By 5:30PM on 2/5/2018, please provide 15 statistics or numerical facts (e.g. years) associated with "Male beauty bloggers and beauty influencers"

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By 5:30PM on 2/5/2018, please provide 15 statistics or numerical facts (e.g. years) associated with "Male beauty bloggers and beauty influencers"

While statistics associated with "male beauty bloggers and beauty influencers" are somewhat limited, my colleagues and I have identified 15 statistics and/or numerical facts pertaining to this market, which primarily arose from a review of consumer research into the beauty sector. Our research produced four categories of findings. First, Millennial men are key influencers as beauty bloggers and influencers, with 69 percent of men in this age group classified as beauty influencers. Second, Generation Z are projected to be influencers in the development of unisex and/or gender-neutral products, with 81 percent of men in this group expressing the belief that gender does not define a person. Third, male beauty bloggers and influencers are impacting beauty products in a major way, with Rimmel London, L'Oreal, and Maybelline recently releasing advertising campaigns featuring male spokesmen, while MAC Cosmetics worked with male beauty influencers to release a unisex makeup line. Finally, there has been a surge in popularity among men as beauty bloggers and influencers across multiple social media formats. Below you will find a discussion of our findings.

Millennial Men Are Key Influencers

1. According to Engagement Labs, men in the Millennial age group (which is considered ages 18 to 34) are key influencers in the beauty market, and are 69 percent more likely than men in any other age group to be classified as beauty influencers.

2. Additionally, Millennial men are 50 percent more likely than women of the same age group to be classified as "conversation catalysts." Conversation catalysts typically boast "large real-world social networks" where they often provide advice on top beauty products and services to their followers.

3. It is estimated that 14 percent of Millennial men are considered "conversation catalysts" in the overall beauty market, compared to only 9 percent of women in the same age group. In fact, Millennial men are nearly as likely as women in this age group to discuss beauty products.

4. Approximately 72 percent of Millennial men believe their looks are important, and 61 percent have verbalized a desire to be unique. It is believed that this desire for individualism is the primary driver of growth in the male beauty industry, as Millennial men are increasingly interested in beauty products that reject gender norms and traditional "masculine" standards.

Impact of younger generations

5. While a substantial amount of marketing research on beauty influencing is devoted to Millennial men, the younger generation is also expected to have a major impact on the industry. Generation Z, the next generation of men, is perhaps more interested in gender-neutral beauty products than any other group. Approximately 81 percent of Generation Z males believe gender does not define an individual. This belief is likely to have a significant impact on the direction the beauty industry takes, as beauty marketers are becoming attentive to the demands of this demographic.

Beauty Brands of Interest to Male Influencers

6. According to Engagement Labs, Millennial male beauty influencers are more likely to discuss beauty products from Nivea and Palmolive than men in other age groups.

7. On Twitter, beauty products of interest to male beauty bloggers and influencers include Pantene, Head & Shoulders, Aveda, and Clearisil, and there was a four percent increase in tweets about these brands in a one-month time frame (from April to May) than had been observed in the previous three months in 2017.

8. Professional athletes are particularly relevant male beauty influencers. For example, Head & Shoulders has recruited professional football players to promote their products, including Jamal Adams, Odell Beckham, Jr., and Troy Polamalu.

9. In 2017, three major makeup lines, including Rimmel London, L'Oreal, and Maybelline released advertising campaigns featuring male spokesmen, while MAC Cosmetics worked with male beauty influencers, the Brant brothers, to release a unisex makeup line.

Surge in Popularity in the Industry

10. It is estimated that 68 percent of beauty influencers in the skin and body care market are men.

11. In 2017, it is estimated that 33 percent of all tweets about beauty were made by men, suggesting men are increasingly becoming influencers in this industry.

12. In addition to the overall popularity of male beauty influencers in the industry, they are having a significant impact on retail sales. It is estimated that 47 percent of males ages 16 to 24 would be more likely to trust the advice of male beauty bloggers than retail store staff in 2017.

13. Approximately 15 percent of all beauty tweets in March 2017 were made by male authors.

14. Viewership rates for YouTube beauty videos suggests that men are becoming an increasingly important demographic. For example, it is believed that 11 percent of all beauty video viewers in 2015 were male, a number that is likely to increase. This is especially significant in consideration of the fact that videos on "men's grooming" are less than three percent of the top 200 YouTube videos on beauty. Clearly, men are expanding their interests beyond "traditional" male beauty products and services.

15. Even in traditionally "feminine" industries, such as makeup, male beauty bloggers and influencers are becoming more prominent. While 82 percent of tweets about makeup brands are posted by women, men authored 18 percent of tweets about makeup in 2017.

Conclusion

In summary, male beauty influencers and bloggers are making a substantial impact in this industry. Specifically, the roles of Millennial males and Generation Z are predicted to be significant for future marketing in this industry, and there has been a surge in popularity of male beauty bloggers and influencers across a variety of social media platforms.
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