35+ Gamer Profiles

Part
01
of sixteen
Part
01

Incidental Players (60+) - Non-Gaming Psychographics

The psychographic profile of a typical Incidental Player gamer over the age of 60 related to their non-gaming habit include mostly watching TV and viewing films/movies as well as preference towards listening to music.

PROFILE OF GAMERS OVER 60 YEARS

  • Gamers over the age of 60 years are largely casual gamers who play occasionally. Usually, they are not very expert players (59.8%) and mostly use computers (1.75) and mobiles (1.31) to play games. They are least likely to purchase physical games, and download, rent, and trade games more often than any other age group.
  • Most gamers of all ages globally find the process of downloading video games frustrating (85%). Gamers over 60 are most displeased by downloads being interjected and needing to be restarted, closely followed by defunct downloads that do not work.
  • Casual single-player games like Candy Crush and Angry birds are the most popular category of video game played in the U.S. They are also the most played game type by players aged over 60.
  • Gamers over 60 years largely prefer to watch traditional sports on television (such as basketball and football) or online and are least interested in watching esports tournaments or online video games such as Twitch or YouTube gaming.
  • Simple gameplay is the top priority for over 60 years. For them, the game should be easy to learn and play. They spend an average of around 30 minutes to an hour at a time playing casually.
  • In the U.S, most of the gamers have missed sleep while playing a game (56.8%) including gamers aged over 60 (48.3%). The latter are largely not employed and never play games during work. They are also not interested in becoming professional video game players.
  • Online security is the highest concern for older gamers in U.S including gamers over 60 years. Hence, a large percentage of this age group will not prefer to play online games or continue visiting a gaming site after a security incident.
  • The gamers over 60 years are largely segmented as "Time fillers"(27%) who have little interest in video game content and esports and prefer mobile games. These casual gamers rarely spend time gaming each week and do not see games as a major part of their lives as they play to pass time. For instance, they like playing a quick Candy crush or clash of clans while waiting for a friend or commuting.
  • The hobbies of time fillers who mostly fall under the age group of over 60+ like watching films/movies, listening to music, and prefer to travel and holidays.
  • Time fillers (mostly aged over 60 years) are more price-sensitive and are most likely to purchase games when they are on sale.

INCIDENTAL/OCCASIONAL PLAYERS IN US (Aged 60+)

  • According to EEDAR, Incidental Players are "non-gamers who play mobile games because they are convenient and provide another way to use their device".
  • The EEDAR report highlights that 26% of U.S population fall under the category of Incidental Players, who play mobile games occasionally.
  • The Limelight Networks online game report observes that in the U.S, 12.8% of gamers only play less than one hour a week. The percentage largely constitutes the age group of people over 60 years who spend the least at 5.63 hours a week playing and are part of the larger Casual gamer category (60.4%) who play occasionally.
  • In the U.S, around 60% of the gamers find the length of time it takes to download games very frustrating.

OLDER POPULATION OVER 60 YEARS IN THE U.S

  • The average hours per day spent in selected leisure and sports activities by the population that falls under the age group of over 60 years in the U.S is majorly on watching TV, followed by socializing and communicating, reading for personal interest, and the least in playing games.
  • The population that falls under the age group of over 60 years in the U.S also like to use computer for leisure, excluding games where they spend around 0.18 to 0.19 hours on an average per day.
  • The population which falls under the age group of over 60 years in the U.S also likes to spend around 0.27 to 0.69 hours of a day reading for personal interest.
  • According to a U.S survey report by Quantcast, the top websites preferred by most Senior Audience falling over the age of 65 years were from news (conservative) category, naming sites such as Conservative101.com and Freedomdaily.com.
  • The most loved brands by ages including over 60 years in America are United Parcel Service (UPS), Home Depot, and United States Postal Services.
  • The aging population over 60 years in America have concerns related to technology adoption due to barriers like device ownership, concerns about privacy with always listening devices, and price of home broadband.
  • In the U.S, older generations including the group of over 60 years prefer to "spend time reading blogs and online articles as a source of information and intrigue, and about 70% enjoy watching videos about products and services." They are also active on Facebook.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

  • According to Newzoo, with 160 million gamers, America is the 2nd largest games market in the world where 9% of the female players and 6% of male players aged 51-65 years fall under the age bracket of active mobile players, that is, who play more than once a month.
  • Older generations over 65 years mostly enjoy casual game characteristics and like puzzle games and stimulation games as they are easy to understand, learn, and play. They are also enjoyable.

PSYCHOGRAPHIC PROFILE (INCIDENTAL GAMER OVER THE AGE 60+)

  • Based on the above findings, it is evident that people who fall in the age group of over 60 years in the U.S are largely Incidental Players/non-gamers/Time fillers, and spend the least time gaming. Further, by synthesizing the insights, which are closely linked to the identified gamer segment of non-gaming/occasional/incidental players/Time fillers (over 60 years) in US, following are the psychographic statistics.

INCIDENTAL PLAYERS NON-GAMING SPECIFIC HABITS & PREFERENCES

INCIDENTAL PLAYERS NON-GAMING SPECIFIC PAIN POINTS

Research Strategy:

  • To obtain the insights on the typical Incidental Player/Occasional/Non-gaming/Time filler gamer over the age of 60 in the U.S related to their non-gaming habit and preferences including insights on their websites, brand preferences along with highlighting their painpoints, I conducted an exhaustive search around multiple credible market research reports focused on U.S gamers and non-gamers segmentation based on age including reports from Newzoo, ESA, Pew Research, and NPD, among others.
  • Through the search, we found that although there were insights provided by reports specifically related to over 60 years population, certain industry reports such as from Quantcast, Morningconsult, and Forbes took a closer demographic of mostly above 55 years (baby boomers) and above 65 years (Senior citizens). Hence, to have a better comprehensive outlook on the response, I accommodated these findings as they shared key insights, which could be corroborated by the findings from earlier sources specific to over 60 years population.
  • Additionally, I examined insights presented by various association and news articles in America sharing relevant insights on the identified segment including AARP, PRP, Forbes, Statista, and Smartinsights, among others.
  • Based on the above findings it was mostly indicated that people who fall in the age group of over 60 years in the U.S are largely Incidental Player/non-gamers/Time fillers and spend the least time gaming. Further, by synthesizing the insights, which are closely linked to the identified gamer segment of non-gaming/occasional/incidental players/time fillers (over 60 years) in the U.S, the details on the psychographic statistics have been listed in key findings.
Part
02
of sixteen
Part
02

Daily Dabbers (60+) - Non-Gaming Psychographics

After an extensive research through news, articles, reports on the industry, among other sources, details about the psychographic profile of typical daily dabbers gamers over the age of 60, do not appear to be available in the public domain. However, the research team was able to gather a baby boomer analysis and a few insights about older gamers, which are provided below.

GAMERS OVER 60

  • Adults over 60 are more likely to use the internet daily to check weather reports, look for news and information about politics, and send or read e-mails, than other generations, as reported by Statista. Other popular uses among this cohort include the use of search engines, online news, buy products, and social media.
  • Facebook is the number one choice, followed by LinkedIn, Pinterest, Twitter, and Instagram. Around 60% of this population read blogs and articles online to get informed, and nearly 70% "enjoy watching videos about products and services." They are also 19% more likely to share content.
  • Among those who play video games, ownership of phones and other mobile devices was 89%, 87% for computers & laptops, 22% for consoles, and 6% for portable video game devices as of 2016.
  • They are more likely to respond positively to data-driven product reviews than opinion-based reviews. Their preferred video content is how-to videos, entertainment roundups and online tutorials. Google reports that 1 in 3 boomers use YouTube to learn about a product or service.
  • Approximately 50% of this population owns a smart TV, and 1 in 7 owns a home assistant, such as Alexa. Virtual reality technology is not as popular, with only 13% using it. Safety is a major concern, with only 19% confident in their safety online.
  • A survey with over 400,000 consumers discovered that the favorite brand among those aged 54 to 72 is UPS, followed by Home Depot, USPS, Lowe’s, FedEx, Amazon, Hershey’s, AAA, Tide, and Cheerios.
  • Television, search engines, and email marketing are the best marketing channels to reach this audience. They use search engines to look for information, purchases, visit companies’ websites, read about products, contact businesses, among other things, more than other tools. They are also more receptive to direct marketing/sales and like to talk to real people, therefore, it is important to have email/phone options when targeting this group.
  • Boomers spend more per online transaction than younger generations but make fewer transactions per year. They are also less prone to shop around for price and prefer to buy from familiar websites. KPMG states that, overall, 52% of boomers did an online search for review and recommendations before buying a product and 45% visited the company website.
  • As for their loyalty, the top attribute to conquer them is an excellent customer support (74%), followed by exclusive offers, loyalty programs, listening to customer feedback, easy to make or repeat purchases, customized promotions, and suggestions based on purchase history.
  • Older gamers are more likely to have a higher income than non-gamers in the over 50 age group, as reported by the AARP survey.
  • This group appreciates cultural outings, gardening, and outdoor activities. Live theater, puzzles, and PC games are also popular.
  • An AARP survey showed that older adults feel misrepresented by the media, as 69% said media images are ageist and 62% would consider switching to a brand they feel represent their age. Among women that number is even higher, with 70% considering the switch.
  • Eighty percent said that marketers portray their lifestyle based on stereotypes and 70% said they would be more likely to buy brands that feature people their age in advertisements.
  • Accessibility is important for this group, given that one-third of people 65 or over have reported a disability.

Research Strategy:

We were unable to find all the requested information about the proposed group. Our first approach was to look for surveys, articles and studies about over 60 gamers who would fit the daily dabber description; we tried to locate the resources in news sites, age-related sites and industry sources. Even after careful examination of sources like AARP, Forbes, Game Industry Biz, among others, all we could find was information about their habits, preferences, and motivations regarding games. None of the publicly available sources provided insights into their non-gaming habits, and even information about related topics, such as technological adoption, was sparse.

Our next effort was to consult industry reports, hoping veterans and experts could provide some commentary about over-60 players. We consulted ESA and AGA, and located some reports about different age cohorts and their gaming preferences, but we found nothing regarding non-gaming psychographic insights.

Since no quantitative data was available, we adopted a more qualitative approach and looked for interviews, forums, and anecdotal information and insights, by locating news articles with interviews and statements from gamers, but again, they mostly focused on habits and motivations regarding the games, with no further relevant information about their lives outside the games. For instance, from these articles, we discovered that some of these seniors are playing as a way to escape reality and give meaning to their lives after retirement, as well as a way to relive childhood dreams. Loneliness is also another important factor, as well as the need for more social interaction, but there was no mention to other ways they address these issues besides gaming.

We also located some interesting communities, such as The National Senior Wii Bowling League, and examined its website and social media, hoping it would provide further insights by association or members profile, but the information was not available. We tried to locate its members’ social profiles, expecting to find some insights, but even the publicly available profiles were not helpful, as the information shared didn’t address the criteria. Next, we disregarded our credibility standard and included some unusual sources in our search, such as Facebook posts, Reddit, gaming forums, etc, but we encountered the same limitations as before, plus the fact that most of the “seniors” on these forums are in the 40-50 age group.
We also considered looking into gaming preferences to draw a profile. For instance, puzzles are one of the most popular genres for people over 60. Puzzles, especially brain puzzles, are in fact more likely to be played by those ages 65 and older, therefore, we assumed we could gather some relevant details for our proposed group by analyzing puzzle players. We scoured through think tanks, such as Verto Analytics and industry sites, like Big Fish, but we found no further non-gaming psychographic insights.

We then expanded the date scope and geographic scope of our research, and approached the request by the generational point of view, searching for information about baby boomer gamers, since this age group is now between 55 and 73 years old. With this approach, we found some sources about baby boomers as gamers, including a 2008 study. At first, we considered the study to be way too old to include, however, after a closer look, we noticed that most of the information found in the 2008 study matches the data provided by AARP, in its 2016 report about older gamers. Although most of the information is still about gaming habits, this report was key to our next strategy.

We theorize that overall Baby Boomer information may be helpful, especially considering how normal it has become for them to be gamers. A significant percentage of baby boomers are gamers (38%), and within this category, 43% of boomer gamers over the age of 60 play daily, as reported by AARP (which would fit the daily dabber); these percentages provide enough grounds to assume that information about baby boomers as a whole could be effectively used for Baby Boomers gamers as well, even more so for those who play familiar and casual games. Furthermore, technological preferences are the same for both groups, in life and for games. Boomer gamers are loyal to series and developers, the same way overall baby boomers are loyal to sites they are familiar with; both groups are increasing their online presence, and are looking for more social connections. They are facing loneliness issues and seeking new meaning to life after retirement. Another interesting correlation is how both groups feel like mainstream media ignores or misrepresents them. Overall, we considered a baby boomer analysis to be the most helpful information we can provide and the best way to reach this segment (apart from a few insights about older gamers available), considering the lack of more relevant publicly available information.

Part
03
of sixteen
Part
03

Transitionals (60+) - Non-Gaming Psychographics

After an exhaustive search through several credible sources, it appears that sufficient information is unavailable in the public domain to develop a psychographic profile of the typical transitional gamer over the age of 60.

RELEVANT INSIGHTS ON TRANSITIONAL GAMERS OVER 60

TRANSITIONAL GAMERS

  • According to EEDAR, transitional gamers are those who switched from HDcentric gaming to flexible mobile gaming.
  • Around 11% of gamers in the United States fall under the transitional gamers category.

GAMERS OVER 60 PSYCHOGRAPHICS

  • Gamers over 60 are largely segmented as time fillers that spend more time on traveling compared to other age groups.
  • These time fillers are least likely to listen to music compared to some other age groups.
  • Their hobbies also include watching movies (around 50%).
  • Gamers over 60/time fillers are interested in simple games such as Candy Crush and Clash of Clans.
  • Baby Boomers are highly interested in card and casino games, for which men prefer to play on PC and women prefer smartphones.
  • Their painpoints include intrusion while downloading, need for restart, and inactive downloads.
  • For gamers over 60, online security incidents are another painpoint and only 8.6% of them frequent a gaming site following a security incident.
  • They are most likely to play games on computers than other devices.
  • They are least likely to purchase physical games as they usually rent, trade and download games over other age groups (Source #2)
  • Gamers over 60 prefer to watch traditional sports on television such as basketball and football or online. They are not interested in viewing esports or online game streaming platforms like YouTube Gaming or Twitch.
  • As per a Baby Boomer gamer survey conducted by the Georgia Institute of Technology in 2008, gamers within this cohort garner their gaming information from forums and advertisements.
  • Gamers that are a Baby Boomers are interested in reading and are attracted to games based on books. They are also very loyal to developers and series.

ADDITIONAL INSIGHTS:

  • Overall, US gamers are interested in meditation (32%) and vegetarianism (17%). The political affiliation breakdown is Democrats (37%), followed by Republicans (33%), and independents (18%).


Research Strategy:

Our research began by scouring through gaming consumer research articles and scientific journals from AARP, Deloitte, NCBI, Limelight, etc. We were able to locate some scattered psychographic information surrounding gamers aged 45 to 60, but there was no data on those who switched from HDcentric gaming to more flexible mobile gaming.

Later, we tried to triangulate an answer by segmenting information from psychographic profile reports of gamers over 60 in surveys and studies focused on Baby Boomers from Limelight, PC Gamer, Penn State University, etc. Most of the information we found concentrated on gamers over the age of 60 and were primarily related to gaming. However, there were very few insights on non-gaming preferences to derive further.

Next, we attempted to triangulate various psychographic insights of transitional gamers over the age of 60 from gamers' social media behavior. We searched through Digital Information World, Angela Cirucci, etc., along with marketing reports published by the American Gaming Association, Nielsen, NPD, and Spectrum Gaming for brand preferences, events, and email marketing. Additionally, we explored ad agency reports from AMP, Clutch, etc., and other news articles from Newsweek, NewZoo, etc. However, most of them were specific to US gamers, and not segmented as transitional gamers over the age of 60.

All the strategies mentioned above failed, even after expanding our scope beyond 24 months.
Part
04
of sixteen
Part
04

Incidental Players (45-60) - Non-Gaming Psychographics

The research was aimed at building a psychographic profile of typical incidental players gamers between the ages of 45 and 60, including data on non-gaming specific habits and preferences.
Below are the useful findings of the request.

Non-Gaming Habits & Preferences of US Gamers

Pain Points/Concerns of US Gamers

Games Played Offline

Other Insights

RESEARCH STRATEGY

Below is the deep dive into the various strategies that the research team deployed in order to locate the information.
The research team first looked through the various research reports, white papers and academic articles on the US gamers and their preferences, from Ericson, NCBI, Deloitte, LimeLight, AARP and others. All these were potential sources that contain various research studies and analysis done around the demographics and psychographics of different segments of users and hence the team decided to leverage this research path prima facie. The idea was to see if any of the research studies had segmented the US gamers by age group and charted out their non-gaming habits and preferences. However, no pertinent information could be located. All the information found was centered around the general habitual differences between gamers and non-gamers, non-gaming habits, statistics around preferred platforms and playing mediums. The team also looked into the offline gaming habits of these players but again only the general profile of offline gamers such as board gamers was found. Hence, this strategy did not materialize.
The second strategy was to search through the websites, blogs and reports of some of the leading US gaming companies such as Activision Blizzard, iQIYI, Tencent Holdings, Zynga etc and platforms like Twitch. Companies do tend to provide details around the demographics and psychographics of their key clients and target audience and hence the idea was to check if any of them had charted out the non-gaming habits and preferences of 45-60 years age group gamers which they leverage to market their products to them. However, no specific information could be located. All the information found again centered around the general preferences of US gamers as a whole. The team found a report from Ericson that entailed the various habits and preferences of AR gamers by age group, but the same did not have any information on non-gaming habits and preferences. Also, no relevant information on the offline gaming habits and preferences could be located in any of the company reports.
The third strategy was to try to triangulate the information. For this, the team tried to segment the non-gaming habits and preferences of 'older' gamers from that of 'young' gamers from the available information as 45-60 years age group tends to fall under the 'older gamers' category. The idea here was to leverage the information around the non-gaming habits and preferences of older gamers to triangulate the psychographic profile of the Incidental Players between the ages of 45 and 60 around their non-gaming habits and preferences. However, again no relevant information could be located. All the data found was again for US gamers as a whole. One of the reports found from LimeLight did segment the information by age group for older vs younger gamers but the same was centered more around the security concerns, preferred gaming devices of various age groups, time spent on playing games by different age groups, preferred place for playing games and frequency of playing games but with no information specifically around their non-gaming preferences. Hence, this strategy did not prove fruitful.
The fourth strategy was to look through surveys around the Demographics and Psychographics of US gamers from Pew Research, Business Insider, Deloitte, media articles from Forbes, Bloomberg, Reuters, WSJ, Live Mint and industry blogs such as 'SproutSocial', 'GameSpot', 'PCGamer' etc among others. All these, especially surveys are a potential sources that contain key psychographic details on the various industry segments and hence idea was to locate any surveys around the non-gaming habits of 45-60 years old US gamers who regularly set aside time to play familiar casual games on PC and/or mobile. However, again no relevant information could be garnered. While the team was able to locate few pertinent surveys on the US gamers, all of them focused on the US gamers in general charting out their preferred social media platforms and branding preferences among other things. The team also found a survey from Quantic around the offline gamers preferences but the same was again for US gamers as a whole and not segmented by age group. It was segmented by the number of players playing the board games and how the habits of solo players vary as compared to other groups. Hence, this strategy did not work out.
Part
05
of sixteen
Part
05

Daily Dabbers (45-60) - Non-Gaming Psychographics

Daily dabbers represent 19% of US gamers. The US gamers are interested in meditation (32%) and the majority of them are vegans. They have a political inclination towards democrats (37%), followed by republicans (33%) and independents (18%).

Non-Gaming Habits & Preferences of US Gamers

  • Daily dabbers represent about 19% of US gamers and are primarily older gamers who regularly set aside time to play familiar casual games on PC and/or mobile.
  • Apart from gaming, US gamers are more likely to consider family a top priority than non-gamers (82% vs 68%) and place high importance on friends (57% vs 35%). Additionally, 67% of gamers feel positive about their aspirations while only 42% of non-gamers feel the same way.
  • 70% of US gamers watch videos online on YouTube, Twitch or a mixture of various mediums. YouTube is the most preferred medium with 69% gamers using the same and 42% of gamers use it to watch gameplays. Twitch was preferred by 9% of US gamers.
  • YouTube's dedicated gaming section boasts nearly 80 million subscribers as of September 2018 and represents some of its most-viewed content. Hence, it is considered to be one of the best and most viable ways to reach gamers in general.
  • Additionally, Twitter is preferred over Facebook or Instagram to reach gamers as it is a prime platform for blasting stream updates and commenting on industry news. It also serves as the perfect place for followers to better understand the advertising message. And, it doesn’t require the upkeep of Facebook or Instagram.
  • Apart from gaming, various non-gaming interests, habits, and preferences of US gamers include watching TV shows or movies (88%), going out to eat/drink (84%), listening to music (83%), browsing the internet (80%), checking or posting on social media (68%), exercising or playing sports (59%), going to the movies, shows or concerts (55%), and reading or listening to audiobooks (47%).
  • Gamers also appear to be more tech-savvy than non-gamers, as they are more likely to use technology through devices such as smartphones, tablets, or streaming devices (like Google Chromecast) while at a friend’s house (42% vs 15%), on vacation (40% vs 18%), at work (20% vs 10%), commuting (19% vs 5%) or at a restaurant (18% vs 6%). Hence, these are the most potential digital platforms to reach them.
  • Overall, US gamers are interested in meditation (32%) and are mostly vegans. They have a political inclination towards democrats (37%), followed by republicans (33%) and independents (18%).

Pain Points/Concerns of US Gamers

  • Handheld mobile devices are a pain point for gamers who prefer AR gaming. Two out of three US gamers (66%) are interested in AR gaming, but one in three (33%) AR gamers reveal holding a mobile device is not good enough for AR gaming.
  • 39% of US gamers find the length of the time it takes to download a game frustrating while 25.5% find it painful when the game does not work or when the download process is interrupted and they need to begin all over again (17.6%)
  • Online security is a key concern and pain point for US gamers and especially older gamers. Around 48% of US gamers averred that they would cease to play online games or make purchases from a gaming website that has previously experienced a security breach or been hacked.
  • Older gamers are most concerned about online security and as per the above-mentioned survey findings, only 12.9% of those aged between 46 and 60 and 8.6% of those aged above 60 will play online games or continue visiting a gaming site after a security incident.

Other Insights

  • Some of the key industries that have catered to gamers with the most number of sponsorships between January 2016 and August 2017 include IT/technology (360 sponsorships), retail (100 sponsorships), online services (60 sponsorships), non-alcoholic drinks (50 sponsorships), and online media (40 sponsorships).

RESEARCH STRATEGY

Despite an extensive search, we were unable to find the requested psychographic statistics for the specific gamer segment (daily dabbers).

All the information found on the public domain catered around the general habits and preferences of US gamers with no specific information segmented by age groups or non-gaming habits in particular. The primary reason for the information to be missing can be its niche nature due to which no research reports or surveys have garnered any insights around the same. The strategies that we deployed in order to locate the information have been presented below.
Our first strategy was to examine various research reports, white papers, and academic articles on the US gamers and their preferences on Ericsson, NCBI, Deloitte, LimeLight, AARP, etc. All these are potential sources that contain various research studies and analysis done around the demographics and psychographics of different segments of users. The idea was to see if any of the research studies have segmented the US gamers by age group and charted out their non-gaming habits and preferences. However, no pertinent information could be located. All the information found centered around the general habitual differences between gamers and non-gamers, non-gaming habits of US gamers in general, and the various US gamer statistics around preferred platforms and playing mediums.
Next, we checked websites, blogs, and reports of some of the leading US gaming companies such as Activision Blizzard, iQIYI, Tencent Holdings, Zynga, etc. and platforms like Twitch. Companies do tend to provide details around the demographics and psychographics of their key clients and target audience. Hence, the idea was to see if any of them have charted out the non-gaming habits and preferences of those aged 45 to 60 which they leverage to market their products to them. However, no specific information could be located.
Subsequently, we decided to triangulate the required information. For this, we tried to segment the non-gaming habits and preferences of 'older' gamers from that of 'young' gamers from the available information since 45-60 years age group tends to fall under the 'older gamers' category. The idea here was to leverage the information around the non-gaming habits and preferences of older gamers to triangulate the psychographic profile of daily dabber gamers between the age of 45 and 60 around their non-gaming habits and preferences. However, no relevant information could be located. All the data found was again about the US gamers as a whole. One of the reports found on LimeLight did segment the information by age groups but the same was centered only around the security concerns, preferred gaming devices of various age groups, time spent on playing games by different age groups, preferred place for playing games, and frequency of playing games.
Finally, we scanned surveys and articles around the demographic and psychographic profile of US gamers on PewResearch, BusinessInsider, Deloitte, Forbes, Bloomberg, Reuters, WSJ, Live Mint, 'SproutSocial', 'GameSpot', 'PCGamer', etc. All these are potential sources that contain key psychographic details on various industry segments. The idea was to locate surveys around the non-gaming habits of 45-60 years old US gamers who regularly set aside time to play familiar casual games on PC and/or mobile. However, again no relevant information could be garnered.
Part
06
of sixteen
Part
06

Easy Accessors (45-60) - Non-Gaming Psychographics

Roughly a third of mobile gamers are aged 45-64. Older gamers are less likely to consider themselves "gamers" than younger gamers. Below, helpful findings have been highlighted, followed by an outline of the approaches taken during research.


HELPFUL FINDINGS


RESEARCH STRATEGY

Due to lack of available information specifically pertaining to gamers aged 45 to 60 who play games on mobile devices due to ease of access, we provided general information on mobile gamers, along with information on gamers aged 45-60 as helpful findings. We attempted to find this information in the following ways:

First, we dived into consumer research sources such as Deloitte and AARP, hoping to find pre-existing reports on gamers aged 45-60 who play games on mobile due to easy access. Even though some scattered psychographic information surrounding gamers aged 45 to 60 was available, there was no information on gamers who specifically play on mobile devices. Instead, available information focused on gamers in general, regardless of the devices they play on.

Next, we attempted to find relevant commentary from experts in the gaming industry, which we could have collected and used to build a psychographic profile. Gaming associations such as the Entertainment Software Association and the American Gaming Association were consulted, but no psychographic insights specifically regarding Generation X mobile gamers, or mobile gamers within the 45-60 age range could be located, although we were able to find information on the average age of mobile gamers this way.

Finally, since search determined most mobile gamers are aged around 55, we searched for information on mobile gamers’ age distribution. The idea behind this strategy was to determine if most mobile gamers are aged 45-60, and if so, to use mobile gamers’ habits in general as a proxy. This strategy wasn’t successful because search determined only a third of mobile gamers are aged 45-60. Because over 60% of mobile gamers are aged 16-44, we were unable to use general mobile gamer psychographic information as a proxy for those aged 45-60.
Part
07
of sixteen
Part
07

Incidental Players (35-45) - Non-Gaming Psychographics

While there is no publicly available information to answer the question fully, we have used available data to pull together key findings, i.e., players aged 35-45 years spend about 4-7 hours on gaming per week; players of this age group are not interested in taking gaming seriously; and the median age of "time-filler" gamers is about 38 years. Below is an outline of our research strategies to better understand why the information requested is publicly unavailable, as well as a deep dive into our findings.

PROFILE OF GAMER SEGMENT: AGE 35-45 YEARS

  • The players aged 36-45 years spend about 4-7 hours per week on gaming; further, about 12.1% of the US population can be considered as incidental/occasional gamers, spending less than 1 hour on gaming.
  • It is found that gamers in the age group of 36-45 years are casual gamers who mostly play games on mobile phones.
  • According to SuperData, consumers aged 35+ prefer to play games on a PC along with tablets and smartphones. Further, the demographic’s favorite gaming genres include board, action, puzzle, and casino games.
  • Casual single-player games like Candy Crush and Angry Birds are the most popular category of games played in the US by people aged 36-45 years.
  • Most gamers in the age group of 36-45 years enjoy watching television and sports like football and basketball. It is noted that players in this age group do not prefer watching other people play games on Twitch or YouTube Gaming.
  • Additionally, it is found that most gamers in the age group of 36-45 years are not interested in taking gaming professionally, and they would not prefer, quitting their jobs to be professional players.
  • Online security is a serious concern among gamers in the age group of 36-45 years.
  • A common pain point among gamers aged 36-45 years is the length of time to download a game.

INCIDENTAL/OCCASIONAL PLAYERS IN US

  • According to EEDAR, incidental players are non-gamers who play mobile games because they are convenient and simple to play. Further, the report states that nearly 26% of the US population falls under this category.
  • According to insights from the NewZoo Gamer Segmentation report, the median age of "time filler" gamers is about 38 years. The segment prefers mobile games over video content and esports.
  • The time fillers segment involves casual gamers who rarely spend time on games and do not consider games to be a part of their lives.
  • It is found that the majority of time fillers live together with family and like watching movies, listening to music, and traveling for holidays.
  • It is noted that only about 12.8% of the US population can be considered as an incidental or occasional gamer, i.e., they spend less than 1-hour per week on playing games.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

  • It is found that most gen x'ers (aged 35-54 years) use websites to gather information and research on the internet using multiple channels like email, mobile apps, and more.
  • Handheld mobile devices are considered as a pain point among gamers. According to a report by Ericsson, about 66% of the US gamers are interested in AR gaming, but nearly 33% find playing AR games on mobile devices to be cumbersome.
  • According to research from the US defense, it is found that gamers are considerably smarter than non-gamers.

RESEARCH STRATEGY

STRATEGY 1
To obtain insights about the psychographic profile of an incidental or occasional gamer (aged 35–45 years), we started our research by examining credible research reports, white papers, and academic articles on the US gamers and their preferences. We researched through notable publications like Pew Research, NCBI, Deloitte, LimeLight, AARP, NPD, among others. We found that most reports featured analysis around specific demographics, relating to their habits, preferences, and dislikes. Alternatively, we found that most information was available for active gamers, and no segmentation was found for non-gamers specific to the age group of 35-45 years, nor any insights related to this specific segment were highlighted.

STRATEGY 2
Next, we tried to find relevant information by researching through credible websites, blogs, and reports from leading gaming companies like Ericsson, Activision Blizzard, iQIYI, Tencent Holdings, Zynga, Twitch, among others. The idea was to locate information related to the user demographics and psychographics. We were able to identify very limited information about some general habits and preferences of gamers.
Additionally, we searched through numerous media publications like Forbes, CNBC, Version Daily, Newsweek, etc. We tried to find any relevant information available for the age group of 35-45 years, but we were only able to fetch generic information about their preferences like watching TV, playing sports, listening to music, among others.

We found report snippets from a paid report by ESA, detailing the insights on the broader audience segment, i.e., aged 35+ years. The report stated some agnostic insights about genre, devices, and platform preferences.

STRATEGY 3
Finally, we tried to triangulate the insights based on the available information. We tried to identify the percent of gamers vs. non-gamers in the age group of 35-45 years in the US. Next, we tried to
correlate the habits and preferences of non-gamers based on all gaming categories.

We searched through reports from Lime Light and BLS to get insights about the age group, but we found that these sources featured insights about the general population and not specific to gaming preferences. Alternatively, we found that about 12.1% of gamers in the concerned age group were occasional players. Also, most of the findings were focused on active players rather than incidental players.

Hence, no relevant information could be located to further triangulate the findings relevant to incidental gamers, non-gaming specific habits, preferences, and pain points.
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Part
08

Easy Accessors (35-45) - Non-Gaming Psychographics

According to, EEDAR, 17% of US gamers fall under the easy accessors who play mobile games. Only 24% of mobile gamers are of 35-45 years age. Below is a detailed overview of the Easy Accessors aged between 35 and 45 in the US.

MOBILE GAMERS/EASY ACCESSORS:

  • According to EEDAR, easy accessors are gamers who exclusively play games on mobiles.
  • As per EEDAR, 17% of US Gamers fall under the easy accessors who play mobile games.
  • Only 24% of mobile gamers are of 35-45 years age.

INSIGHTS ON MOBILE GAMERS:

  • According to Polygon, 34% of mobile gamers solely use mobile devices for gaming. Up to 59% use both mobile devices and PC, while 27% switch between mobile devices, a PC and a console.
  • As per eMarketer report, Millennials (76%) around 38 years prefer watching opt in rewarded ads compared to Interstitial ads.
  • As per Tapjoy study of 69 of US mobile gamers ditch social media and TV in order to retain gaming on their Mobiles.
  • As per Deloitte survey, mobile gamers are highly influenced by TV advertising as around 48% of mobile gamers watch more than 5 hours of TV shows per week, compared to 42% of video game players on whole.
  • Most mobile game players (63%) check the store rating before downloading the game.
  • Around 27% of mobile gamers get information on games from mobile ads.
  • Around 88% of mobile gamers watch ads to get extra lives and in-game content.

INSIGHTS ON GAMERS AGED 35-45:

  • Gamers aged 36-45 spend 7.76 hours per week in playing games.
  • Around 53.6% of gamers aged 36-45 consider themselves as casual gamers, 23.8% consider as experts.
  • Gamers aged 36-45 mostly likely download games (61.9%) and purchase a physical copy (29.7%) rather rent them (4.2%) or trade them (4.2%).
  • Gamers aged 36-45 pain points include length of time for download (34.5%), intrusion while downloading (28.1%) and inactive downloads (13.3%).
  • Gamers aged 36-45 prefer watching traditional sports on television or online such as basketball and football over watching esports or online video games like Twitch and YouTube gaming.
  • Fast performance is the top priority of Gamers aged 36-45 followed by interesting story line and offline mode.

Research Strategy:

What Information is not available and why?

Information on non-gaming Psychographics of Easy Accessors/mobile gamers between the ages of 35 and 45 is not available in public domain and there are very minimal insights on mobile gamers- non gaming Psychographics to derive further.

Strategy 1:

Firstly, we tried looking for information on non-gaming Psychographics of Easy Accessors/mobile gamers between the ages of 35 and 45 in gaming consumer research articles and scientific journals such as AARP, Deloitte, limelight etc and could locate some scattered information which is either mobile gamers or gamers aged 35-45 but not specific to "non-gaming Psychographics" for Easy Accessors/mobile gamers between the ages of 35 and 45

Strategy 2:

Next, we tried to triangulate by segmenting information of exclusive mobile gamers/easy accessors from psychographic profile reports of gamers between the ages of 35 and 45 in gaming surveys and studies such as limelight, pcgamer, psu.edu etc. and most of the information is on gaming psychographics of gamer aged 35 -45 and also could locate that only 24% of mobile gamers are of 35-45 years age. This fact became a roadblock to dive further with this strategy.

Strategy 3:

We tried to search interviews with experts in the gaming industry, in hope of locating statements specifically surrounding gaming habits of mobile game players between the ages of 35 and 45. This commentary would then be collected and used to build a psychographic profile. The main idea behind this approach was that industry experts likely know this information and might have disclosed it in interviews or other public statements. Gaming associations such as the Entertainment Software Association and the American Gaming Association were consulted, as well as credible publications such as Business Insider, but no interviews specifically focused on the habits, priorities and other psychographic characteristics of players between the ages of 35 and 45. Various interviews focused on trends in the gaming industry, or the violence caused by video games among younger individuals, but older gamers, especially those over the age of between the ages of 35 and 45, were rarely mentioned in interviews with industry experts.

Strategy 4:

Finally, we tried to triangulate various Psychographics insights of easy accessors (mobile gamers) gamers between the ages of 35 and 45 from gamers social media behavior articles for social media usage such as digitalinformationworld, angelacirucci, mobilemarketingmagazine etc, marketing reports such as American Gaming Association, Nielsen, NPD, Spectrum Gaming for brands preference, events like conferences, and email marketing, AdWords from ad agencies reports such as AMP, clutch etc and other gaming new articles such as newsweek, newzooetc. But most of them are specific to US gamers not segmented as easy accessors (mobile gamers) gamers between the ages of 35 and 45.


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Part
09

Incidental Players (60+) - Gaming Psychographics

43% of gamers between the ages of 60 and 69 and 10% of gamers aged 70 and above play video games on their regular cell phones when they are bored in general. Psychographic statistics for people above the age of 60 who play mobile games because they are convenient and provide another way to use their device do not appear to be publicly available. We have, however outlined some helpful findings as well as the strategies taken during our research below.

HELPFUL INSIGHTS

GAMERS OVER THE AGE OF 60

  • The following is the distribution of incidental players aged 60 and above among different kinds of mobile devices:
      • 43% of gamers between the ages of 60 and 69 and 10% of gamers aged 70 and above play video games on their regular cell phones when they are bored in general.
      • 34% of gamers between the ages of 60 and 69 and 30% of gamers aged 70 and above play video games on their iPhones when they are bored in general.
      • 29% of gamers between the ages of 60 and 69 and 34% of gamers aged 70 and above play video games on their Android smartphones when they are bored in general.
      • 22% of gamers between the ages of 60 and 69 and 100% of gamers aged 70 and above play video games on other smartphones when they are bored in general.
  • 57% of gamers above age 50 most commonly use phones and other mobile devices to play video games. In addition, individuals between the ages of 55 and 64 take up 12% of all mobile gamers.
  • 43% of gamers aged 60 and above play video games every day as compared to 37% of gamers between the ages of 50 and 59.
  • 65% of women in the U.S. between the ages of 10 and 65 play mobile games (This includes women between ages 60 and 65).
  • The top reason why gamers under the age of 70 play games is to have fun, while for gamers over the age of 70, the top reason is to stay mentally sharp. Moreover, the oldest gamers prefer card and tile games.

PSYCHOGRAPHICS OF PEOPLE OVER THE AGE OF 60

FAVORITE BRANDS AND WEBSITES
  • The following are the top 10 most loved brands by Baby Boomers (ages 55 to 75) in 2019:
    • UPS
    • Home Depot
    • USPS
    • Lowe’s
    • FedEX
    • Amazon
    • Hershey’s
    • AAA
    • Tide
    • Cheerios
  • They appear to enjoy shipping items, with three shipping brands (UPS, the US Postal Service and FedEx) in the top 5.
  • For senior citizens over the age of 70, some of the loved brands include Pond's, Duracell, Samsung, Revlon, Heinz, Oil of Olay, Tide, Neutrogena and Chrysler.
PREFERRED COMMUNICATION
  • Baby Boomers face economic, health and financial challenges. They are worried about outliving their retirement savings as they are expected to live longer than previous generations. This makes them feel pressured to work longer in order to support themselves, which is not a realistic option for all of them because some jobs are physically challenging for them and it is difficult for them to learn new skills.
  • According to a survey done by the Insured Retirement Institute, only 23% of baby boomers believe that they are well-prepared for retirement.
  • In addition to planning for their care as they get older, Baby Boomers also have to care for their elderly parents. This comes at a financial and emotional cost to them.
  • Baby Boomers are also experiencing health issues that get in the way of their retirement plans. A 2016 study of the health of senior Americans found that Baby Boomers "will enter their senior years with higher rates of obesity and diabetes and lower rates of very good or excellent health status". This situation is only made worse by the rising healthcare costs in the U.S.
  • For the Silent Generation (those aged 75 and above) the biggest worry is the financial stability and success of their children and grandchildren in the subsequent generations, who are not as well-off as they are. Many of them assume formal custody of their grandchildren, and even set up college trust funds for them.
  • The Silent Generation also tends to feel underappreciated. By that point in their lives, their social circles have diminished and they suffer from depression and weakening of cognition and memory.

RESEARCH STRATEGY
We were not able to find any specific information on incidental gamers above the age of 60. As helpful findings, general information on gamers and mobile gamers over the age of 60 has been provided, along with psychographic information for people aged over 60 in general.

We started our research by looking through consumer research sites such as AARP, MMA Global and Pulse, among others, hoping to find publicly available reports on incidental gamers above the age of 60. While we were able to find some statistics on gamers aged 60 and above, there was no information on incidental gamers specifically. We used the information such as senior gamer demographics as helpful insights.

Next, we tried looking through reports and interviews on the psychographics of people aged over 60 to in hope of locating statements specifically regarding gamers above the age of 60. We checked sites such as Business Insider, Vox and Forbes, among others. While we were able to locate a lot of psychographic details on individuals over the age of 60 in the U.S., there was none specifically relating to incidental gamers in this age group. We have added some of the insights we found as part of our helpful insights.

Lastly, we tried to identify websites of associations of gamers aged over 60, led by the assumption that these websites are visited predominantly by gamers over the age of 60. Our goal was to examine habits of visitors of these sites using website analytic tools such as SimilarWeb, since these tools usually provide information on websites visited, keywords searched and social media habits of visitors of a particular website, among other things. However, this research strategy proved futile because after a thorough search through the public domain, industry-specific publications and public forums, associations of older gamers in the U.S. could not be found. Existing gamer associations are mostly segmented by region rather than by age group.



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Part
10

Daily Dabbers (60+) - Gaming Psychographics

In the United States, older gamers have a distaste for violence in digital games and prefer intellectually stimulating games.

Habits and Preferences — Older Adult Gamers (The United States)

Habits and Preferences — Adult Gamers (The United States)

  • The most popular game genres among adult gamers are Casual (71%), Action (53%), and Shooter (47%).
  • 68% of adult gamers in the US use YouTube, 22% use GameSpot, and 20% use IGN to watch gaming related content.
  • 31% of adult gamers watch video game trailers, previews, reviews, 18% watch instructional videos, and 11% of adult gamers watch gaming-related shows or webisodes.

Forums for Older Gamers — The United States

RESEARCH STRATEGY

We started the research by searching industry reports and market studies related to the gaming specific habits and preferences of 60+ daily dabbers. We came across a report published by NPD which provides insights about the specific habits and preferences of the overall gaming population in the US. However, information specific to 60+ gamers is behind a paywall. We also came across a few more reports published by the Entertainment Software Association and WePC that provided information on the habits and preferences of overall adult gamers in the U.S. However, did not provide information specific to 60+ daily dabbers.
Further, we also checked scientific research papers around the gaming preference of 60+ daily dabbers. The idea here was to find studies or surveys conducted on the websites and brands which this segment is drawn to, the best ways to reach the gamers and pain points encountered by this demographic segment for both online and offline games. We came across a paper published by NCBI about the older adult gaming population in the US. However, no information could be found specific to 60+ daily dabbers.

Next, we checked various forums to find information posted by older gamers in the US related to their habits and preferences. MOD DB, Steam Community, and Indie DB are some of the sources we looked into. However, we did not find anything substantial. Subsequently, we examined Game Sparks and Sprout Social that only provided information on the overall older gamers in the US.

Following this, we searched media articles and news publications. The idea here was to find commentaries made by industry experts, veterans, and leading gaming company officials around the habits and preferences of 60+ daily dabbers. But, we only located extraneous and redundant data.

One of the probable reasons for the unavailability of information could be that most of the leading research firms have published reports only based on age and not specific to further breakdown such as daily dabbers. It could also be possible that the habits and preferences of individuals in the 60+ daily dabbers segment would vary from person to person.
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Part
11

Easy Acessors (60+) - Gaming Psychographics

Forty-three percent of gamers over the age of 60 are likely to play games every day. Psychographic information specifically surrounding gamers over 60 who use mobile devices due to ease of access does not appear to be available in the public domain. Our findings, as well as approaches taken during the research, have been outlined below.

HELPFUL FINDINGS

RESEARCH STRATEGY

Information specifically pertaining to gamers aged over 60 who play games on mobile devices due to ease of access does not appear to be available in the public domain. As helpful findings, general information pertaining to mobile gamers has been provided, along with information on gamers aged over 60, regardless of the device they play on. We attempted to find this information in the following ways:

First, we dived into consumer research sources such as PricewaterhouseCoopers and AARP, hoping to find pre-existing reports on gamers aged over 60 who play games on mobile devices due to easy access. Even though some scattered psychographic information surrounding gamers aged over 60 was available, no reports on gamers who specifically play on mobile devices and are aged over 60 could be found. Instead, available reports focused on older gamers in general, regardless of the type of device they play on. Reports on mobile gamers segmented mobile players by age, however the reports didn’t go in depth on the characteristics of specific age groups.

Next, we turned to searching interviews with experts in the gaming industry, in hope of locating statements specifically surrounding gaming habits of mobile game players aged over 60. This commentary would then be collected and used to build a psychographic profile. The main idea behind this approach was that industry experts likely know this information and might have disclosed it in interviews or other public statements. Gaming associations such as the Entertainment Software Association and the American Gaming Association were consulted, as well as credible publications such as Business Insider, but no interviews specifically focused on the habits, priorities and other psychographic characteristics of players over the age of 60. Various interviews focused on trends in the gaming industry, or the violent behavior caused by video games among younger individuals, but older gamers, especially those over the age of 60, were rarely mentioned in interviews with industry experts.

As a last resort, we decided to take a creative approach to gather enough information to build the psychographic profile. We decided to identify websites of associations of mobile gamers aged over 60, led by the assumption that these websites are visited predominantly by gamers over the age of 60 who use mobile devices to play. Our ultimate goal here was to examine habits of visitors of these sites using website analytic tools such as SimilarWeb, since these tools usually provide information on websites visited, keywords searched and social media habits of visitors of a particular website, among other things. This strategy wasn’t successful because, even after extensively searching through the public domain, industry-specific publications, as well as public forums, associations of older gamers couldn’t be traced. Existing gamer associations are primarily segmented by region (e.g. Gaming Association of Southwestern Pennsylvania, California Gaming Association), rather than by the age of gamers.
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Part
12

Transitionals (60+) - Gaming Psychographics

Gamers who choose mobile devices over consoles do so because of the affordability and low time consumption of mobile games. Relevant findings have been outlined below, followed by an explanation of why a psychographic profile of transitional gamers over the age of 60 couldn't be built.


HELPFUL FIDNINGS


RESEARCH STRATEGY

The psychographic profile of gamers who have started transitioning from advanced gaming platforms to mobile devices and are aged over 60 couldn't be built. The following approaches were taken in an attempt to obtain the requested information:

Initially, credible industry-specific and consumer research publications were searched, including but not limited to NPD, PwC, Deloitte, AARP and Gamasutra, among others, with the goal of finding pre-compiled reports that provide psychographic information on invested adult gamers who have either started transitioning or have already transitioned from HD gaming devices such as consoles or PC to mobile devices, due to convenience. No relevant reports were located. Search determined the available reports focus on transitioning either from console to PC, or from mobile devices to console, which wasn’t relevant for our research. Reports that were focused on transitions from console/PC to mobile provided information either from game developers’ point of view, or described such transitions for specific game companies (such as Hothead Games’ project to make their games compatible with mobile devices).

Next, as no pre-compiled reports on this topic seem to exist, we turned our attention to interviews with expert gamers or industry experts discussing gamers’ transitions from HD gaming means to mobile devices. Our ultimate goal was to gather as much relevant insights as possible to build a psychographic profile of gamers over the age of 60 who have transitioned or are transitioning from high-quality gaming devices to mobile, due to convenience, but we were stuck after determining the available interviews focus on older people who are just “entering the gaming world”. The interviews described reasons, circumstances and factors that influence older people’s decision to start gaming on mobile devices, rather than experienced gamers who have already played PC or console games in the past.

Lastly, we decided to creatively approach our research. We attempted to identify social media groups or gaming associations specifically intended for those professional gamers aged over 60 that are starting to use or are already using mobile devices due to convenience, after transitioning from HD-devices such as consoles and PC. Here, our ultimate goal was either to examine social media behaviours of group members, or to analyze the association websites using web analytic tools such as SimilarWeb (since these often highlight psychographic information of website visitors such as other websites visited, keywords typed in, or most used social media networks, among other things). This information would then be examined to derive at assumptions surrounding habits of transitional gamers aged over 60. Ultimately, we weren’t able to move forward with the search because we haven’t managed to trace any social media groups or associations specifically intended for individuals older than 60 that are transitioning from advanced gaming platforms to mobile devices. The few “elderly gamers” social media groups that did exist weren’t intended specifically for those individuals that are transitioning from high-quality devices to mobile and there was no way to determine whether the group members are experienced gamers who have started using mobile devices for gaming purposes.
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Part
13

Incidental Players (45-60) - Gaming Psychographics

Among US incidental players between the ages 45 and 60 years old, 14.56% have a creative hobby like drawing, singing, or writing.

GAMING PSYCHOGRAPHICS OF INCIDENTAL PLAYERS 35-45 YEARS OLD

  • About 21.84% of incidental players go out to eat/drink.
  • 21.58% of incidental players listen to music.
  • 5.98% of incidental players watched e-sports activity in 2017.
  • 18.2% of incidental players watch video content online (e.g. on YouTube).
  • About 17.94% of incidental players use YouTube.
  • 14.56% of incidental players have a creative hobby (drawing, singing, writing).
Note: These percentages are calculated in the Research Strategy section.

ADDITIONAL INSIGHTS:

  • 48% of women in the age group of 30 to 49, play video games as compared to 58% of men in the same age group.
  • 56% of gamers are likely to have a creative hobby (drawing, singing, writing).
  • Gamers are 2.4 times more likely to feel bored on social apps than gaming apps, and 60 percent more likely to feel stressed.

Research Strategy:

We were not able to find information on the psychographic profile of the incidental gamers pertaining to websites and brands this segment is drawn to and the pain points they have encountered. We used the strategies discussed below to find this information.

Our first strategy was to look for gaming industry reports in the United States. We looked for information on sites like NPD, Pew Research, and AARP among others. Our aim was to look for research reports on the gaming industry that would have included information like habits, attitudes, lifestyle, etc, of different gamer segments. With this strategy, we were able to find a gamer segmentation report that included some psychographic profiles of gamers. However, the report which had information with different age segmentation is only accessible upon subscription. We thought that this strategy may work as research reports publish various information about a particular industry and may have published this information.

Our second strategy was to search for information on the websites of gaming associations in the United States. We looked for information on sites like American Gaming, Entertainment Software Association, and Michigan Gaming. The idea was to see if there are any survey reports or articles published by these associations on the gaming industry which would have included psychographic information on the players like attitudes, pain points, etc. This strategy may work as sites like publish information on the gaming entertainment industry for education and advocacy. However, this strategy was not fruitful as there were no such publications found.

Our third strategy was to look for media publications or articles on sites like Games Industry and Gamasutra among others. The idea here was to find news articles on the gaming industry that would include commentaries by industry experts or company spokespersons that could be used to devise such information, but, there was no such information found. At most, we only found information about the overall gamers statistics, revenue, types of games played, etc. We thought that this strategy may work as sites like these provide news, analysis, and articles on gaming markets and would have published this information.

As our last resort, we decided to triangulate the information by identifying some data points. For example, if there is information on that XX% of US gamers that like watching TV, then I would have multiplied 26% by XX% to determine an approximation that YY% of incidental gamers like watching TV. We looked for articles and reports and found information on some habits which was used to triangulate the information. However, there were no details found for other psychographics like pain points.

CALCULATIONS
It was stated that about 26% of all US gamers are incidental gamers, we used this data to triangulate other psychographic information, as presented below.

1.) About 84% of the overall US gamers go out to eat/drink. We have assumed that 26% of all gamers who go out to eat/drink are between 45 and 60 years old. Therefore, the percentage of incidental players who go out to eat/drink = 0.26 * 0.84 * 100= 21.84%.

2.) About 83% of the overall US gamers listen to music. We have assumed that 26% of all gamers who listen to music are between 45 and 60 years old. Therefore, the percentage of incidental players who listen to music = 0.26 * 0.83 * 100 = 21.58%.

3.) About 23% of the overall US gamers watched e-sports activity in 2017. We have assumed that 26% of all gamers who watched e-sports activity are actually between 45 and 60 years old. Therefore, the percentage of incidental players who watched e-sports activity in 2017= 0.26 * 0.23 * 100 = 5.98%.

4.) About 70% of the overall US gamers watch video content online. We have assumed that 26% of all gamers who watch video content online are actually between 45 and 60 years old. Therefore, the percentage of incidental players who watch video content online = 0.26 * 0.70 * 100 = 18.2%.

5.) About 69% of the overall US gamers use YouTube. We have assumed that 26% of all gamers who use YouTube is between 45 and 60 years old. Therefore, the percentage of incidental players who use YouTube = 0.26 * 0.69 * 100= 17.94%.

6.) About 56% of gamers are likely to have a creative hobby (e.g. drawing, singing, writing). We have assumed that 26% of all gamers who use have a creative hobby are between 45 and 60 years old. Therefore, the percentage of incidental players who have a creative hobby = 0.26 * 0.56 * 100 = 14.56%.
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Part
14

Incidental Players (35-45) - Gaming Psychographics

Mobile game players feel happier and more relaxed when playing mobile games and prefer to play in front of a TV. A psychographic profile of Incidental Players aged between 35 and 45 couldn't be built. Below, our findings have been highlighted, followed by an outline of the research strategies deployed in an attempt to build a psychographic profile of 35-45 year old Incidental Players.


HELPFUL FINDINGS


RESEARCH STRATEGY

A psychographic profile of Incidental Players couldn't be built. Information on gamers aged 35-45 has been provided as helpful findings, along with information on "occasional" mobile gamers, regardless of their age. In an attempt to build the psychographic profile, we deployed the following strategies:

To kick off, the research team scanned gaming industry publications such as IGN, GameSpot, Games Radar, among others, aiming to find pre-compiled psychographic reports specifically on the topic of “recreational” gamers aged 35 to 45. This search approach was unsuccessful because no reports even briefly focused on this age group of “occasional” players. Instead, available reports described the gender distribution of gamers, as well as the prevalence of “recreational” gamers and the age distribution of gamers in general.

Next, we decided to search for relevant surveys that consult “occasional” gamers aged 35-45, aiming to collect as much data as possible to build a psychographic profile. Consumer research sources such as IPSOS, PwC and Kantar Group were searched, but the available surveys didn’t consult “occasional” gamers specifically. Still, the team was able to obtain survey data on 35-45 year old gamers this way, regardless of the amount of time they play.

For the purposes of this search, “incidental players” are described as those who play mobile games in their spare time. Thus, we decided to identify leading mobile game developers and search their annual reports, websites and public statements, hoping to locate information surrounding habits of 35-45 year-olds who don’t play regularly. Our goal was to locate relevant information directly from the industry leaders, since they likely know this information and might have disclosed it publicly. After identifying and examining numerous leading mobile game companies, including Electronic Arts, Niantic and Miniclip, among others, it was evident none of the companies segmented their user bases by age and/or amount of time spent playing. Instead, general player trends were described, along with age segmentations of the companies’ board members.

As a last resort, the research team attempted to find a correlation between gamers aged 35-45 and “incidental” gamers. Specifically, we attempted to locate an indication that the most players aged 35-45 play games “recreatively”, to use psychographic information pertaining to 35-45 year old gamers in general as a proxy for gamers that are in this age range and play games occasionally. No such indication was found. Instead, we found that the most players who play games in their spare time are aged between 51 and 65.
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Part
15

Easy Accessors (35-45) - Gaming Psychographics

The psychographic profile of the typical easy accessors gamer between the ages of 35 and 45 in US include specific habits to subscribe more often to gaming services and mostly playing video games on a daily or weekly basis and even disrupting their sleep timings.

GAMERS PROFILE (Reference to age 35-45 years)

  • Gamers aged 36-45 years mostly spend 4-7 hours per week playing video games where most are casual gamers who mostly like to play on their mobile phones by downloading the games.
  • These gamers find the length of time it takes to download games as their top issue along with the download process being interrupted and having to start over again.
  • They mostly like to watch traditional sports online and on television along with watching people play video games online such as Twitch and YouTube gaming.
  • Fast performance is the top priority of gamers aged 36-45 years along with a simple game plan which is easy to learn and play.
  • Gamers aged 36-45 years have a habit of missing sleep to play video games along with playing while having meal.

EASY ACCESSOR GAMERS IN US (Aged 35-45 years)

  • According to the EEDAR gamer segmentation report, "17% of the U.S. younger gamers' choice of platform is constrained by access, leading them to play primarily on mobile."
  • The MMA report states that gamers aged 35 to 44 years take up 24% of all mobile gamers which is the second highest percentage of active mobile gamers in U.S. as compared to other age groups.
  • Most of the gamers including those aged 35-44 years are found to be parents with children living in the same household.
  • In the U.S. most of the gamers, including ages 36-45 years spend an average of 7.61 hours per week in gaming wherein most of them are casual gamers and like to play on mobile phones by downloading games on it.
  • Frustration with download speeds is highest in the U.S. including for ages of 36-45 years, where most of the video game players report slow downloads as their top concern.
  • Online security is the top priority of most of the gamers, including for ages of 36-45 years in U.S. wherein they do not prefer to continue playing online games or make purchases on a website that has previously been hacked or experienced a security incident such as a data breach.

POPULATION AGE 35-45 YEARS IN US-MOBILE ACCESS

  • According to Pew research, a vast majority of Americans (96%) now own a cell phone wherein ages 30-49 years adults have easy access to mobile phones, with a 99% mobile phone owner penetration rate amongst which 92% are smart phones.
  • Deloitte reports that Generation X in US has surpassed their mobile video consumption and have increased its consumption of long-form content (TV shows and movies) on mobile phones.
  • The Generation X population in the U.S. largely prefer to watch music videos, listen to music and play video games and explore online before purchasing.
  • Most of the consumers including ages 35-44 years have largely subscribed to gaming services and mostly play video games daily or weekly but report a pain point of seeing too many advertisements.
  • Generation X including population from segment 35-44 years according to ESA, are cost conscious and remembers when playing video games cost a quarter and home game consoles had wood paneling representing 19% of all mobile gamers.
  • "After mobile and tablets, consumers age 35 and over prefer to play on a PC, PayPal and SuperData found. This demographic’s favorite genres board games include action, puzzle and casino."
  • Gamers aged 35-44 years are the second highest consumer based of the popular video game brand Candy Crush.

PSYCHOGRAPHIC PROFILE (Easy Accessors 35-45)

  • Based on the above findings it is mostly indicated that people who fall in the age group of 35-45 years in the U.S. are easy accessors based on their highest mobile phone ownership rates and gaming preferences.
SPECIFIC HABITS & PREFERENCES
  • These easy accessors gamers have a habit of mostly using their phones to play video games along with listening to music and watching online videos.
  • This segment of identified gamers have a habit to subscribe more often to gaming services and mostly playing video games on a daily or weekly basis and even disrupting their sleep timings.
  • These gamers prefer to play single-player games while playing online video games and prefer brands such as Candy Crush which are easy to learn and play.
  • They also have a habit of being cost conscious while playing online video games and prefer to explore options through online search before making any subscription or purchase.

SPECIFIC PAIN POINTS

  • This segment of identified gamers consider online security and slow game download speeds as their primary concerns while playing video games online mostly via their mobile phones.
  • This segment of gamers feel frustrated due to seeing too many advertisements on subscribed games and paid TV.


RESEARCH STRATEGY:

To obtain the insights on the typical easy accessors (35-45 years) in the U.S. we conducted an exhaustive search around multiple credible market research reports focused on U.S. gamers and non-gamers segmentation based on age including reports from newzoo, ESA, Pew research, NPD and others.

Through the search it was found that although there were insights provided by reports specifically related to 35-44 years population, certain industry reports such as from Deloitte, ESA and smartinsights took a closer demographic of mostly 36-52 years age group (Gen X). Hence, to have a better comprehensive outlook on the response, we accommodated these findings as they shared key insights which could be corroborated by the findings from earlier sources specific to 35-44 years population and as the Generation X age bracket largely included the identified demographic population in their findings.

Additionally, we examined insights presented by various associations and news articles in America which shared relevant insights on the identified segment including aarp, prb, Forbes, Statista, smartinsights and others.

Based on the above findings it is mostly indicated that people who fall in the age group of 35-45 years in US are easy accessors based on their highest mobile phone ownership rates and gaming preferences. Further, by synthesizing the insights which are closely linked to the identified gamer segment of easy accessors (35-45) in the U.S., the details on the psychographic statistics have been presented in detail in the key findings section.
Part
16
of sixteen
Part
16

Daily Dabbers (45-60) - Demographics

About 13.68% of gamers who are without high school degrees and play board games are likely to between ages 45-60 years old. In addition, the average gamer is male.

DAILY DABBERS (45-60) DEMOGRAPHICS:

  • Women (38%) aged 50 or older are more likely to play video games than men (29%) of the same age.
  • Almost 60% of gamers over 50 years old use computers, laptops and phones to play video games.
  • Up to 57% of gamers over 50 years old play games online.

ADDITIONAL INSIGHTS:

  • About 96% of gamers in the US use mobiles and their personal computers to play games, followed by consoles (81%), handheld(24%), and VR/other (12%).

Research Strategy:

We kicked off this research by looking for gaming industry reports that discussed the income, location, and general demographic data on gamers aged 45 to 60 who can be considered "daily dabbers" in the United States. We examined websites like NPD and Deloitte among others. While we found a gamer segmentation report that included demographics for various segments, the report was obstructed by a paywall. Next, we turned to gaming associations websites such as American Gaming, Entertainment Software Association, and Michigan Gaming. We hoped there'd be surveys or articles published by these associations on the gaming industry, which would have included information on the demographics of these players. However, this strategy was not fruitful as no such publications were found on these websites. We then scoured media publications and articles on sites like GamesIndustry, Gamasutra, and Techjury. The idea here was to find news articles on the gaming industry that would include commentaries made by industry experts and company spokespersons that could then be used to devise the requested information, but, there was no such information found. We only found general statistics and trends related to the gaming industry. As a last resort, we decided to triangulate the information by identifying some data points. Despite perusing the above-mentioned resources, we were still unable to triangulate the demographics of these gamers. Our calculations have been outlined below.

CALCULATIONS:

#1. Education
  • About 72% of people without high school degrees play board games. In addition, around 19% of all US gamers are between ages 45 to 60 years old.
  • Thus, the number of gamers without high school degrees who play board games= (19% × 72%)/100= 13.68%
  • Therefore, 13.68% of all gamers who are without high school degrees and play board games are likely to be between 45-60 years old

#2. Income:

  • Consumers with a household income of $100,000 or more make up 17% of mobile gamers, with another 37% earning between $50,000 and $99,000. In addition, around 19% of all US gamers are between ages 45 to 60 years old.
  • Therefore, the number of gamers between ages 45-65 years with a household income of $100,000 or more = (17% × 19%)/100= 3.23%
  • The number of gamers between 45-65 years who earn $50,000 and $99,000= (37% × 19%)/100= 7.03%
  • Therefore, 3.23% of all gamers between ages 45-65 have a household income of $100,000 or more as compared to 7.03% earning between $50,000 and $99,000.

Sources
Sources

From Part 02
From Part 03
Quotes
  • "Invested adult gamers whose stage of life means shifting from HDcentric gaming to more flexible mobile gaming."
Quotes
  • " 8.6 percent over 60 will play online games or continue visiting a gaming site after a security incident."
  • "Those over 60 use computers more than any other device. "
  • "Gamers over 60 are the least likely to purchase physical games, and they download, rent, and trade games more often than any other age group"
  • "Download speeds are the primary frustration for gamers 60 and under. Gamers over 60 are most annoyed by downloads being interrupted and needing to be restarted, closely followed by downloads that do not work."
  • "For those over 60, simple gameplay was most important."
  • "Less than 17 percent of gamers over 60 who are employed play at work."
Quotes
  • "most Time Fillers are between 51-65 years old, and fewer Time Fillers live with children than Conventional Players. Conventional Players listen to slightly less music than the average gamer persona, and the Time Filler travels slightly more than the average gamer persona."
Quotes
  • " Boomers (55-64) mostly prefer card and casino games, with men playing on PC and women playing on their smartphones. While expressing a high preference for casual games, a quarter of Boomer gamers report a long history of gaming, stretching back at least 25 years. Gamers are gamers for life."
Quotes
  • "Baby Boomer Gamers spend more times playing games than they do watching television and are more likely to displace television-watching with gaming than any other activity"
  • "Baby Boomer Gamers get their game information from forums; ads have little influence"
  • "Baby Boomers are loyal to series’ and developers."
  • "Baby Boomers like to read, enjoy games that are based on books, and compared the slower pace of adventure games to reading."
From Part 06
Quotes
  • "Further, mobile-dominant gamers exhibit the second-highest gaming intensity (figure 3) with 59 percent playing at least weekly—above the 57 percent average across all gamers, but below the 61 percent of gamers who prefer consoles.6"
  • "In terms of how these consumers interact with advertising, they may be most influenced by television commercials and product placement in TV shows. This makes sense considering that 48 percent of mobile-dominant gamers watch more than five hours per week of TV shows, compared to 42 percent for video game players overall.8"
  • "In relation to other forms of media and entertainment, 54 percent of these gamers stream video at least once a week, while more than one-half view live broadcast TV.10"
  • "Among mobile-dominant game players, the ratio of consumers who say they are inundated by too much advertising (“ad-lergic”) to those who say they are frustrated by having to manage multiple subscriptions (“subscription fatigue”) is higher than it is for console-dominant gamers (see figure 5)."
  • "Compared to mobile-dominant players, console gamers may be more frustrated by having to manage multiple streaming services than they are by advertising disruptions. In terms of reaching and influencing these gamers, video-game advertising, unsurprisingly, likely has the greatest impact."
Quotes
  • "Older generations are much less likely to call themselves a “gamer.” Thirty-three percent of adults aged 55 and over play mobile games daily and yet 85 percent shy away from the title “gamer.” Meanwhile, half of Gen Z (53 percent) would consider themselves “gamers.”"
Quotes
  • "55% of mobile gamers are around 55 years old, while 21% are between 25 and 34 years old."
From Part 08
Quotes
  • "Represent about 17% of US Gamers - Younger gamers whose choice of platform is constrained by access, leading them to play primarily on mobile."
Quotes
  • "Only 25.2 percent of those 36 or older do not watch broadcast sports."
Quotes
  • "34 percent use only mobile devices 59 percent use a mobile device as well as a PC or console 27 percent use a mobile device, a PC and a console"
Quotes
  • "According to a Tapjoy study of 18,442 US adults, 87 per cent of consumers have been playing mobile games for more than two years, with 69 per cent happy to ditch social media and TV in order to keep gaming on their smartphones."
Quotes
  • "Top types of games played include card, puzzle, word, and casino 93% selected “home” as the location they typically play mobile games 88% prefer to watch video ads for extra lives and/or in-game content"
  • "27% look at mobile ads for mobile games to download "
From Part 10
Quotes
  • "Contrary to common misconception, they’re also generally healthy, civically engaged, college-educated, and socially active."
  • "More than three-quarters of gamers surveyed report that video games provide them with mental stimulation (79%) as well as relaxation and stress relief (78%). "
  • "The role of video games in the American family is also changing: nearly three-quarters (74%) of parents believe video games can be educational for their children, and more than half (57%) enjoy playing games with their child at least weekly."
Quotes
  • "68% of adult gamers in the U.S. said that they use YouTube to watch gaming related content."
  • "22% of the U.S. adult gamers said they use GameSpot to watch gaming related content."
  • "20% of the adult gamers in the United States use IGN to watch content related to gaming."
  • "31% of adult gamers watch video game trailers/previews/reviews"
  • "18% of adult gamers watch instructional videos"
  • "11% of adult gamers and 21% of teen gamers in the U.S. watch gaming-related shows/webisodes"
Quotes
  • "An important finding is the prevalent distaste for violence in digital games among older adults."
  • "In addition to an aversion to violence, 80% of surveyed baby boomers preferred intellectually stimulating gameplay over games that are speed and reflex-oriented"
  • "Gender differences in game preference have also been observed, as older female gamers were found to prefer cartoonish graphics while male gamers were more partial toward realism"
Quotes
  • "Younger gamers prefer competition while older gamers’ interest in it tapers off at around 40."
  • "In general, however, many older gamers tend to decrease the time spent on games due to increased responsibilities and other hobbies. Many, however, continue to play games in some form or another."
  • "Casual games might be great for this crowd, but they often want the challenge that older games from their youth offered."
Quotes
  • "As a senior gamer, Buchanan has plenty of company. She is one of a growing number of Americans over 50 who are playing video games as a way to remain socially connected and cognitively sharp in a world that continues to expand into the digital realm."
  • "Half of the respondents in the 2016 study who said they play online games said they play more online games now — on a range of platforms, including mobile, console and computer — than they did five years ago."
  • "Several gamers over 50 told NBC News that video games offered the social benefit of interacting with other players and even the chance to build followings on platforms like YouTube and Twitch."
Quotes
  • "That gender split largely disappears in older gamers, with men and women Gen Xers preferring mobile games."
  • "Boomers (55-64) mostly prefer card and casino games, with men playing on PC and women playing on their smartphones."
  • "While expressing a high preference for casual games, a quarter of Boomer gamers report a long history of gaming, stretching back at least 25 years. Gamers are gamers for life."
From Part 11
Quotes
  • "Three-quarters of gamers play video games weekly, with four in ten gamers saying they play video games every day. Interestingly, a greater proportion of older gamers compared to younger gamers report playing video games weekly or more often (37% of 50-59 year olds compared to 43% of 60-plus say they play every day). "
From Part 12
Quotes
  • "Three-quarters of gamers play video games weekly, with four in ten gamers saying they play video games every day. Interestingly, a greater proportion of older gamers compared to younger gamers report playing video games weekly or more often (37% of 50-59 year olds compared to 43% of 60-plus say they play every day)"
From Part 14
Quotes
  • "One of the main findings from the report, titled “The Changing Face of Mobile Gamers: What Brands Need to Know,” shows that consumers are twice as likely to say they feel relaxed when playing mobile games than they are when using social apps. They also say they feel more focused (35% vs 11%), happier (34% vs 21%), and more engaged (35% vs 20%) on gaming apps than social networking apps. Conversely, consumers are 2.4 times more likely to feel bored on social apps than gaming apps, and 60 percent more likely to feel stressed."
  • "What mobile gamers play: Puzzle games are by far the most popular category, played by 59% of respondents. Strategy (38%), Trivia (33%) and Casino/Card (27%) games were next on the list, respectively. Among the least popular games are Player-vs-Player (15%), Sports (11%) and Shooting (8%). "
  • "When mobile gamers play: 70 percent of mobile gamers say they play while sitting in front of the television, and they are more than twice as likely to play while relaxing at home than while at work or during their commute. They are also more than twice as likely to play at night right before they go to bed than when they first wake up in the morning. "
  • "How mobile gamers view themselves: More than two-thirds of consumers who play games do not identify themselves as a gamer. Even among those who said that they play mobile games six times per week or more, less than one in three identify as a gamer."