Accelerator Program Trends, Part 2

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Accelerator Program Trends, Part 2

Key Takeaways

  • According to Saastitute by Recurr, startup accelerator programs are growing, even in less popular startup hubs and developing countries. A cursory glance at the startup accelerator landscape in India will prove this fact. In India, startup accelerator programs emerged in 2018. By 2022, that number has swelled to over 70.
  • Some impactful startup accelerator programs like Google Accelerator, Y-Combinator, and Techstars, among others, have expanded their influence to developing countries over the years. In January 2022, Google selected 20 India-based startups for its 6th startup accelerator program. In May 2022, Kazakhstan became the first Central Asian nation to launch a partnership with the Google Accelerator Program.
  • Since 2012, Y-Combinator has been investing in startups in African countries like Senegal, Kenya, Nigeria, Egypt, South Africa, Ethiopia, and Tanzania. In fact, Y-Combinator's latest batch of startups (W22) features 414 startups from 42 nations. While the US has the most representation, developing countries like India (32 startups) and Nigeria (18 startups) rank second and third in the list of most representations. Even Techstars has been investing in startups in African countries like South Africa and Nigeria since 2016.
  • According to the Global Accelerator Network (GAN), alumni participation and engagement is essential in accelerator programs to establish new trusted networks for change, innovation, and solving community challenges. These accelerator programs should encompass alumni in addition to investors, corporate partners, and startup founders. According to Accelerator Software, 2022 witnessed "the trend of alumni engagement continuing to improve and adding a huge amount of value back into both accelerator programs and startup ecosystems."
  • StartupYard is a Czech Republic-based seed accelerator that provides investments to deep tech startups. StartupYard maintains an extensive alumni network and leverages alumni engagement to help new startups gain a foothold in the market. The alumni are often invited to "share their working knowledge of their industries, and make connections for new startups" that even StartupYard's mentors are unable to achieve. As a result, the alumni have "come to constitute a base of early customers and partners" for the newer startups under the accelerator program.

Introduction

The last few years have witnessed the growth and spread of accelerator programs to less popular startup hubs and developing countries. Also, accelerator programs have started taking alumni engagement more seriously. These two additional trends in the global business (startup) accelerator space are described below.

Additional Trends in the Global Startup Accelerator Space

Accelerator Programs are Growing, Even in Less Popular Startup Hubs and Developing Countries

Accelerator Programs Have Started Taking Alumni Engagement More Seriously

Research Strategy

For providing the requested details regarding two additional trends in the global business (startup) accelerator space, we have leveraged the most reputable sources of information in the public domain, including articles/publications by sources in the startup and accelerator space like Accelerator Software, TechTarget, 1stMOVER, GAN, Saastitute by Recurr, and YourStory. To corroborate the trends and present relevant examples of accelerator programs at the forefront of the trends, we have leveraged third-party business databases like Crunchbase, third-party media articles by The Astana Times, TechCrunch, and Techpoint.Africa, and the websites of UTEC Ventures and StartupYard. We have also consulted a few sources older than the standard Wonder timeline of 24 months to present a robust and comprehensive research brief.

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