Ad History, Print Paper Space

Part
01
of two
Part
01

Print Paper Ads Part 1

Your research team was able to find ads about printing paper products from the 1900s to the 1970s. It was observed that ads in the 1900s to the 1920s were very simple, having either minimal words or minimal pictures/graphics. Advertisers started to use a lot more words with prominent drawings, paintings, or photographs from the 1930s to the 1950s. By the 1960s through to the 1970s, photographs and graphics became more prominent with the font getting a bit smaller with fewer words used.

Kimberly-Clark Kleerfect Printing Paper

  • Decade: 1930s
  • Description: It is a 1935 ad about Kimberly-Clark's printing paper.
  • How it fits the era: The color of the paper and the printing style it gives is very reminiscent of that era. Also, like many ads during this time, it features a lot of copy that tells a story.

Brightone Velvet Printing Paper

  • Description: It is an ad from 1926 about white paper that doesn't give off the yellowish color that many papers in those days had.
  • How it fits the era: Ads in the 20s started to have more negative space around their copy and they featured more images, as can be seen with this ad's use of pictures of Pontiac cars printed on paper.

Kimberly-Clark Kleerfect Paper

  • Description: It is an ad from 1936 that tells a story about their paper-making process.
  • How it fits the era: The painting of men working in a factory is powerful here as the United States was still recovering from the great depression. Also, unlike the 1920s that increasingly showed busy women, the 1930s prominently featured working men. Just like other ads in the 1930s, this ad featured a lot of copy.

Consolidated Enamel Printing Paper

  • Description: A 1960 ad about enamel printing paper sold by Consolidated.
  • How it fits the era: The picture of the man is black and white. The man in this ad is Phil Silvers who was at the time a CBS TV star. This ad followed the common style of the decade with bold and large pictures with a bold headline.

Hammermill Bond

  • Description: A 1940 ad about the Hammermill Bond paper product. Hammermill is a British paper company.
  • How it fits the era: To boast about its durability, this ad jokes that the paper that is shown is old enough to vote as it lasted for 21 years. The word 'vote' is key here as around this time the world was heavily involved in World War II. It was also an election year when Franklin D. Roosevelt, the president who authorized the US to enter World War II, was elected for a third term due to changes in public perceptions about the war.

Consolidated Enamel Printing Paper

  • Description: A 1956 ad about their enamel printing paper.
  • How it fits the era: Similar to the earlier Consolidated ad with Phil Silvers, this ad features a photo of a woman in an office wearing a headdress that Native American chiefs usually wear. The picture is also in black and white and features a typewriter along with a rotary dial phone, which is aesthetically the most popular variation in the 1950s. The 1950s was the era where they started to feature large imagery at the top with copy pushed to the bottom.

Maxwell Offset

  • Description: A 1950s ad by the Maxwell Paper company talking about how paper helps the account executive at an ad company.
  • How it fits the era: The ad features a Mad Men-style office with what appears to be the "account executive" speaking on one rotary dial phone with the backdrop of what appears to be New York City behind him. There's what appears to be a secretary handing him another phone. This ad also features the large imagery at the top with copy pushed to the bottom.

Crane's Fine Papers

  • Description: A 1947 ad about Crane's Fine Papers.
  • How it fits the era: The ad features a large pencil drawing of a potter taking pride in the ceramics that he is working on and has worked on. In this decade, a lot of emphasis was put on images and slogans, which is what is seen in this ad. Also, drawings were used a lot to advertise because these illustrations were found in a lot of popular fiction literature of back then such as Hardy Boys and Superman. Beside that is a passage speaking on the pride the company takes in making their fine papers.

Old Hampshire Bond

  • Description: A 1909 ad from Hampshire Paper Company about their Bond Letterhead printing paper.
  • How it fits the era: Like many ads around this era, this ad is copy-heavy and has text that tells a story.

Kimberly Clark Zodiac Colors Business Papers

  • Description: 1971 ad for Kimberly Clark's new Zodiac Colors paper line.
  • How it fits the era: This ad featured a kaleidoscope of colors and zodiac symbols that were very popular in the 60s and early 70s. The page with the ad is mostly filled with the colorful graphics and pictures of their merchandise, with two paragraphs up top describing their product.

Research Strategy

Most of the vintage ads that we found were from online stores of vintage products. We verified their authenticity by going through the backgrounds of each store, vendor, and website. One store that was used the most was Period Paper. Period Paper, an online vendor that has been around since 2004 and selling more than 125,000 items, follows grading standards that are influenced by the Overstreet Numerical Equivalency grading system, which is used worldwide in the comic book collectibles industry. We also looked at the ads on marketplaces and compared them with ads we found on more trustworthy sources. For instance, the Consolidated ad we found on Amazon was compared with the ad we found on TIAS, which is one of the oldest online antique shops currently in existence.



Part
02
of two
Part
02

Print Paper Ads Part 2

Your research team found ads about printing paper products from the 1900s to the 1960s. Different printing styles were observed, and some themes were tied to current events and changes in society at the time. These details are discussed below.

Princess Enamel George F. Kenny Printing Paper

  • Description: A 1901 ad for Princess Enamel paper by George F. Printing Paper.
  • How it fits the era: This ad only features a picture of a woman with the brand name and slogan. Just a decade earlier, the slogan was born in print ads. Use of slogans broke from decades of using wordy copy to explain the product and why they should purchase it. Instead, with the rise of slogans and with the emergence of brands, the early 1900s saw simplicity with copy and use of imagery.

Maxwell Bond

  • Description: An ad from 1930 for Maxwell Bond paper.
  • How it fits the era: This ad features a lot of copy wrapped around some small graphics. The 1920s followed this same style of using a lot of copy, and because of the Great Depression, there was not much innovation with ads during this time.

Hoover Company Using Consolidated Enamel Papers

  • Description: A 1949 ad for Consolidated Enamel papers showing a woman with a vacuum.
  • How it fits the era: As this ad shows a woman with a vacuum, this follows the trend of thinking of women as consumers and men as advertisers. Until about 1950 advertising agencies were mostly white men while women were either housewives or receptionists and secretaries. As women were seen as the consumer, this ad simply followed the trend at the time.

Consolidated Specialist in Enamel Printing Paper

  • Description: A 1962 ad by Consolidated Enamel Printig Paper showing a man in a lab.
  • How it fits the era: This ad features large imagery of a man in a lab and copy at the bottom. This style follows the trend that was started in the 50s. Also, using a man in a lab is reminiscent of trends at that time of using technology and science in ads.

Kimberly-Clark Printing Paper

  • Decade: 1930s
  • Description: An ad from the 1930s showing a man in the wild.
  • How it fits the era: The ad shows the image of a lonely man in the wilds. The ad itself is dominated by imagery but the big text that was popular in the 20s and 30s print ads of the 20th century is still present. However, it is important to note the heavy use of imagery in the ad, which will continuously become much more popular in the next few decades than the use of text and big slogans.

American Airlines Using Consolidated Enamel Papers

  • Description: A 1950 ad speaking on how American Airlines benefits from Consolidated Enamel Papers.
  • How it fits the era: This ad also featured a lot of copy with an illustrated man in the woods. Just like other ads during this era, this copy was always written in a storyful style.

"One more bellow" | Consolidated Enamel Printing Papers

  • Description: A 1956 ad from Consolidated showing a woman in a matador outfit.
  • How it fits the era: Just like other ads in the 50s, this ad followed the trend of having large imagery on top with copy at the bottom. This ad shows a woman in a position of strength. Women in the 50s were highly domesticated in the media, showing them as housewives and belonging to the kitchen. However, women started to take up more responsibilities because of the aftermath of World War II. So in a way, this ad went against the grain but followed a trend of seeing more women outside the home.

Hammermill Bond Paper

  • Description: A 1919 ad in a magazine about Hammermill Bond paper.
  • How it fits the era: This ad shows a lot of copy with illustration of people in an office above. This followed the 1910s trend of relying on long body copy and using iconic images.

Hammermill Paper Ad in a Magazine

  • Decade: 1960s
  • Description: A 1966 ad in a vintage magazine.
  • How it fits the era: This ad in a magazine was meant to catch the eye of potential buyers by offering them a free box of paper when one is bought. This follows current trends of using deals and discounts in marketing.

Hammermill Bond Business Paper

  • Description: A 1928 ad about Hammermill Bond business paper.
  • How it fits the era: Ads in the 20s started to have more negative space around their copy and they featured more images, as can be seen with this ad's use of white space surrounding the text which is separated from the image.

Research Strategy

We used merchandise from online stores and vendors of vintage products for vintage ads. All these stores were verified in the previous request and we decided that they could be trusted for this request. For each, we looked at the elements of the ad, looking to see if we could find any theme, and did research to see if there was any current event of change that may have influenced the ad. We also used pre-compiled information about advertising styles in each decade for more context.
Sources
Sources

From Part 01