pew Research, IBIS. This strategy did not produce useful results as there was no demographic profile available for anti-aging creams.

Due to the lack of available data, we could not provide specific information regarding the demographic profile of the typical anti-aging skin care product consumer who is a woman between the ages of 28 and 34. A probable reason for the absence of information is due to the focus on brands as a whole rather than a specific type of product range. Additionally, concentration on how the consumers perceive anti-aging creams rather than on their demographics also contributes to the lack of data on the requested topic.
Sources
Sources

From Part 02