American Feel Good Moments

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American Feel Good Moments

Americans are competitive and value achievements, affection of family and loved ones, and enjoy moments like a victory in sports, listening to music, being outdoors and reading. Getting a new job, finishing a project, making a delicious dinner, moments of affection with family, friends, and pets are some key moments that make Americans feel good. Continue below for a deep dive into our findings.

KEY MOMENTS THAT MAKE AMERICANS FEEL GOOD

Achievement

  • The Happy Database created after a study conducted by the University of Tokyo, MIT, and Recruit Institute of Technology identifies achievements — big or small like getting a new job, finishing a project, or making a delicious dinner at the top category of happy moments.
  • Americans value achievements and view competition in school, in the workplace, and in sports as a good thing.
  • Many Americans often work hard to keep improving at what they do and tend to compete with themselves.

Affection

  • Affection as a category for happy moments is identified as the second most popular category by the Happy Database created after a study conducted by the University of Tokyo, MIT, and Recruit Institute of Technology.
  • Moments of affection with family, friends, and pets are some key moments that make Americans feel good.
  • According to Pew Research, 69% of Americans reported that they found a great deal of meaning in spending time with family, 47% reported the same for spending time with friends and 45% reported the same for caring for pets.
  • American families only get 37 minutes of quality time together per day.

Enjoy the Moment

  • The third most popular category identified in the Happy Database created after a study conducted by the University of Tokyo, MIT, and Recruit Institute of Technology is enjoying moments or experiences.
  • According to Pew Research, 47% of Americans reported that they find a great deal of meaning in being outdoors, 44% reported the same about Listening to Music and 37% reported the same about Reading.

WHAT STOPPING THEM/PAIN POINT

  • Many people believe that they have to achieve just to feel valuable or worthy, but the feel-good experience is short-lived and therefore, feel more compelled than ever to start work on the next attempt to accomplish or impress.
  • An estimated 60% of Americans describe their average daily life as hectic — 67% of people blame long hours at work, weekends spent doing chores and the school schedule for kids for lack of time to spend with their loved ones.
  • According to a press release by the U.S. Travel Association’s Project Time Off, about 54% of Americans do not take all their vacation days — 34% blame fear to get behind on their work, 34% believe no one else at their company can do the work while they are out, 22% are completely dedicated to work, and 20% feel they can never be disconnected.
  • Another study by GfK Public Affairs and Corporate Communications reported that 37% of people were fearful about returning to meet a mountain of work.

RESEARCH STRATEGY

We began by combing through credible studies and database instituted by the college of higher learning for information regarding key moments that make Americans feel good and what's stopping them from experiencing them more often. We utilize the Happy Database created after a study conducted by the University of Tokyo, MIT, and Recruit Institute of Technology. We filter the top three categories that classify a happy moment for Americans. Our research team went further to scoured through studies conducted by Pew Research Center and USA Hello database to learn about the culture and people of the United States — to corroborate the top 3 feel-good moments identified. To locate some pain point, we studied articles published by NY Post, Market Watch and Psychology today for information regarding what's stopping them from experiencing more happiness often.
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Sources

Quotes
  • "Americans are most likely to mention family when asked what makes life meaningful in the open-ended question, and they are most likely to report that they find “a great deal” of meaning in spending time with family in the closed-ended question."
  • "One-third bring up their career or job, nearly a quarter mention finances or money, and one-in-five cite their religious faith, friendships, or various hobbies and activities. Additional topics that are commonly mentioned include being in good health, living in a nice place, creative activities and learning or education. "