35+ Gamer Profiles

Part
01
of 40
Part
01

Incidental Players (60+) - Non-Gaming Psychographics

To build a psychographic profile for the average Incidental Player over the age of 60, this data follows the basic demographic profile which was built in earlier research. This typical Incidental Player over the age of 60 is either female or male and prefers to play on his/her smartphone. They are most likely college-educated, married, and have children. Females are more likely to make an in-game purchase than their male counterpart.

ONLINE HABITS

  • Gamers as a whole, and as an extension Incidental Player (which are likely college-educated with a higher than average income), are between 1.1 times and 1.5 times more likely to make purchases in the following categories than the general online population: entertainment, electronics, computers, smartphones, and cars.
  • 74% of gamers state that "they would pay more for top-quality media and entertainment products and services" and 85% indicate their willingness to "pay more for top quality consumer electronics products and services".
  •  73% are willing to pay more for top-quality food and beverage products and services.

NON-GAMING WEBSITES

Data on this segment's Facebook page preferences (listed by category and page name) has been collected from the Facebook subscribers who fit the Incidental Players demographic profile — men and women over the age of 60, with interest in games (browser, board, card, casino, and online), college-educated, and married:
  • Sports — SilverSneakers
  • Interest — Poll Hype, The Grandma's Club, AWM America, USA Patriots for Donald Trump
  • Media/news company — Donald Trump is My President, Jefferson Newsletter by WJ, and Conservative Reporter
  • Politician — Governor Jan Brewer, Rick Perry, and Joe Walsh
  • Community organization — Fed-Up Americans
  • Loan service — Low VA Rates
  • Community — Conservatives Today, FutureinAmerica, Liberty Upheld, TruthFeed, and Stop Amnesty
  • Cause — The Committee to Defend the President, StandUnited.org, and Veterans Advantage
  • News Personality — Ben Ferguson, and Young Conservatives
  • Political organization — OpsLens, NRSC, Heritage Action for America, and Fight Trump
  • Newspaper — Patriots United
  • Media — Defense Of Freedom, All That's Entertainment, US Chronicle, WD Americans Online, and ND Life
  • News and media website — Your Nation, Headline Politics, LifeZette, Twitchy, Townhall.com, Master
  • Public figure — Matt Kibbe, Marlo Thomas, Jay Sekulow, Laura W. Bush, and Greta Van Susteren
  • Website — The Good Old Days
  • Personal blog — Yes I'm Right
  • History Museum — Old Photo Archive
  • Hospital — Cleveland Clinic
  • Non-profit organization — No Labels, National Pro-Life Alliance, Alliance Defending Freedom, ACLJHuman Coalition, and FAIRFWD.us
  • Financial consultant — Conservative Post
  • Fan Page — We Love President Donald J. Trump
 Analysis of these page likes provides the following assumptions of the general non-gaming preferences of the Incidental Players over 60:
  • They are patriotic.
  • They are more conservative in their political beliefs and follow political leaders.

NON-GAMING BRANDS

Data on this segment's Facebook brand page preferences (listed by category and brand name) has been collected from the Facebook subscribers who fit the Incidental Players demographic profile — men and women over the age of 60, with interest in games (browser, board, card, casino, and online), college-educated, and married:
  • Travel company — Viking
  • Clothing (brand) — Chico's
Analysis of these brand likes provides the following assumptions of the general non-gaming brand preferences of the Incidental Player over the age of 60:
  • Do not use social media to follow brands they like, they are more likely to follow political and news pages.

WAYS TO REACH

As the majority of this segment lies within the Baby Boomer generation, the following statistics apply to Incidental Players in terms of marketing engagement:
  • 82.3% of Baby Boomers have a Facebook account. 35.3% have a LinkedIn account, and 34.4% use Pinterest.
  • 96% of Baby Boomers use search engines, 95% use email, and 92% shop online.
  • 70% of this generation enjoy watching videos about products and services.
  • 78% of Baby Boomers continue with a program or service is it is simple.

PAIN POINTS

As the majority of this segment lies within the Baby Boomer generation, the following statistics apply to Incidental Players in terms of pain points:
  • 8 out of 10 Baby Boomers feel that advertisements are targeting younger consumers.
Adults over the age of 50 spend an average of over $7 billion on line per year, so it is safe to assume that the average Incidental Player over the age of 60 is a very active online consumer. Following are several common pain points experienced by online shoppers:
  • A common problem is "too many choices without any choosing support is a source of great consumer frustration". A potential solution is to have a "passionate and knowledgeable expert who helps them discover products they’ll love and offers them ways to easily and intuitively pick the product that’s right for THEM".
  •  50% of potential sales are lost because visitors to a website or online shopping cart can’t find what they are looking for.
  • "45% of US customers are likely to abandon an online purchase if they can’t find a quick answer to their question".
Additional insights:
  • The over 60 demographic, although tech knowledgeable are not as tech savy as the younger generations. Easy to navigate websites and registration pages can help keep this group engaged.

RESEARCH STRATEGY

To build this profile, data was collated from sources like the EEDAR Gamer Segmentation Report, the Facebook Insights Tool, research from Facebook Gaming marketing reports, and additional highlights from media and market research findings. Please note that when using the Facebook Insights tool to provide the presented psychographic data, the following segments were chosen based upon assumptions from the corresponding demographic profile: over the age of 60 and interest choices of board games, browser games, card games, casino games, and online games. Some data points apply to multiple segments of the profiles within this project.

Part
02
of 40
Part
02

Daily Dabblers (60+) - Non-Gaming Psychographics

To build a psychographic profile which details the non-gaming habits and preferences for the average Daily Dabbler, this data follows the basic demographic profile which was built in earlier research. This typical Daily Dabbler gamer over the age of 60 is a mobile games player. As such, they share many traits in common with other gamers in their age bracket and likely still game their mobile device.

Online Habits

  • Gamers as a whole, and as an extension Daily Dabbler, are between 1.1 times and 1.5 times more likely to make purchases in the following categories than the general online population: entertainment, electronics, computers, smartphones, and cars.
  • 74% of gamers state that "they would pay more for top-quality media and entertainment products and services" and 85% indicate their willingness to "pay more for top quality consumer electronics products and services".
  • 73% are willing to pay more for top-quality food and beverage products and services.

Non-Gaming Websites

Data on this segment's Facebook page preferences (listed by category and page name) has been collected from the Facebook subscribers who fit the Daily Dabbler demographic profile — men and women over the age of 60, with interest in games (browser, board, card, casino, and online), college-educated, and married:
    • Politicians —Governor Jan Brewer, Joe Walsh, Joe Kennedy III, Rick Perry
    • Political organization — Fight Trump, Anti-Trump Army, OpsLens, Impeach Trump, Opposition Report
    • News Personality — Greta Van Susteren
    • Public figure — Marlo Thomas, Jay Sekulow
    • TV Network — Inspiration
    • Collectibles shop — The Bradford Exchange
    • Loan Service- Low VA Rates
    • Community Organization- AARP
    • News and media website — Patriots Unlimited
    • Breakfast & Brunch Restaurant — Cracker Barrel Old Country Store
    • Travel Agent — Bookvip.com
    • Non-profit organization — No Labels, FWD.us, ACLJ, Alliance Defending Freedom, FAIR
    • Community — Proud Progressive, Conservatives Today, Liberty Upheld, FutureinAmerica
    • Hospital- Cleveland Clinic
    • Website- The Good Old Days
    • Media company —Defense Of Freedom, Expose Trump, All That's Entertainment, US Chronicle
    • News- Greenville Gazette, Washington Press, Conservative Reporter, Conservative Tradition
    • Financial- Conservative Post
    • Travel Company- Viking
    • Fitness- 17% use wearables to track their steps. 48% are willing to do so.

    NON-GAMING BRANDS

    Data on this segment's Facebook brand page preferences (listed by category and brand name) has been collected from the Facebook subscribers who fit the Daily Dabbler demographic profile — men and women over 60, with interest in games (browser, board, card, casino, and online), college-educated, and married:
    • Sports- Silver Sneakers
    • Clothing Brand- Chico's
    • Beauty-Pond's, Oil of Olay, Neutrogena
    • Household- Tide, Heinz, Duracell, Samsung, Oil of
     Analysis of these page likes provides the following assumptions of the general non-gaming preferences of the Daily Dabbler between over the age of 60:
    • They are grandparents.
    • They are reminiscent of their past.
    • The group has a classic taste in music and are likely traditional in their views on politics and social issues.
    • This age group appreciates dependability and products that have withstood the test of time.

    Pain Points

    • They dislike pop-up ads and with growing technology ability, will install a blocker.
    • They have modified their behavior to skip sponsored results in searches.
    • They will remove a game from their phone if they feel it is a waste of time.
    • They do no like to have their personal data collected.
    • Small fonts and targets make usability poor for this age group.
    • Inflexible websites that only accept input in a specific format is a pain point.

    Research Strategy

    To build this profile, data was collated from sources like the EEDAR Gamer Segmentation Report, the Facebook Insights Tool, research from Facebook Gaming marketing reports, and additional highlights from media and market research findings. Please note that when using the Facebook Insights tool to provide the presented psychographic data, the following segments were chosen based upon assumptions from the corresponding demographic profile: Over 60 and interest choices of board games, browser games, card games, casino games, and online games. Some data points apply to multiple segments of the profiles within this project.

Part
03
of 40
Part
03

Easy Accessors (60+) - Non-Gaming Psychographics

To build a psychographic profile which details the non-gaming habits and preferences for the average Early Accessors, this data follows the basic demographic profile which was built in earlier research. This typical Early Accessor gamer over the age of 60 is female and prefers to play casual games. She is most likely college-educated, married, and has children. Overall, 59% of all people in this age group play regardless of gender and game.

ONLINE HABITS

  • Gamers as a whole, and as an extension Easy Accessors (which are likely college-educated with a higher than average income), are between 1.1 times and 1.5 times more likely to make purchases in the following categories than the general online population: entertainment, electronics, computers, smartphones, and cars.
  •  74% of gamers state that "they would pay more for top-quality media and entertainment products and services" and 85% indicate their willingness to "pay more for top quality consumer electronics products and services".
  • 82% of gamers are considering family a top priority (compared to 68% of the non-gaming population), feel more positive about their aspirations (67% compared to 42% of the non-gaming population), and want to positively impact society (61% compared to 35% of the non-gaming population).

NON-GAMING WEBSITES

Data on this segment's Facebook page preferences (listed by category and page name) has been collected from the Facebook subscribers who fit the Easy Accessors demographic profile — men and women over the age of 60, with interest in games (browser, board, card, casino, and online), college-educated, and married:
  • Sports — SilverSneakers
  • Loan service — Low VA Rates
  • Political organization — Fight Trump, Anti-Trump Army, OpsLens
  • Cause — The Committee to Defend the President, StandUnited.org
  • Travel company — Viking
  • News and media website — Political Dig, Bipartisan Report, Your Nation, LifeZette, Headline Politics
  • History Museum — Old Photo Archive
  • Media/news company — Greenville Gazettem Washington Press, Conservative Reporter, Conservative Tradition, The Daily Headline, The Conservative Republic, Newsiosity, The Angry Patriot, American Action News, America Now, Patriot Journal, Rare Journal, Conservative Review, Conservative Edition News, Western Journal US News, Rare Media, AWM, Liftable by WJ, Newsmax, Conservative News Today, The BL, The Western Journal
  • Hospital — Cleveland Clinic
  • Newspaper — Patriots United
  • Clothing (brand) — Chico's
  • Entertainment Website — AmoMama.com
  • Fan Page — We Love President Donald J. Trump
  • TV Network — Insp
  • Financial consultant — Conservative Post
 Analysis of these page likes provides the following assumptions of the general non-gaming preferences of the Easy Accessors over the age of 60:
  • 76% are married, and 66% are women. Most have older children.
  • Most work as managers, followed by teachers and librarians, those employed in social services, and finally those employed in finance.
  • 91% have a university degree.

NON-GAMING BRANDS

Data on this segment's Facebook brand page preferences (listed by category and brand name) has been collected from the Facebook subscribers who fit the Easy Accessors demographic profile — men and women over the age of 60, with interest in games (browser, board, card, casino, and online), college-educated, and married:
  • Media brands: Greenville Gazette, LifeZette, Washington Press
  • Retail brands: Chico's,
  • Sports brands: Vikings, Patriots
  • Outdoor and sporting goods company — RTIC Outdoors and Academy Sports + Outdoors
  • Travel company — Southwest Airlines
Analysis of these brand likes provides the following assumptions of the general non-gaming brand preferences of the Easy Accessors over the age of 60:
  • They are very interested in politics (both left-leaning and right-leaning).
  • This segment is willing and able to pay for quality but likes a bargain.
  • They are fans of different established media figures.

WAYS TO REACH

As the majority of this segment lies within Boomers, the following statistics apply to Easy Accessors in terms of marketing engagement:
  • The generation as a whole is used to working hard, and they value hard work. After reaching retirement age, they are seeking to enjoy a higher quality of life.
  • 59% of women in general (and thus an extension to the average Easy Accessor over the age of 60) are responsive to shopping offers sent by major retailers to their mobile phones.
  • They are specifically interested in medical aids such as medical alert system and hearing aids, as well as assisted living opportunities.
  • Baby boomers spend on average 27 hours per week online, compared to 25 hours per week registered for those who are between 16 and 34.
  • Facebook is by far the most popular social media site for this generation. Additionally, baby boomers are the most likely to take action based on what they read on social media.

PAIN POINTS

Based upon the above data, it is safe to assume that the average Easy Accessors is a very active online consumer. Following are several common pain points experienced by online shoppers:
  • Friendly formats such as larger fonts on retail websites, easier navigation, help buttons, and so on, are largely sought out by the generation of Easy Accessors.
  • While hesitant to try out new technologies, if there is enough assistance provided by online retail shops, the Easy Accessors will be willing to try out new things.
  • They are looking for shopping deals as they "transition to fixed incomes, meaning they’re more likely to value product discounts, rebates, or free shipping than their millennial counterparts."

RESEARCH STRATEGY

To build this profile, data was collated from sources like the EEDAR Gamer Segmentation Report, the Facebook Insights Tool, research from Facebook Gaming marketing reports, and additional highlights from media and market research findings. Please note that when using the Facebook Insights tool to provide the presented psychographic data, the following segments were chosen based upon assumptions from the corresponding demographic profile: age 60 and over, and interest choices of board games, browser games, card games, casino games, and online games. Some data points apply to multiple segments of the profiles within this project.
Part
04
of 40
Part
04

Transitionals (60+) - Non-Gaming Psychographics

To build a psychographic profile which details the non-gaming habits and preferences for the average Transitional Gamer, this data follows the basic demographic profile which was built in earlier research. This typical Transitional Gamer over the age of 60 is a mobile games player. As such, they share many traits in common with other gamers in their age bracket and likely still game their mobile device.

Online Habits

  • Gamers as a whole, and as an extension Transitional Gamer, are between 1.1 times and 1.5 times more likely to make purchases in the following categories than the general online population: entertainment, electronics, computers, smartphones, and cars.
  • 74% of gamers state that "they would pay more for top-quality media and entertainment products and services" and 85% indicate their willingness to "pay more for top quality consumer electronics products and services".
  • 73% are willing to pay more for top-quality food and beverage products and services.

Non-Gaming Websites

Data on this segment's Facebook page preferences (listed by category and page name) has been collected from the Facebook subscribers who fit the Transitional Gamer demographic profile — men and women over the age of 60, with interest in games (browser, board, card, casino, and online), college-educated, and married:
    • Politicians —Governor Jan Brewer, Joe Walsh, Joe Kennedy III, Rick Perry
    • Political organization — Fight Trump, Anti-Trump Army, OpsLens, Impeach Trump, Opposition Report
    • News Personality — Greta Van Susteren
    • Public figure — Marlo Thomas, Jay Sekulow
    • TV Network — Inspiration
    • Collectibles shop — The Bradford Exchange
    • Loan Service- Low VA Rates
    • Community Organization- AARP
    • News and media website — Patriots Unlimited
    • Breakfast & Brunch Restaurant — Cracker Barrel Old Country Store
    • Travel Agent — Bookvip.com
    • Non-profit organization — No Labels, FWD.us, ACLJ, Alliance Defending Freedom, FAIR
    • Community — Proud Progressive, Conservatives Today, Liberty Upheld, FutureinAmerica
    • Hospital- Cleveland Clinic
    • Website- The Good Old Days
    • Media company —Defense Of Freedom, Expose Trump, All That's Entertainment, US Chronicle
    • News- Greenville Gazette, Washington Press, Conservative Reporter, Conservative Tradition
    • Financial- Conservative Post
    • Travel Company- Viking
    • Fitness- 17% use wearables to track their steps. 48% are willing to do so.

    NON-GAMING BRANDS

    Data on this segment's Facebook brand page preferences (listed by category and brand name) has been collected from the Facebook subscribers who fit the Transitional Gamer demographic profile — men and women over 60, with interest in games (browser, board, card, casino, and online), college-educated, and married:
    • Sports- Silver Sneakers
    • Clothing Brand- Chico's
    • Beauty-Pond's, Oil of Olay, Neutrogena
    • Household- Tide, Heinz, Duracell, Samsung, Oil of
     Analysis of these page likes provides the following assumptions of the general non-gaming preferences of the Transitional Gamer between over the age of 60:
    • They are grandparents.
    • They are reminiscent of their past.
    • The group has a classic taste in music and are likely traditional in their views on politics and social issues.
    • This age group appreciates dependability and products that have withstood the test of time.

    Pain Points

    • They dislike pop-up ads and with growing technology ability, will install a blocker.
    • They have modified their behavior to skip sponsored results in searches.
    • They will remove a game from their phone if they feel it is a waste of time.
    • They do no like to have their personal data collected.
    • Small fonts and targets make usability poor for this age group.
    • Inflexible websites that only accept input in a specific format is a pain point.

    Research Strategy

    To build this profile, data was collated from sources like the EEDAR Gamer Segmentation Report, the Facebook Insights Tool, research from Facebook Gaming marketing reports, and additional highlights from media and market research findings. Please note that when using the Facebook Insights tool to provide the presented psychographic data, the following segments were chosen based upon assumptions from the corresponding demographic profile: Over 60 and interest choices of board games, browser games, card games, casino games, and online games. Some data points apply to multiple segments of the profiles within this project.

Part
05
of 40
Part
05

Incidental Players (45-60) - Non-Gaming Psychographics

To build a psychographic profile which details the non-gaming habits and preferences for the average Incidental Player, this data follows the basic demographic profile which was built in earlier research. This typical Incidental Player between 45 and 60 is female and prefers to play on her smartphone. She is most likely college-educated, married, and has children. She is more likely to make an in-game purchase than her male counterpart.

ONLINE HABITS

  • Gamers as a whole, and as an extension Incidental Player (which are likely college-educated with a higher than average income), are between 1.1 times and 1.5 times more likely to make purchases in the following categories than the general online population: entertainment, electronics, computers, smartphones, and cars.
  • 74% of gamers state that "they would pay more for top-quality media and entertainment products and services" and 85% indicate their willingness to "pay more for top quality consumer electronics products and services".
  • 73% are willing to pay more for top-quality food and beverage products and services.

NON-GAMING WEBSITES

Data on this segment's Facebook page preferences (listed by category and page name) has been collected from the Facebook subscribers who fit the Incidental Players demographic profile — men and women ages 45-60, with interest in games (browser, board, card, casino, and online), college-educated, and married:
  • Artist — Kirk Cameron
  • Weight loss centre — WW (formerly Weight Watchers)
  • Political organization — RightChangeForAmerica
  • Company — Box Tops for Education and Small Business Saturday
  • Politician — Paul Ryan, Mike Huckabee, Sarah Palin, and Mitt Romney
  • Food & drink — Paula Deen
  • Radio Station — K-LOVE Radio
  • TV Network — Hallmark Channel USA
  • Non-profit organization — Fly the American Flag, and Focus on the FamilyFreedomWorks
  • Comedian — Heather Land — I Ain't Doin It
  • Musician/Band — MercyMe Music, Third Day, Ted Nugent, and Casting Crowns
  • Government official — Senator Mitt Romney
  • Health & wellness website — Cleanfoodcrush
  • Entertainment Website — Trending on PopCulture.com, and I Love Classic Rock
  • News Personality — Rush Limbaugh, and Sean Hannity
  • Newspaper — IJR Red
  • Media — Simplemost
  • Product/Service — USCCA
  • News and media website — Being Conservative, Coupon Divas, One Country, Donald Trump Is Our President, Everything Inspirational, Supporting Our Veterans, Country Music Nation, Faves USA
  • Media/news company — SEC Country, Crosswalk.com, Tell Me Now, Amo, Mama Nostalgia, The Federalist Papers, JumbleJoy.com, Conservative Tribune by WJ
  • Author — Rory Feek, Allen West, and The Pioneer Woman — Ree Drummond
  • Breakfast & Brunch Restaurant — Cracker Barrel Old Country Store
  • Shopping & retail — Brad's Deals, RetailMeNotGroupon
  • Interest — Proud to be an American
  • Religious organization — Let's join forces as Christians and start a Jesus Christ revival! Press like if Jesus is your Savior!!!, God, VineI Can Do All Things Through Christ Who Strengthens Me, Proverbs 31 Ministries
  • Public figure — Dave Ramsey, Glenn Beck, Dr. Ben & Candy Carson, Joanna Gaines, George W. Bush, Franklin Graham, Jay Sekulow, Mike Rowe, and Jase Robertson
  • Website — ShopjClub
  • Supermarket/Convenience store — ALDI USA
  • Magazine — Southern Living
  • Book — My Bible
  • Community — The Tea Party Community by WJ
  • Actor — Phil Robertson "The Duck Commander"
  • Sportsperson — Dale Earnhardt Jr.
 Analysis of these page likes provides the following assumptions of the general non-gaming preferences of the Incidental Player between the ages of 45 and 60:
  • They are patriotic.
  • They have religious beliefs.
  • They are more conservative in their political beliefs and follow political leaders.

NON-GAMING BRANDS

Data on this segment's Facebook brand page preferences (listed by category and brand name) has been collected from the Facebook subscribers who fit the Incidental Players demographic profile — men and women ages 45-60, with interest in games (browser, board, card, casino, and online), college-educated, and married:
  • Food and drink company — Keurig, and Betty Crocker
  • Women's Clothes Shop — Chic Soul
  • Home decor — Pier 1, and Pottery Barn
  • Collectibles shop — The Bradford Exchange
  • Retail company — Personal Creations, HomeGoods, MobStub Daily Deals, QVC, Hobby Lobby, Belk, Big Lots, The Crock-Pot Brand, Wayfair, ShopAtHome.com, thredUP, T.J.Maxx, Lowe's Home Improvement, and Marshalls
  • Holiday home rental — HomeAway
  • Cruise line — Norwegian Cruise Line, Royal Caribbean International, and Carnival Cruise Line
  • Travel Agent — Bookvip.com
  • Discount shop — Dollar General
Analysis of these brand likes provides the following assumptions of the general non-gaming brand preferences of the Incidental Player between the ages of 45 and 60:
  • They enjoy travel, cruises in particular.
  • They frequently shop in home decor stores and do DIY.
  • While they shop at higher end home decor stores they also try to find bargains and like to save money.

WAYS TO REACH

As the majority of this segment lies within GenX, the following statistics apply to Incidental Players in terms of marketing engagement:
  • Approximately 75% watch YouTube videos which relate to past events or people.
  • People in the 45-60 age range look to reviews during their research process, and take these into consideration when choosing new products.
  • 68% connect with their kids and keep up with both world events and the trends that are important to their children by watching online content.
  • 73% use online content to teach themselves to do a DIY project. Pinterest can be a useful tool when marketing to women in this demographic.
  • 59% of women in general (and thus an extension to the average Incidental Players between 45 and 60) are responsive to shopping offers sent by major retailers to their mobile phones.
  • 43% would respond to shopping offers sent by restaurants and 29% to offers for entertainment offers like movies, festivals, concerts, and sporting events.
  • "Mobile gamers tend to be more receptive to advertising compared to non-gamers. Some 43% of mobile gamers say they are more likely to buy or use brands with ads they like, compared to 32% of non-gamers".
  • As this age range is that the latter end of GenX they are more likely to use Facebook than the other social media platforms.
  • Offline marketing should also be considered, and blended with online marketing. TV and radio are popular mediums for the 45-60 demographic.

PAIN POINTS

Based upon the above data, it is safe to assume that the average Incidental Player is a very active online consumer. Following are several common pain points experienced by online shoppers:
  • A common problem is "too many choices without any choosing support is a source of great consumer frustration". A potential solution is to have a "passionate and knowledgeable expert who helps them discover products they’ll love and offers them ways to easily and intuitively pick the product that’s right for THEM".
  • 50% of potential sales are lost because visitors to a website or online shopping cart can’t find what they are looking for.
  • "45% of US customers are likely to abandon an online purchase if they can’t find a quick answer to their question".
Additional insights:
  • The 45-60 demographic, although tech knowledgeable are not as tech savy as the younger generations. Easy to navigate websites and registration pages can help keep this group engaged.

RESEARCH STRATEGY

To build this profile, data was collated from sources like the EEDAR Gamer Segmentation Report, the Facebook Insights Tool, research from Facebook Gaming marketing reports, and additional highlights from media and market research findings. Please note that when using the Facebook Insights tool to provide the presented psychographic data, the following segments were chosen based upon assumptions from the corresponding demographic profile: age 45-60 and interest choices of board games, browser games, card games, casino games, and online games. Some data points apply to multiple segments of the profiles within this project.

Part
06
of 40
Part
06

Daily Dabblers (45-60) - Non-Gaming Psychographics

To build a psychographic profile which details the non-gaming habits and preferences for the average Daily Dabbler, this data follows the basic demographic profile which was built in earlier research. This typical Daily Dabbler between 45 and 60 is female and prefers to play on her smartphone. She is most likely college-educated, married, and has children. She is more likely to make an in-game purchase than her male counterpart.

ONLINE HABITS

  • Gamers as a whole, and as an extension Daily Dabbler (which are likely college-educated with a higher than average income), are between 1.1 times and 1.5 times more likely to make purchases in the following categories than the general online population: entertainment, electronics, computers, smartphones, and cars.
  • 74% of gamers state that "they would pay more for top-quality media and entertainment products and services" and 85% indicate their willingness to "pay more for top quality consumer electronics products and services".
  •  73% are willing to pay more for top-quality food and beverage products and services.

NON-GAMING WEBSITES

Data on this segment's Facebook page preferences (listed by category and page name) has been collected from the Facebook subscribers who fit the Daily Dabblers demographic profile — men and women ages 45-60, with interest in games (browser, board, card, casino, and online), college-educated, and married:
  • Artist — Kirk Cameron
  • Weight loss centre — WW (formerly Weight Watchers)
  • Political organization — RightChangeForAmerica
  • Company — Box Tops for Education and Small Business Saturday
  • Politician — Paul Ryan, Mike Huckabee, Sarah Palin, and Mitt Romney
  • Food & drink — Paula Deen
  • Radio Station — K-LOVE Radio
  • TV Network — Hallmark Channel USA
  • Non-profit organization — Fly the American Flag, and Focus on the FamilyFreedomWorks
  • Comedian — Heather Land — I Ain't Doin It
  • Musician/Band — MercyMe Music, Third Day, Ted Nugent, and Casting Crowns
  • Government official — Senator Mitt Romney
  • Health & wellness website — Cleanfoodcrush
  • Entertainment Website — Trending on PopCulture.com, and I Love Classic Rock
  • News Personality — Rush Limbaugh, and Sean Hannity
  • Newspaper — IJR Red
  • Media — Simplemost
  • Product/Service — USCCA
  • News and media website — Being Conservative, Coupon Divas, One Country, Donald Trump Is Our President, Everything Inspirational, Supporting Our Veterans, Country Music Nation, Faves USA
  • Media/news company — SEC Country, Crosswalk.com, Tell Me Now, Amo, Mama Nostalgia, The Federalist Papers, JumbleJoy.com, Conservative Tribune by WJ
  • Author — Rory Feek, Allen West, and The Pioneer Woman — Ree Drummond
  • Breakfast & Brunch Restaurant — Cracker Barrel Old Country Store
  • Shopping & retail — Brad's Deals, RetailMeNotGroupon
  • Interest — Proud to be an American
  • Religious organization — Let's join forces as Christians and start a Jesus Christ revival! Press like if Jesus is your Savior!!!, God, VineI Can Do All Things Through Christ Who Strengthens Me, Proverbs 31 Ministries
  • Public figure — Dave Ramsey, Glenn Beck, Dr. Ben & Candy Carson, Joanna Gaines, George W. Bush, Franklin Graham, Jay Sekulow, Mike Rowe, and Jase Robertson
  • Website — ShopjClub
  • Supermarket/Convenience store — ALDI USA
  • Magazine — Southern Living
  • Book — My Bible
  • Community — The Tea Party Community by WJ
  • Actor — Phil Robertson "The Duck Commander"
  • Sportsperson — Dale Earnhardt Jr.
 Analysis of these page likes provides the following assumptions of the general non-gaming preferences of the Daily Dabbler between the ages of 45 and 60:
  • They are patriotic.
  • They have religious beliefs.
  • They are more conservative in their political beliefs and follow political leaders.

NON-GAMING BRANDS

Data on this segment's Facebook brand page preferences (listed by category and brand name) has been collected from the Facebook subscribers who fit the Daily Dabblers demographic profile — men and women ages 45-60, with interest in games (browser, board, card, casino, and online), college-educated, and married:
  • Food and drink company — Keurig, and Betty Crocker
  • Women's Clothes Shop — Chic Soul
  • Home decor — Pier 1, and Pottery Barn
  • Collectibles shop — The Bradford Exchange
  • Retail company — Personal Creations, HomeGoods, MobStub Daily Deals, QVC, Hobby Lobby, Belk, Big Lots, The Crock-Pot Brand, Wayfair, ShopAtHome.com, thredUP, T.J.Maxx, Lowe's Home Improvement, and Marshalls
  • Holiday home rental — HomeAway
  • Cruise line — Norwegian Cruise Line, Royal Caribbean International, and Carnival Cruise Line
  • Travel Agent — Bookvip.com
  • Discount shop — Dollar General
Analysis of these brand likes provides the following assumptions of the general non-gaming brand preferences of the Daily Dabbler between the ages of 45 and 60:
  • They enjoy travel, cruises in particular.
  • They frequently shop in home decor stores and do DIY.
  • While they shop at higher end home decor stores they also try to find bargains and like to save money.

WAYS TO REACH

As the majority of this segment lies within GenX, the following statistics apply to Daily Dabblers in terms of marketing engagement:
  • Approximately 75% watch YouTube videos which relate to past events or people.
  • People in the 45-60 age range look to reviews during their research process, and take these into consideration when choosing new products.
  • 68% connect with their kids and keep up with both world events and the trends that are important to their children by watching online content.
  • 73% use online content to teach themselves to do a DIY project.
  •  59% of women in general (and thus an extension to the average Daily Dabbler between 45 and 60) are responsive to shopping offers sent by major retailers to their mobile phones.
  • 43% would respond to shopping offers sent by restaurants and 29% to offers for entertainment offers like movies, festivals, concerts, and sporting events.
  • "Mobile gamers tend to be more receptive to advertising compared to non-gamers. Some 43% of mobile gamers say they are more likely to buy or use brands with ads they like, compared to 32% of non-gamers".
  • As this age range is that the latter end of GenX they are more likely to use Facebook than the other social media platforms.
  • Offline marketing should also be considered, and blended with online marketing. TV and radio are popular mediums for the 45-60 demographic.

PAIN POINTS

Based upon the above data, it is safe to assume that the average Daily Dabbler is a very active online consumer. Following are several common pain points experienced by online shoppers:
  • A common problem is "too many choices without any choosing support is a source of great consumer frustration". A potential solution is to have a "passionate and knowledgeable expert who helps them discover products they’ll love and offers them ways to easily and intuitively pick the product that’s right for THEM".
  • 50% of potential sales are lost because visitors to a website or online shopping cart can’t find what they are looking for.
  • "45% of US customers are likely to abandon an online purchase if they can’t find a quick answer to their question".
Additional insights:
  • The 45-60 demographic, although tech knowledgeable are not as tech savy as the younger generations. Easy to navigate websites and registration pages can help keep this group engaged.

RESEARCH STRATEGY

To build this profile, data was collated from sources like the EEDAR Gamer Segmentation Report, the Facebook Insights Tool, research from Facebook Gaming marketing reports, and additional highlights from media and market research findings. Please note that when using the Facebook Insights tool to provide the presented psychographic data, the following segments were chosen based upon assumptions from the corresponding demographic profile: age 45-60 and interest choices of board games, browser games, card games, casino games, and online games. Some data points apply to multiple segments of the profiles within this project.

Part
07
of 40
Part
07

Easy Accessors (45-60) - Non-Gaming Psychographics

To build a psychographic profile which details the non-gaming habits and preferences for the average Easy Accessor, this data follows the basic demographic profile which was built in earlier research. This typical Easy Accessor gamer between 45 and 60 is female and mostly plays casual games. Her favorite offline gaming concepts are puzzles, cards, casinos, and Monopoly. She is most likely college-educated, married, and has children. She is more likely to make an in-game purchase than her male counterpart.

ONLINE HABITS

  • 82% of gamers are considering family a top priority (compared to 68% of the non-gaming population), feel more positive about their aspirations (67% compared to 42% of the non-gaming population), and want to positively impact society (61% compared to 35% of the non-gaming population).
  • Gamers as a whole, and as an extension Easy Accessors (which are likely college-educated with a higher than average income), are between 1.1 times and 1.5 times more likely to make purchases in the following categories than the general online population: entertainment, electronics, computers, smartphones, and cars.
  • Online habits of gamers include spending time online to pass time, because it is cheap or free, the fact online can be accessed from anywhere, and the fact it is convenient.
  • 73% are willing to pay more for top-quality food and beverage products and services.

NON-GAMING WEBSITES

Data on this segment's Facebook page preferences (listed by category and page name) has been collected from the Facebook subscribers who fit the Easy Accessors demographic profile — men and women ages 45-60, with interest in games (browser, board, card, casino, and online), college-educated, and married:
  • Politicians — Paul Ryan, Mike Huckabee, Sarah Palin, Mitt Romney
  • Political organization — RightChange, ForAmerica
  • News Personality — Rush Limbaugh, Sean Hannity
  • Home decor — Pottery Barn, Pier 1
  • Public figure — Diamond And Silk, Dave Ramsey, Glenn Beck, Mike Rowe
  • Radio Station — K-LOVE Radio
  • TV Network — Hallmark Channel USA
  • Collectibles shop — The Bradford Exchange
  • Shopping & retail — Brad's Deals, RetailMe, NotGroupon
  • Retail company — HomeGoods, Mob, Stub Daily Deals, QVC, Hobby Lobby, thredUP, Life is Good
  • Breakfast & Brunch Restaurant — Cracker Barrel Old Country Store
  • News and media website — Being Conservative, One Country, Supporting Our Veterans
  • Breakfast & Brunch Restaurant — Cracker Barrel Old Country Store
  • Entertainment Website — Trending on PopCulture.com, I Love Classic Rock
  • Travel Agent — Bookvip.com
  • Non-profit organization — Fly the American Flag, Focus on the Family, FreedomWorks
  • Community — The Tea Party Community by WJ
  • Religious organization — Proverbs 31 Ministries, GodVine
  • Restaurant — Outback Steakhouse
  • Media/news company — SEC Country, Crosswalk.com, Breitbart, Conservative Tribune by WJ
  • Actor — Phil Robertson "The Duck Commander"
 Analysis of these page likes provides the following assumptions of the general non-gaming preferences of the Easy Accessors between the ages of 45 and 60:
  • They are likely parents with younger children.
  • They are bargain-seekers.
  • The group has a late-90s taste in music and are likely traditional in their views on politics and social issues.

NON-GAMING BRANDS

Data on this segment's Facebook brand page preferences (listed by category and brand name) has been collected from the Facebook subscribers who fit the Easy Accessors demographic profile — men and women ages 45-60, with interest in games (browser, board, card, casino, and online), college-educated, and married:
  • Artists — Jimmy Buffett and the Coral Reefers, Kirk Cameron, MercyMe
  • Public figures — Diamond and Silk, Mike Huckabee, Dave Ramsey
  • Lifestyle brands — Weightwatchers, Clean Food Crush
  • Politicians — Paul Ryan, Sarah Palin
  • Homeware brands — HomeGoods, Keurig, Hobby Lobby, Pier 1, Lowe's Home Improvement
  • Travel — Norwegian Cruise Line, Southwest Airlines, Carnival Cruise Line
  • Retail brands — QVC, Aldi, ThredUP, TJMaxx
  • Media brands — Southern Living, Fox, Breitbart
Analysis of these brand likes provides the following assumptions of the general non-gaming brand preferences of the Easy Accessors between the ages of 45 and 60:
  • They are seeking discounts when it comes to clothing and groceries, and are happy to shop at discount retail shops.
  • The majority of the group is right-leaning, and are heavily focused on Republican media outlets.
  • Cruises are the most popular travel options.
  • Lifestyle choices are prioritized based on fitness and weigh loss.

WAYS TO REACH

As the majority of this segment lies within GenX, the following statistics apply to Easy Accessors in terms of marketing engagement:
  • Approximately 75% watch YouTube videos which relate to past events or people.
  • 68% connect with their kids and keep up with both world events and the trends that are important to their children by watching online content.
  • 73% use online content to teach themselves to do a DIY project.
  • 59% of women in general (and thus an extension to the average Easy Accessors between 45 and 60) are responsive to shopping offers sent by major retailers to their mobile phones.
  • 43% would respond to shopping offers sent by restaurants and 29% to offers for entertainment offers like movies, festivals, concerts, and sporting events.
  • Mobile gamers tend to be more receptive to "advertising compared to non-gamers. Some 43% of mobile gamers say they are more likely to buy or use brands with ads they like, compared to 32% of non-gamers".

PAIN POINTS

Based upon the above data, it is safe to assume that the average Easy Accessor is a very active online consumer. Following are several common pain points experienced by online shoppers:
  • A common problem is "too many choices without any choosing support is a source of great consumer frustration". A potential solution is to have a "passionate and knowledgeable expert who helps them discover products they’ll love and offers them ways to easily and intuitively pick the product that’s right for THEM".
  • 50% of potential sales are lost because visitors to a website or online shopping cart can’t find what they are looking for.
  • "45% of US customers are likely to abandon an online purchase if they can’t find a quick answer to their question".

RESEARCH STRATEGY

To build this profile, data was collated from sources like the EEDAR Gamer Segmentation Report, the Facebook Insights Tool, research from Facebook Gaming marketing reports, and additional highlights from media and market research findings. Please note that when using the Facebook Insights tool to provide the presented psychographic data, the following segments were chosen based upon assumptions from the corresponding demographic profile: age 45-60 and interest choices of board games, browser games, card games, casino games, and online games. Some data points apply to multiple segments of the profiles within this project.
Part
08
of 40
Part
08

Transitionals (45-60) - Non-Gaming Psychographics

To build a psychographic profile which details the non-gaming habits and preferences for the average Transitional, this data follows the basic demographic profile which was built in earlier research. This typical Transitional gamer between 45 and 60 is in the process of transitioning from PC and console gaming to mobile gaming due to changes in their lives, e.g., raising a family. As such, they share many traits in common with other gamers in their age bracket and likely still game on PC and/or console when circumstances allow.

Online Habits

  • Gamers as a whole, and as an extension Transitionals, are between 1.1 times and 1.5 times more likely to make purchases in the following categories than the general online population: entertainment, electronics, computers, smartphones, and cars.
  • 74% of gamers state that "they would pay more for top-quality media and entertainment products and services" and 85% indicate their willingness to "pay more for top quality consumer electronics products and services".
  • 73% are willing to pay more for top-quality food and beverage products and services.

Non-Gaming Websites

Data on this segment's Facebook page preferences (listed by category and page name) has been collected from the Facebook subscribers who fit the Transitionals demographic profile — men and women ages 45-60, with interest in games (browser, board, card, casino, and online), college-educated, and married:
  • Politicians —Sarah Palin, Mitt Romney, Paul Ryan
  • Political organization — RightChange, ForAmerica
  • News Personality — Sean Hannity
  • Public figure — Glenn Beck, Mike Rowe, Iyania Vanzant, Dave Ramsey, Medical Medium
  • TV Network — Hallmark Channel, USA, PBS, OWN: Oprah Winfrey
  • Collectibles shop — The Bradford Exchange
  • Shopping & retail — Brad's Deals, RetailMeNot, Groupon
  • Retail company — Mob, Stub Daily Deals, QVC, Home Goods, Big Lots, ShopAtHome.com
  • Breakfast & Brunch Restaurant — Cracker Barrel Old Country Store
  • News and media website — Being Conservative, One Country, Supporting Our Veterans
  • Breakfast & Brunch Restaurant — Cracker Barrel Old Country Store
  • Entertainment Website —I Love Classic Rock, TrendingonPopCulture.com
  • Travel Agent — Bookvip.com
  • Non-profit organization — Wounded Warrior Project, Focus in the Family, The Veteran's Site, FreedomWorks
  • Community — Oldtimers, Do You Rememeber?
  • Religious organization — GodVine
  • Restaurant — Outback Steakhouse, Red Lobster
  • Media/news company — SEC Country, AmoMama Nostalgia, JumbleJoy.com, The Inquisitr, Fabiosa Daily
  • Actor —Kirk Cameron
  • Food Personality- Paula Deen
 Analysis of these page likes provides the following assumptions of the general non-gaming preferences of the Transitionals between the ages of 45 and 60:
  • They are likely parents, some even grandparents.
  • They are bargain-seekers.
  • The group has a classic taste in music and are likely traditional in their views on politics and social issues.

NON-GAMING BRANDS

Data on this segment's Facebook brand page preferences (listed by category and brand name) has been collected from the Facebook subscribers who fit the Transitionals demographic profile — men and women ages 45-60, with interest in games (browser, board, card, casino, and online), college-educated, and married:
  • Household Supplies — Tide
  • Food & Beverage Companies- Keurig, Betty Crocker, Publix
  • Authors— Allen West, James Patterson, The Pioneer Woman- Ree Drummond
  • Lifestyle brands — Weightwatchers
  • Musicians—Ted Nugent, Stevie Nicks, Kid Rock, Journey
  • Homeware brands — HomeGoods, Big Lots
  • Travel — Norwegian Cruise Line, Southwest Airlines, Carnival Cruise Line
  • Retail brands — Dollar General, Whole Foods
  • Media brands — Southern Living, The Shred, Being Conservative, One Country Nation
 Analysis of these page likes provides the following assumptions of the general non-gaming preferences of the Transitionals between the ages of 45 and 60:
  • They are seeking discounts when it comes to clothing and groceries, and are happy to shop at discount retail shops.
  • The majority of the group is right-leaning, and are heavily focused on Republican media outlets.
  • Cruises are the most popular travel options.

Ways To Reach

  • Approximately 75% watch YouTube videos which relate to past events or people.
  • 68% connect with their kids and keep up with both world events and the trends that are important to their children by watching online content.
  • 73% use online content to teach themselves to do a DIY project.
  • 59% of women in general (and thus an extension to the average Transitional between 45 and 60) are responsive to shopping offers sent by major retailers to their mobile phones.
  • 43% would respond to shopping offers sent by restaurants and 29% to offers for entertainment offers like movies, festivals, concerts, and sporting events.
  •  Mobile gamers tend to be more receptive to "advertising compared to non-gamers. Some 43% of mobile gamers say they are more likely to buy or use brands with ads they like, compared to 32% of non-gamers.

Pain Points

  • Based upon the above data, it is safe to assume that the average Transitional is a very active online consumer. Following are several common pain points experienced by online shoppers:
  • A common problem is "too many choices without any choosing support is a source of great consumer frustration". A potential solution is to have a "passionate and knowledgeable expert who helps them discover products they’ll love and offers them ways to easily and intuitively pick the product that’s right for THEM".
  • 50% of potential sales are lost because visitors to a website or online shopping cart can’t find what they are looking for.
  • 45% of US customers are likely to abandon an online purchase if they can’t find a quick answer to their question.

Research Strategy

To build this profile, data was collated from sources like the EEDAR Gamer Segmentation Report, the Facebook Insights Tool, research from Facebook Gaming marketing reports, and additional highlights from media and market research findings. Please note that when using the Facebook Insights tool to provide the presented psychographic data, the following segments were chosen based upon assumptions from the corresponding demographic profile: age 45-60 and interest choices of board games, browser games, card games, casino games, and online games. Some data points apply to multiple segments of the profiles within this project.
Part
09
of 40
Part
09

Incidental Players (35-45) - Non-Gaming Psychographics

To build a psychographic profile which details the non-gaming habits and preferences for the average Incidental, this data follows the basic demographic profile which was built in earlier research. This typical Incidental player between 35 and 45 is female and prefers to play on her smartphone. She is most likely college-educated, married, and has children. She is more likely to make an in-game purchase than her male counterpart.

ONLINE HABITS

  • Gamers as a whole, and as an extension Incidental Players (which are likely college-educated with a higher than average income), are between 1.1 times and 1.5 times more likely to make purchases in the following categories than the general online population: entertainment, electronics, computers, smartphones, and cars.
  •  74% of gamers state that "they would pay more for top-quality media and entertainment products and services" and 85% indicate their willingness to "pay more for top quality consumer electronics products and services".
  •  73% are willing to pay more for top-quality food and beverage products and services.

NON-GAMING WEBSITES

Data on this segment's Facebook page preferences (listed by category and page name) has been collected from the Facebook subscribers who fit the Incidental Players demographic profile — men and women ages 35-45, with interest in games (browser, board, card, casino, and online), college-educated, and married:
  • Water Park — Great Wolf Lodge
  • Education Website — Positive Parenting Solutions
  • Home decor — Canvas On Demand, Smallwoods, and Pier 1
  • Blogger — 100 Days of Real Food and Skinnytaste
  • Baby Goods/Kids Goods — The Elf on the Shelf, Pampers, Carter's, and Gerber
  • TV Network — Disney Junior
  • Community — Bringing Home the Browns, Crock Pot Girl, and Scary Mommy
  • News and media website — Coupon Divas
  • Health & wellness website — Cleanfoodcrush
  • Media/news company — The SpruceParents and The Penny Hoarder
  • Artist — Candace Cameron Bure and Kirk Cameron
  • Product/Service — Beachbody, The Honest Company, Crayola, and Zillow
  • Comedian — imomsohard, The Holderness Family, Heather Land - I Ain't Doin It, John Crist, and Darren Knight
  • Film — Vacation
  • Public figure — The Krazy Coupon Lady, Dave Ramsey, That's Inappropriate, Joanna Gaines, Juggling The Jenkins, Mike Rowe, Jase Robertson, and Kristina Kuzmic
  • Travel Agent — Bookvip.com
  • Shopping & retail — American Girl, Brad's Deals, Groupon, and Michael's Stores
  • TV Program — This Is Us and Counting On
  • Author — Rory Feek and Ree Drummond
  • Journalist — Dan Rather
  • Fitness Trainer — Jillian Michaels
  • Non-profit organization — Focus on the Family
  • Teen & children's website — A Mighty Girl
  • Radio Station — K-LOVE Radio
  • Musician/Band — Dave Matthews Band
  • Entertainment Website — Trending on PopCulture.com
 Analysis of these page likes provides the following assumptions of the general non-gaming preferences of the Incidental Player between the ages of 35 and 45:
  • They are likely parents with younger children
  • They are bargain-seekers
  • Have a late-90s taste in music and are likely traditional in their views on politics and social issues.

NON-GAMING BRANDS

Data on this segment's Facebook brand page preferences (listed by category and brand name) has been collected from the Facebook subscribers who fit the Incidental Players demographic profile — men and women ages 35-45, with interest in games (browser, board, card, casino, and online), college-educated, and married:
  • Clothing shop — LOFT and Zappos.com
  • Clothing (brand) — Lolly Wolly Doodle and Old Navy
  • Cruise line — Disney Cruise Line and Carnival Cruise Line
  • Weight loss center — WW (formerly Weight Watchers)
  • Retail company — Pottery Barn Kids, Personal Creations, The Children's Place, Babies"R"Us, Toys''R''Us, HomeGoods, Pottery Barn, maurices, Hobby Lobby, Target, Zulily, thredUP, T.J.Maxx, Lowe's Home Improvement, Marshalls, Wayfair, and Sam's Club
  • Outdoor and sporting goods company — RTIC Outdoors and Academy Sports + Outdoors
  • Furniture Shop — IKEA
  • Supermarket/Convenience store — ALDI USA
  • Food and drink company — Keurig
  • Specialist Food Shop — Whole Foods Market
  • Rental shop — Redbox
  • Health/Beauty — Dollar Shave Club
  • Company — Stitch Fix, Shutterfly, and Box Tops for Education
  • Shoes — DSW Designer Shoe Warehouse
  • Cafe — Panera Bread
  • Travel company — Southwest Airlines
Analysis of these brand likes provides the following assumptions of the general non-gaming brand preferences of the Incidental Player between the ages of 35 and 45:
  • They are health and fitness conscious.
  • This segment is willing and able to pay for quality but likes a bargain.
  • Likely weekend DIYers.
  • They are fans of outdoor activities and travel.

WAYS TO REACH

As the majority of this segment lies within GenX, the following statistics apply to Incidental Players in terms of marketing engagement:
  • Approximately 75% watch YouTube videos which relate to past events or people.
  • 68% connect with their kids and keep up with both world events and the trends that are important to their children by watching online content.
  • 73% use online content to teach themselves to do a DIY project.
  •  59% of women in general (and thus an extension to the average Incidental Player between 35 and 45) are responsive to shopping offers sent by major retailers to their mobile phones.
  •  43% would respond to shopping offers sent by restaurants and 29% to offers for entertainment offers like movies, festivals, concerts, and sporting events.
  • "Mobile gamers tend to be more receptive to advertising compared to non-gamers. Some 43% of mobile gamers say they are more likely to buy or use brands with ads they like, compared to 32% of non-gamers".

PAIN POINTS

Based upon the above data, it is safe to assume that the average Incidental Player is a very active online consumer. Following are several common pain points experienced by online shoppers:
  • A common problem is "too many choices without any choosing support is a source of great consumer frustration". A potential solution is to have a "passionate and knowledgeable expert who helps them discover products they’ll love and offers them ways to easily and intuitively pick the product that’s right for THEM".
  • 50% of potential sales are lost because visitors to a website or online shopping cart can’t find what they are looking for.
  • "45% of US customers are likely to abandon an online purchase if they can’t find a quick answer to their question".

RESEARCH STRATEGY

To build this profile, data was collated from sources like the EEDAR Gamer Segmentation Report, the Facebook Insights Tool, research from Facebook Gaming marketing reports, and additional highlights from media and market research findings. Please note that when using the Facebook Insights tool to provide the presented psychographic data, the following segments were chosen based upon assumptions from the corresponding demographic profile: age 35-45 and interest choices of board games, browser games, card games, casino games, and online games. Some data points apply to multiple segments of the profiles within this project.

Part
10
of 40
Part
10

Daily Dabblers (35-45) - Non-Gaming Psychographics

To build a psychographic profile which details the non-gaming habits and preferences for the average Daily Dabbler, this data follows the basic demographic profile which was built in earlier research. This typical Daily Dabbler gamer between 35 and 45 is female and prefers to play on her smartphone. She is most likely college-educated, married, and has children. She is more likely to make an in-game purchase than her male counterpart.

ONLINE HABITS

  • Gamers as a whole, and as an extension Daily Dabblers (which are likely college-educated with a higher than average income), are between 1.1 times and 1.5 times more likely to make purchases in the following categories than the general online population: entertainment, electronics, computers, smartphones, and cars.
  • 74% of gamers state that "they would pay more for top-quality media and entertainment products and services" and 85% indicate their willingness to "pay more for top quality consumer electronics products and services".
  • 73% are willing to pay more for top-quality food and beverage products and services.

NON-GAMING WEBSITES

Data on this segment's Facebook page preferences (listed by category and page name) has been collected from the Facebook subscribers who fit the Daily Dabblers demographic profile — men and women ages 35-45, with interest in games (browser, board, card, casino, and online), college-educated, and married:
  • Water Park — Great Wolf Lodge
  • Education Website — Positive Parenting Solutions
  • Home decor — Canvas On Demand, Smallwoods, and Pier 1
  • Blogger — 100 Days of Real Food and Skinnytaste
  • Baby Goods/Kids Goods — The Elf on the Shelf, Pampers, Carter's, and Gerber
  • TV Network — Disney Junior
  • Community — Bringing Home the Browns, Crock Pot Girl, and Scary Mommy
  • News and media website — Coupon Divas
  • Health & wellness website — Cleanfoodcrush
  • Media/news company — The SpruceParents and The Penny Hoarder
  • Artist — Candace Cameron Bure and Kirk Cameron
  • Product/Service — Beachbody, The Honest Company, Crayola, and Zillow
  • Comedian — imomsohard, The Holderness Family, Heather Land - I Ain't Doin It, John Crist, and Darren Knight
  • Film — Vacation
  • Public figure — The Krazy Coupon Lady, Dave Ramsey, That's Inappropriate, Joanna Gaines, Juggling The Jenkins, Mike Rowe, Jase Robertson, and Kristina Kuzmic
  • Travel Agent — Bookvip.com
  • Shopping & retail — American Girl, Brad's Deals, Groupon, and Michael's Stores
  • TV Program — This Is Us and Counting On
  • Author — Rory Feek and Ree Drummond
  • Journalist — Dan Rather
  • Fitness Trainer — Jillian Michaels
  • Non-profit organization — Focus on the Family
  • Teen & children's website — A Mighty Girl
  • Radio Station — K-LOVE Radio
  • Musician/Band — Dave Matthews Band
  • Entertainment Website — Trending on PopCulture.com
 Analysis of these page likes provides the following assumptions of the general non-gaming preferences of the Daily Dabbler between the ages of 35 and 45:
  • They are likely parents with younger children
  • They are bargain-seekers
  • Have a late-90s taste in music and are likely traditional in their views on politics and social issues.

NON-GAMING BRANDS

Data on this segment's Facebook brand page preferences (listed by category and brand name) has been collected from the Facebook subscribers who fit the Daily Dabblers demographic profile - men and women ages 35-45, with interest in games (browser, board, card, casino, and online), college-educated, and married:
  • Clothing shop — LOFT and Zappos.com
  • Clothing (brand) — Lolly Wolly Doodle and Old Navy
  • Cruise line — Disney Cruise Line and Carnival Cruise Line
  • Weight loss center — WW (formerly Weight Watchers)
  • Retail company — Pottery Barn Kids, Personal Creations, The Children's Place, Babies"R"Us, Toys''R''Us, HomeGoods, Pottery Barn, maurices, Hobby Lobby, Target, Zulily, thredUP, T.J.Maxx, Lowe's Home Improvement, Marshalls, Wayfair, and Sam's Club
  • Outdoor and sporting goods company — RTIC Outdoors and Academy Sports + Outdoors
  • Furniture Shop — IKEA
  • Supermarket/Convenience store — ALDI USA
  • Food and drink company — Keurig
  • Specialist Food Shop — Whole Foods Market
  • Rental shop — Redbox
  • Health/Beauty — Dollar Shave Club
  • Company — Stitch Fix, Shutterfly, and Box Tops for Education
  • Shoes — DSW Designer Shoe Warehouse
  • CaféPanera Bread
  • Travel company — Southwest Airlines
Analysis of these brand likes provides the following assumptions of the general non-gaming brand preferences of the Daily Dabbler between the ages of 35 and 45:
  • They are health and fitness conscious.
  • This segment is willing and able to pay for quality but likes a bargain.
  • Likely weekend DIYers.
  • They are fans of outdoor activities and travel.

WAYS TO REACH

As the majority of this segment lies within GenX, the following statistics apply to Daily Dabblers in terms of marketing engagement:
  • Approximately 75% watch YouTube videos which relate to past events or people.
  • 68% connect with their kids and keep up with both world events and the trends that are important to their children by watching online content.
  • 73% use online content to teach themselves to do a DIY project.
  • 59% of women in general (and thus an extension to the average Daily Dabbler between 35 and 45) are responsive to shopping offers sent by major retailers to their mobile phones.
  • 43% would respond to shopping offers sent by restaurants and 29% to offers for entertainment offers like movies, festivals, concerts, and sporting events.
  • "Mobile gamers tend to be more receptive to advertising compared to non-gamers. Some 43% of mobile gamers say they are more likely to buy or use brands with ads they like, compared to 32% of non-gamers".

PAIN POINTS

Based upon the above data, it is safe to assume that the average Daily Dabber is a very active online consumer. Following are several common pain points experienced by online shoppers:
  • A common problem is "too many choices without any choosing support is a source of great consumer frustration". A potential solution is to have a "passionate and knowledgeable expert who helps them discover products they’ll love and offers them ways to easily and intuitively pick the product that’s right for THEM".
  • 50% of potential sales are lost because visitors to a website or online shopping cart can’t find what they are looking for.
  • "45% of US customers are likely to abandon an online purchase if they can’t find a quick answer to their question".

RESEARCH STRATEGY

To build this profile, data was collated from sources like the EEDAR Gamer Segmentation Report, the Facebook Insights Tool, research from Facebook Gaming marketing reports, and additional highlights from media and market research findings. Please note that when using the Facebook Insights tool to provide the presented psychographic data, the following segments were chosen based upon assumptions from the corresponding demographic profile: age 35-45 and interest choices of board games, browser games, card games, casino games, and online games. Some data points apply to multiple segments of the profiles within this project.

Part
11
of 40
Part
11

Easy Accessors (35-45) - Non-Gaming Psychographics

To build a psychographic profile which details the non-gaming habits and preferences for the average Easy Accessor, this data follows the basic demographic profile which was built in earlier research. This typical Easy Accessor gamer between 35 and 45 is female and prefers to play casual games which include puzzle games, card games, casino games, and classic arcade games. She is most likely college-educated, married, and has children. She is more likely to make an in-game purchase than her male counterpart.

ONLINE HABITS

  • Gamers as a whole, and as an extension Easy Accessors (which are likely college-educated with a higher than average income), are between 1.1 times and 1.5 times more likely to make purchases in the following categories than the general online population: entertainment, electronics, computers, smartphones, and cars.
  • 74% of gamers state that "they would pay more for top-quality media and entertainment products and services" and 85% indicate their willingness to "pay more for top quality consumer electronics products and services".
  • 73% are willing to pay more for top-quality food and beverage products and services.

NON-GAMING WEBSITES

Data on this segment's Facebook page preferences (listed by category and page name) has been collected from the Facebook subscribers who fit the Easy Accessors demographic profile — men and women ages 35-45, with interest in games (browser, mobile, other online, puzzle games, card games, casino games, and classic arcade games), college-educated, and married:
  • Baby Goods/Kids Goods — Pampers, Carter's
  • Comedian — The Holderness Family, Rickey Smiley, Heather Land — I Ain't Doin It
  • Women's Clothes Shop — Lane Bryant
  • Community — Scary Mommy
  • Media/news company — The Spruce, Throwbacks, The Penny Hoarder
  • Musician/Band — Kandi Burruss, Jill Scott, Miss Jill Scott, Dave Matthews Band, Maxwell
  • Public figure — The Krazy Coupon Lady, Dave Ramsey, Derrick Jaxn, Juggling The Jenkins
  • Product/Service — Beachbody, The Honest Company, Crayola, and Zillow
  • Comedian — imomsohard, The Holderness Family, Heather Land — I Ain't Doin It, John Crist, and Darren Knight
  • Water Park — Great Wolf Lodge
  • Education Website — Positive Parenting Solutions
  • Home decor — Canvas On Demand, Smallwoods, and Pier 1
  • Blogger — 100 Days of Real Food and Skinnytaste
  • TV Network — Disney Junior
  • TV Programme — A&E Investigates: The First 48, This Is Us
  • Community — Bringing Home the Browns, Crock Pot Girl, and Scary Mommy
Analysis of these page likes provides the following assumptions of the general non-gaming preferences of the Easy Accessor between the ages of 35 and 45:
  • They are likely parents with younger children.
  • They are bargain-seekers.
  • The group has a late-90s taste in music and are likely traditional in their views on politics and social issues.

NON-GAMING BRANDS

Data on this segment's Facebook brand page preferences (listed by category and brand name) has been collected from the Facebook subscribers who fit the Easy Accessors demographic profile — men and women ages 35-45, with interest in games (browser, mobile, other online, puzzle games, card games, casino games, and classic arcade games), college-educated, and married:
  • Baby Goods/Kids Goods — Pampers, Carter's
  • Brewery — Budweiser, Bud Light
  • Travel Agent — Bookvip.com
  • Cinema — Regal
  • Clothing shop — LOFT and Zappos.com
  • Clothing (brand) — Lolly Wolly Doodle and Old Navy
  • Cruise line — Disney Cruise Line and Carnival Cruise Line
  • Weight loss center — WW (formerly Weight Watchers)
  • Retail company — Pottery Barn Kids, Personal Creations, The Children's Place, Babies"R"Us, Toys''R''Us, HomeGoods, Pottery Barn, maurices, Hobby Lobby, Target, Zulily, thredUP, T.J.Maxx, Lowe's Home Improvement, Marshalls, Wayfair, and Sam's Club
  • Outdoor and sporting goods company — RTIC Outdoors and Academy Sports + Outdoors
  • Furniture Shop — IKEA
  • Supermarket/Convenience store — ALDI USA
  • Food and drink company — Keurig, Dos Equis, Betty Crocker
  • Italian Restaurant — Olive Garden
  • Specialist Food Shop — Whole Foods Market
  • Rental shop — Redbox
  • Retail company — The Children's Place, Babies"R"Us, Toys''R''Us, HomeGoods, Marshalls
  • Health/Beauty — Dollar Shave Club
  • Company — Stitch Fix, Shutterfly, and Box Tops for Education
  • Shoes — DSW Designer Shoe Warehouse
  • Café — Panera Bread
  • Sport & recreation — Tough Mudder
  • Seafood Restaurant — Red Lobster
Analysis of these brand likes provides the following assumptions of the general non-gaming brand preferences of the Easy Accessor between the ages of 35 and 45:
  • They are health and fitness conscious.
  • This segment is willing and able to pay for quality but likes a bargain.
  • Likely weekend DIYers.
  • They are fans of outdoor activities and travel.

WAYS TO REACH

As the majority of this segment lies within GenX, the following statistics apply to Easy Accessors in terms of marketing engagement:
  • Approximately 75% watch YouTube videos which relate to past events or people.
  • 68% connect with their kids and keep up with both world events and the trends that are important to their children by watching online content.
  • 73% use online content to teach themselves to do a DIY project.
  • 59% of women in general (and thus an extension to the average Easy Accessor between 35 and 45) are responsive to shopping offers sent by major retailers to their mobile phones.
  • 43% would respond to shopping offers sent by restaurants and 29% to offers for entertainment offers like movies, festivals, concerts, and sporting events.
  • "Mobile gamers tend to be more receptive to advertising compared to non-gamers. Some 43% of mobile gamers say they are more likely to buy or use brands with ads they like, compared to 32% of non-gamers".

PAIN POINTS

Based upon the above data, it is safe to assume that the average Easy Accessor is a very active online consumer. Following are several common pain points experienced by online shoppers:
  • A common problem is "too many choices without any choosing support is a source of great consumer frustration". A potential solution is to have a "passionate and knowledgeable expert who helps them discover products they’ll love and offers them ways to easily and intuitively pick the product that’s right for THEM".
  • 50% of potential sales are lost because visitors to a website or online shopping cart can’t find what they are looking for.
  • "45% of US customers are likely to abandon an online purchase if they can’t find a quick answer to their question".

RESEARCH STRATEGY

To build this profile, data was collated from sources like the EEDAR Gamer Segmentation Report, the Facebook Insights Tool, research from Facebook Gaming marketing reports, and additional highlights from media and market research findings. Please note that when using the Facebook Insights tool to provide the presented psychographic data, the following segments were chosen based upon assumptions from the corresponding demographic profile: age 35-45 and interest choices of online games as well as puzzle games, card games, casino games, and classic arcade games. Some data points apply to multiple segments of the profiles within this project.
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Part
12

Transitionals (35-45) - Non-Gaming Psychographics

To build a psychographic profile which details the non-gaming habits and preferences for the average Transitional, this data follows the basic demographic profile which was built in earlier research. This typical Transitional gamer between 35 and 45 is female and prefers to play casual games which include puzzle games, card games, casino games, and classic arcade games. She is most likely college-educated, married, and has children. She is more likely to make an in-game purchase than her male counterpart.

Online Habits

  • Gamers as a whole, and as an extension Transitionals (which are likely college-educated with a higher than average income), are between 1.1 times and 1.5 times more likely to make purchases in the following categories than the general online population: entertainment, electronics, computers, smartphones, and cars.
  • 74% of gamers state that "they would pay more for top-quality media and entertainment products and services" and 85% indicate their willingness to "pay more for top quality consumer electronics products and services".
  • 73% are willing to pay more for top-quality food and beverage products and services.

Non-Gaming Websites

Data on this segment's Facebook page preferences (listed by category and page name) has been collected from the Facebook subscribers who fit the Transitional demographic profile — men and women ages 35-45, with interest in games (browser, board, card, casino, and online), college-educated, and married:
  • Water Park — Great Wolf Lodge
  • Education Website — Positive Parenting Solutions
  • Home decor — Canvas On Demand, Smallwoods, and Pier 1
  • Blogger — 100 Days of Real Food and Skinnytaste
  • Baby Goods/Kids Goods — The Elf on the Shelf, Pampers, Carter's, and Gerber
  • TV Network — Disney Junior
  • Community — Bringing Home the Browns, Crock Pot Girl, and Scary Mommy
  • News and media website — Coupon Divas
  • Health & wellness website — Cleanfoodcrush
  • Media/news company — The SpruceParents and The Penny Hoarder
  • Artist — Candace Cameron Bure and Kirk Cameron
  • Product/Service — Beachbody, The Honest Company, Crayola, and Zillow
  • Comedian — imomsohard, The Holderness Family, Heather Land - I Ain't Doin It, John Crist, and Darren Knight
  • Film — Vacation
  • Public figure — The Krazy Coupon Lady, Dave Ramsey, That's Inappropriate, Joanna Gaines, Juggling The Jenkins, Mike Rowe, Jase Robertson, and Kristina Kuzmic
  • Travel Agent — Bookvip.com
  • Shopping & retail — American Girl, Brad's Deals, Groupon, and Michael's Stores
  • TV Program — This Is Us and Counting On
  • Author — Rory Feek and Ree Drummond
  • Journalist — Dan Rather
  • Fitness Trainer — Jillian Michaels
  • Non-profit organization — Focus on the Family
  • Teen & children's website — A Mighty Girl
  • Radio Station — K-LOVE Radio
  • Musician/Band — Dave Matthews Band
  • Entertainment Website — Trending on PopCulture.com
 Analysis of these page likes provides the following assumptions of the general non-gaming preferences of the Transitional Player between the ages of 35 and 45:
  • They are likely parents with younger children
  • They are bargain-seekers
  • Have a late-90s taste in music and are likely traditional in their views on politics and social issues.

Non-Gaming Brands

Data on this segment's Facebook brand page preferences (listed by category and brand name) has been collected from the Facebook subscribers who fit the Transitional Players demographic profile — men and women ages 35-45, with interest in games (browser, board, card, casino, and online), college-educated, and married:
  • Clothing shop — LOFT and Zappos.com
  • Clothing (brand) — Lolly Wolly Doodle and Old Navy
  • Cruise line — Disney Cruise Line and Carnival Cruise Line
  • Weight loss center — WW (formerly Weight Watchers)
  • Retail company — Pottery Barn Kids, Personal Creations, The Children's Place, Babies"R"Us, Toys''R''Us, HomeGoods, Pottery Barn, Maurices, Hobby Lobby, Target, Zulily, thredUP, T.J.Maxx, Lowe's Home Improvement, Marshalls, Wayfair, and Sam's Club
  • Outdoor and sporting goods company — RTIC Outdoors and Academy Sports + Outdoors
  • Furniture Shop — IKEA
  • Supermarket/Convenience store — ALDI USA
  • Food and drink company — Keurig
  • Specialist Food Shop — Whole Foods Market
  • Rental shop — Redbox
  • Health/Beauty — Dollar Shave Club
  • Company — Stitch Fix, Shutterfly, and Box Tops for Education
  • Shoes — DSW Designer Shoe Warehouse
  • Cafe — Panera Bread
  • Travel company — Southwest Airlines
Analysis of these brand likes provides the following assumptions of the general non-gaming brand preferences of the Transitional Player between the ages of 35 and 45:
  • They are health and fitness conscious.
  • This segment is willing and able to pay for quality but likes a bargain.
  • They are likely weekend DIYers.
  • They are fans of outdoor activities and travel.

Ways To Reach

As the majority of this segment lies within GenX, the following statistics apply to Transitional Players in terms of marketing engagement:
  • Approximately 75% watch YouTube videos which relate to past events or people.
  • 68% connect with their kids and keep up with both world events and the trends that are important to their children by watching online content.
  • 73% use online content to teach themselves to do a DIY project.
  •   59% of women in general (and thus an extension to the average Transitional between 35 and 45) are responsive to shopping offers sent by major retailers to their mobile phones.
  •   43% would respond to shopping offers sent by restaurants and 29% to offers for entertainment offers like movies, festivals, concerts, and sporting events.
  • "Mobile gamers tend to be more receptive to advertising compared to non-gamers. Some 43% of mobile gamers say they are more likely to buy or use brands with ads they like, compared to 32% of non-gamers".

Pain Points

Based upon the above data, it is safe to assume that the average Transitional Player is a very active online consumer. Following are several common pain points experienced by online shoppers:
  • A common problem is "too many choices without any choosing support is a source of great consumer frustration". A potential solution is to have a "passionate and knowledgeable expert who helps them discover products they’ll love and offers them ways to easily and intuitively pick the product that’s right for THEM".
  • 50% of potential sales are lost because visitors to a website or online shopping cart can’t find what they are looking for.
  • 45% of US customers are likely to abandon an online purchase if they can’t find a quick answer to their question.

RESEARCH STRATEGY

To build this profile, data was collated from sources like the EEDAR Gamer Segmentation Report, the Facebook Insights Tool, research from Facebook Gaming marketing reports, and additional highlights from media and market research findings. Please note that when using the Facebook Insights tool to provide the presented psychographic data, the following segments were chosen based upon assumptions from the corresponding demographic profile: age 35-45 and interest choices of board games, browser games, card games, casino games, and online games. Some data points apply to multiple segments of the profiles within this project.
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Part
13

Incidental Players (60+) - Gaming Psychographics

To build a psychographic profile for the average Incidental Player over the age of 60, this data follows the basic demographic profile which was built in earlier research. This typical Incidental Player over the age of 60 is either female or male and prefers to play on his/her smartphone. They are most likely college-educated, married, and have children. Females are more likely to make an in-game purchase than their male counterpart.

GAMEPLAY HABITS

Given that the average Incidental Player over the age of 60 is likely college educated and college-educated gamers are three times more likely to make in-app purchases, it can be inferred that they are what an Accenture study defines as a high-paying mobile gamers. The following in-game habits apply to this segment:
  • They are "1.8 times more likely than the general mobile gaming population to say that the ability to play with friends is influential when deciding which games to play".
  • With regard to in-game purchases, "52% of this segment will purchase new resources, tools and weapons; 41% purchase limited-edition gameplay features; 37% purchase extra lives, 36% customize their avatar; and 27% shorten waiting time or advance faster".
  • These players are "1.9 times more likely to make in-game purchases to win against their friends; 1.5 times more likely to make in-game purchases to make the game exciting again; and 1.3 times more likely to make in-game purchases to stay competitive against other players".
  • Surprisingly, based on the above, "only 21% of paying mobile gamers say that they make in-game purchases to eliminate ads altogether".
Additional habits and preferences:
  •  78% of mobile gamers are Android users thus it can be inferred this overwhelming majority would carry over to this segment, making Android the preferred device of the Incidental Players.
  • 56.8% of all gamers have admitted that they had skipped sleep in order to keep playing a video game, logically it can be assumed that 14.8% (.568 x .26) of those are Incidental Players.
  • Data from Statista (originally published in 2016 but updated in 2019) states that 77% of gamers prefer to play alone, logically it can be assumed that 20% (.77 x .26) of those are Incidental Players.

GAMING/TECH RELATED WEBSITES

  •  54% of mobile gamers discover new mobile games on the Facebook family of apps. It can be reasonably assumed based on data in the demographics report, 14% (.54 x .26) of these fall into the Incidental Player category.
  • 53% of mobile gamers do little or no research before choosing a new game to download, "if a mobile game looks interesting, they just try it". It can be reasonably assumed based on data in the demographics report, 13.8% (.53 x .26) of these fall into the Incidental Player category.
  • 47.2% of US gamers "will not continue to make purchases or play games on a website that has previously suffered a security breach" and only 16.6% state "they would continue to do business with a website after it has been hacked". Logically it can be assumed that of these 12.2% (.472 x .26) and 4.3% (.166 x .26) respectively are Incidental Players.
  • 85% of gamers download free games multiple times each year while only 55% admit to regularly paying to download games. Logically, it can be assumed that 22.1% (.85 x .26) and 14.3% (.55 x .26) are Incidental Players.

GAMING/TECH BRANDS

According to Facebook Insights, the following applies to the 1 to 1.5 million Facebook subscribers who fit into the Incidental Player segment:
  • The most popular game app page visited is no listed within the top 100 pages visited by this demographic.
  • The top three entertainment pages visited are: Trending on PopCulture.com, I Love Country Music, and PCH Publishers Clearing House.
  • The most popular blogger page visited is Yes I'm Right.
  • The most popular news/media pages visited are: Political Dig, Bipartisan Report, Your NationLife, ZetteHeadline, and PoliticsMaster.
Additional insights:

WAYS TO REACH

  • Incidental Players on Facebook "follow or like specific mobile games pages, follow or like mobile game brands, and engage with posts from friends about mobile games" and use Facebook Messenger to "chat with friends about mobile games, give friends mobile game recommendations, and ask for mobile game recommendations."
  • Incidental Players on Instagram "follow or like mobile game brands, follow or like specific mobile games, and follow or like gamers and influencers". However, only 1% of Incidental Players over the age of 60 have an Instagram, Facebook is the preferred social media platform for these gamers.
  • Of the estimated 1-1.5 million Incidental Players on Facebook, they are likely to comment on 23 pages, like 24 posts from pages they follow, share 5 posts from pages they follow, redeem 1 promotion, and click on 31 ads each month.
  • 48% of mobile gamers watch more than five hours of television a week. This suggests that they may be most influenced by television commercials and product placement in TV shows.

PAIN POINTS IN GAMING

  • As the majority of the Incidental Players over the age of 60 play games on their smart phones, pain points in mobile game play are germane to this segment. The following friction points (activity that influences or causes a gamer to abandon the download, purchase or play stages of their journey), identified by Facebook IQ and GfK, apply to this segment and can be categorized into three stages — discovery, install and post-install:
  • 84% of gamers (and as such approximately 21% are classified as Incidental Players) have experienced at least one friction point at the discovery stage.
  •   90% overall have experienced at least one friction point during the install process and 98% have experienced a friction point post-install.
  • At the discovery phase, the following are the top five friction points: ad is of poor quality and/or poor look and feel of ad, an ad leads to the wrong page, irrelevant ads or offers, inability to skip the ad, and not understanding the content of the game from the ad.
  • During the install phase, the following are the top five friction points: downloading of the app took too long, the game did not look easy to play on mobile device, request for access to friend list via social media, slow data connection, and having to wait for Wi-Fi access.
  • The most common friction points post-install are ad-experience related and are: not being able to skip the ad, the ad leads to wrong page, and poor quality/look and feel of ad.

RESEARCH STRATEGY

To build this profile, data was collated from sources like the EEDAR Gamer Segmentation Report, the Facebook Insights Tool, research from Facebook Gaming marketing reports, and additional highlights from media and market research findings. Please note that when using the Facebook Insights tool to provide the presented psychographic data, the following segments were chosen based upon assumptions from the corresponding demographic profile: aged over 60 and interest choices of board games, browser games, card games, casino games, and online games. Some data points apply to multiple segments of the profiles within this project.
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Part
14

Daily Dabblers (60+) - Gaming Psychographics

To build a psychographic profile which details the non-gaming habits and preferences for the average Daily Dabblers, this data follows the basic demographic profile which was built in earlier research. This typical Daily Dabbler gamer is age 60 and over, female and prefers to play on her smartphone. She is most likely college-educated, married, and has children.

ONLINE HABITS

  • Gamers are more likely to have a creative hobby (56%), play an instrument (32%), and more likely to be civic and vote (59%).
  • 82% of gamers are considering family a top priority (compared to 68% of the non-gaming population), feel more positive about their aspirations (67% compared to 42% of the non-gaming population), and want to positively impact society (61% compared to 35% of the non-gaming population).
  • Women are more likely to make mobile purchases (79%).

NON-GAMING WEBSITES

Data on this segment's Facebook page preferences (listed by category and page name) has been collected from the Facebook subscribers who fit the Daily Dabblers demographic profile — men and women over the age of 60, with interest in games (browser, board, card, casino, and online), college-educated, and married:
  • Sports — SilverSneakers
  • Interest — Poll Hype, The Grandma's Club, AWM America, USA Patriots for Donald Trump
  • Community organization — Fed-Up Americans, AARP
  • Loan service — Low VA Rates
  • Political organization — Fight Trump, Anti-Trump Army, OpsLens
  • Cause — The Committee to Defend the President, StandUnited.org
  • Travel company — Viking, Holland America Line
  • News and media website — Political Dig, Bipartisan Report, Your Nation, LifeZette, Headline Politics
  • History Museum — Old Photo Archive
  • Media/news company — Greenville Gazettem Washington Press, Conservative Reporter, Conservative Tradition, The Daily Headline, The Conservative Republic, Newsiosity, The Angry Patriot, American Action News, America Now
  • Hospital — Cleveland Clinic
  • Newspaper — Patriots United
  • Clothing (brand) — Chico's
  • Entertainment Website — AmoMama.com
  • Fan Page — We Love President Donald J. Trump
  • TV Network — Insp
  • Financial consultant — Conservative Post
 Analysis of these page likes provides the following assumptions of the general non-gaming preferences of the Daily Dabblers over the age of 60:
  • Their interests are mainly political, and lean heavily Right-wing.
  • The interests are usually quite convenience-based, including medical (hospitals) and financial (loans).

NON-GAMING BRANDS

Data on this segment's Facebook brand page preferences (listed by category and brand name) has been collected from the Facebook subscribers who fit the Daily Dabblers demographic profile — men and women over the age of 60, with interest in games (browser, board, card, casino, and online), college-educated, and married:
  • Non-profit organization: No Labels, National Pro-Life Alliance, Alliance Defending Freedom, ACLJ
  • Political organization: OpsLens, NRSC, Heritage Action for America, Conservative World Daily
  • Media brands: Greenville Gazette, LifeZette, Washington Press
  • Retail brands: Chico's
  • Sports brands: Vikings, Patriots
  • Outdoor and sporting goods company: RTIC Outdoors and Academy Sports + Outdoors
  • Travel company: Southwest Airlines
  • Community: Conservatives Today, FutureinAmerica, Liberty Upheld, Stop Amnesty
Analysis of these brand likes provides the following assumptions of the general non-gaming brand preferences of the Daily Dabblers over the age of 60:
  • This segment is willing and able to pay for quality but likes a bargain.
  • They are very interested in tradition and preserving the traditional values.
  • Their media interests are focused on local coverage in politics, charity, and other non-profit areas.

WAYS TO REACH

As the majority of this segment lies within Boomers, the following statistics apply to Daily Dabblers in terms of marketing engagement:
  • The generation as a whole is used to working hard, and they value hard work. After reaching retirement age, they are seeking to enjoy a higher quality of life.
  • 59% of women in general (and thus an extension to the average Easy Accessor over the age of 60) are responsive to shopping offers sent by major retailers to their mobile phones.
  • They are specifically interested in medical aids such as medical alert system and hearing aids, as well as assisted living opportunities.
  • Baby boomers spend on average 27 hours per week online, compared to 25 hours per week registered for those who are between 16 and 34.
  • Facebook is by far the most popular social media site for this generation. Additionally, baby boomers are the most likely to take action based on what they read on social media.

PAIN POINTS

Based upon the above data, it is safe to assume that the average Daily Dabblers is a very active online consumer. Following are several common pain points experienced by online shoppers:
  • Friendly formats such as larger fonts on retail websites, easier navigation, help buttons, and so on, are largely sought out by the generation of Daily Dabblers.
  • While hesitant to try out new technologies, if there is enough assistance provided by online retail shops, the Daily Dabblers will be willing to try out new things.
  • They are looking for shopping deals as they "transition to fixed incomes, meaning they’re more likely to value product discounts, rebates, or free shipping than their millennial counterparts."

RESEARCH STRATEGY

To build this profile, data was collated from sources like the EEDAR Gamer Segmentation Report, the Facebook Insights Tool, research from Facebook Gaming marketing reports, and additional highlights from media and market research findings. Please note that when using the Facebook Insights tool to provide the presented psychographic data, the following segments were chosen based upon assumptions from the corresponding demographic profile: age 60 and over, and interest choices of board games, browser games, card games, casino games, and online games. Some data points apply to multiple segments of the profiles within this project.
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Part
15

Easy Accessors (60+) - Gaming Psychographics

To build a psychographic profile for the average Easy Accessor 60+ years old, this data follows the basic demographic profile which was built in earlier research. This typical Easy Accessor is female and prefers to play on her smartphone. She is most likely in a lower-income bracket, is or was married, and has children.

GAMEPLAY HABITS

  • Among mobile gamers, 37% are men. Thus, it can be reasonably assumed that 1.45% of mobile gamers are male Easy Accessors in the 65+ age bracket (37 x 0.23 (because 23% of mobile gamers are 65+ years old) x 0.17 (because approximately 17% of U.S. gamers are Easy Accessors)). We used data regarding mobile gamers 65+ years old because that was the closest age range that we could find to such 60+ year-olds in the U.S.
  • Among mobile gamers, 63% (100% — 37% (men)) are women. Thus, it can be reasonably assumed that 2.46% of mobile gamers are female Easy Accessors in this age bracket (63 x 0.23 x 0.17).
  • Research found that "47% of male mobile gamers play a mobile game" on a daily basis. We can assume that 1.84% of those gamers are Easy Accessors in this age bracket (47 x 0.23 x 0.17).
  • The percentage "of active male gamers [who] use mobile" is 45%. Thus, we can assume that 1.76% of those gamers are Easy Accessors in this age bracket (45 x 0.23 x 0.17).
  • The percentage "of active female gamers [who] use mobile" is 55%. We can reasonably assume that 2.15% of those gamers are Easy Accessors in this age bracket (55 x 0.23 x 0.17).
  • Two-thirds (66%) of people in both the bottom 25% and top 25% income brackets are mobile gamers. Thus, it can be reasonably assumed that 2.58% of people in each of the aforementioned income brackets are Easy Accessors in this age bracket (66 x 0.23 x 0.17).
  • Among people in the middle income bracket, 67% are mobile gamers. Based on that information, we can assume that 2.62% of people in the middle income bracket are Easy Accessors in this age group (67 x 0.23 x 0.17).
  • Among mobile gamers, 56% play such games over ten times per week. Thus, it can be reasonably assumed that 2.19% of those gamers are Easy Accessors in this age bracket (56 x 0.23 x 0.17).
  • Among mobile gamers, 19% play such games between six and nine times per week. From that information, we can assume that 0.74% of those gamers are Easy Accessors in this age bracket (19 x 0.23 x 0.17).
  • GAMING/TECH-RELATED WEBSITES

    • Fifty-four percent of mobile gamers "discover new mobile games on the Facebook family of apps." Thus, it can be reasonably assumed that Easy Accessors in this age bracket account for 2.11% of those gamers (54 x 0.23 x 0.17).
    • Fifty-three percent of mobile gamers "do little or no research before choosing a new game to download" and thus "if a mobile game looks interesting, they just try it." From that information, we can assume that 2.07% of those gamers are Easy Accessors in this age bracket (53 x 0.23 x 0.17).
    • The percentage "of gamers [who] download free games multiple times each year" is 85%. We can reasonably assume that Easy Accessors in this age bracket account for 3.32% of those gamers (85 x 0.23 x 0.17).
    • The percentage of gamers who "regularly pay[] to download games" is 55%. Based upon that data, it can be assumed that 2.15% of those gamers are Easy Accessors in this age bracket (55 x 0.23 x 0.17).

    GAMING/TECH BRANDS

    1. Operating System

    • The percentage of mobile gamers who use Android is 78%. Thus, we can reasonably assume that Easy Accessors in this age bracket account for 3.05% of those gamers (78 x 0.23 x 0.17).

    2. Game Publishers

    A. Playrix

    • Among those who play mobile games on a heavy basis (61+ hours/month on average), 54% play games published by Playrix. From that data, we can assume that 2.11% of those mobile gamers are Easy Accessors in this age group (54 x 0.23 x 0.17).
    • Among those who play mobile games on a medium basis (8+ hours/month average), 38% play games published by Playrix. Thus, we can reasonably assume that Easy Accessors in this age group account for 1.49% of those mobile gamers (38 x 0.23 x 0.17).
    • Among those who play mobile games on a light basis (18 minutes each month), 8% play games published by Playrix. Based on that data, we assumed that Easy Accessors in this age group account for 0.31% of those mobile gamers (8 x 0.23 x 0.17).

    B. Rovio

    • Among those who play mobile games on a heavy basis, 51% play games published by Rovio. Thus, it can be reasonably assumed that Easy Accessors in this age group account for 1.99% of those mobile gamers (51 x 0.23 x 0.17).
    • Among those who play mobile games on a medium basis, 51% play games published by Rovio. From that data, we can assume that 1.99% of those mobile gamers are Easy Accessors in this age bracket (51 x 0.23 x 0.17).
    • Among those who play mobile games on a light basis, 4% play games published by Rovio. We can assume from that information that Easy Accessors in this age group account for 0.16% of those mobile gamers (4 x 0.23 x 0.17).

    C. Scopely

    • Among those who play mobile games on a heavy basis, 50% play games published by Scopely. Thus, it can be reasonably assumed that Easy Accessors in this age group account for 1.96% of those mobile gamers (50 x 0.23 x 0.17).
    • Among those who play mobile games on a medium basis, 45% play games published by Scopely. Based on that data, we can reasonably assume that 1.76% of those mobile gamers are Easy Accessors in this age bracket (45 x 0.23 x 0.17).
    • Among those who play mobile games on a light basis, 4% play games published by Scopely. We can assume that Easy Accessors in this age group account for 0.16% of those mobile gamers (4 x 0.23 x 0.17).

    D. Activision

    • Among those who play mobile games on a heavy basis, 43% play games published by Activision. Thus, it can be reasonably assumed that Easy Accessors in this age group account for 1.68% of those mobile gamers (43 x 0.23 x 0.17).
    • Among those who play mobile games on a medium basis, 48% play games published by Activision. From that data, we assumed that 1.88% of those mobile gamers are Easy Accessors in this age bracket (48 x 0.23 x 0.17).
    • Among those who play mobile games on a light basis, 9% play games published by Activision. We can reasonably assume from that data that Easy Accessors in this age group account for 0.35% of those mobile gamers (9 x 0.23 x 0.17).

    E. Supercell

    • Among those who play mobile games on a heavy basis, 40% play games published by Supercell. Thus, it can be reasonably assumed that Easy Accessors in this age group account for 1.56% of those mobile gamers (40 x 0.23 x 0.17).
    • Among those who play mobile games on a medium basis, 51% play games published by Supercell. Based on that data, we can assume that 1.99% of those mobile gamers are Easy Accessors in this age bracket (51 x 0.23 x 0.17).
    • Among those who play mobile games on a light basis, 9% play games published by Supercell. We can assume from that data that Easy Accessors in this age group account for 0.35% of those mobile gamers (9 x 0.23 x 0.17).

    F. Nintendo

    • Among those who play mobile games on a heavy basis, 32% play games published by Nintendo. Thus, it can be reasonably assumed that Easy Accessors in this age group account for 1.25% of those mobile gamers (32 x 0.23 x 0.17).
    • Among those who play mobile games on a medium basis, 51% play games published by Nintendo. From that data, we can assume that 1.99% of those mobile gamers are Easy Accessors in this age group (51 x 0.23 x 0.17).
    • Among those who play mobile games on a light basis, 17% play games published by Nintendo. We reasonably assumed that Easy Accessors in this age group account for 0.66% of those mobile gamers (17 x 0.23 x 0.17).

    WAYS TO REACH

    • Over half (54%) of mobile gamers "discover new mobile games on the Facebook family of apps." We can reasonably assume from that data that 2.11% of those mobile gamers are Easy Accessors in this age group (54 x 0.23 x 0.17).
    • Over two-thirds (67%) of paying mobile gamers "discover new mobile games on the Facebook family of apps." Thus, we can assume that 2.62% of those mobile gamers are Easy Accessors in this age group (67 x 0.23 x 0.17).
    • Just over one-fourth (27%) of mobile gamers "are influenced by the ability to play with friends when deciding which mobile game to try." Based on that data, we can reasonably assume that Easy Accessors in this age bracket account for 1.06% of those mobile gamers (27 x 0.23 x 0.17).
    • More than one-third (39%) of paying mobile gamers "are influenced by the ability to play with friends when deciding which mobile game to try." From that information, we can assume that 1.52% of those mobile gamers are Easy Accessors in this age group (39 x 0.23 x 0.17).
    • Nearly three-fourths (74%) of high-paying mobile gamers "discover new mobile games on the Facebook family of apps." We can reasonably assume from that data that 2.89% of those mobile gamers are Easy Accessors in this age group (74 x 0.23 x 0.17).
    • Almost half (48%) of high-paying mobile gamers "are influenced by the ability to play with friends when deciding which mobile game to try." Thus, we can assume that Easy Accessors in this age bracket account for 1.88% of those mobile gamers (48 x 0.23 x 0.17).

    PAIN POINTS IN GAMING

    • Among mobile gamers, 84% "have experienced one or more friction points" during the discovery phase. We can reasonably assume that 3.28% of those mobile gamers are Easy Accessors in this age group (84 x 0.23 x 0.17).
    • Among mobile gamers, 90% "have experienced one or more friction points" during the installation phase. Based on that data, we assumed that Easy Accessors in this age bracket account for 3.52% of those mobile gamers (90 x 0.23 x 0.17).
    • Among mobile gamers, 96% "have experienced one or more friction points" during the post-installation phase. We can reasonably assume from that data that 3.75% of those mobile gamers are Easy Accessors in this age group (96 x 0.23 x 0.17).
    • Over half (56%) of mobile gamers "stopped playing a mobile game after one time because it wasn't entertaining." From that information, we can assume that 2.19% of those mobile gamers are Easy Accessors in this age group (56 x 0.23 x 0.17).

RESEARCH STRATEGY

To build this profile, data was collated from sources like the EEDAR Gamer Segmentation Report, the Facebook Insights Tool, research from Facebook Gaming marketing reports, and additional highlights from media and market research findings. Please note that when using the Facebook Insights tool to provide the presented psychographic data, the following segments were chosen based upon assumptions from the corresponding demographic profile: Ages 60+ and interest choices of board games, browser games, card games, casino games, and online games. The reason our data applies to the 65+ age range (and doesn't include ages 60-64) is because that was the most-closely aligned age range we could find for information about mobile gamers in the U.S. Some data points apply to multiple segments of the profiles within this project. For all calculations that resulted in values with decimal points, those resulting values were rounded to the nearest hundredth.
Part
16
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Part
16

Transitionals (60+) - Gaming Psychographics

To build a psychographic profile for the average Transitional 60+ years old, this data follows the basic demographic profile which was built in earlier research. Transitionals are avid gamers who are in the process of transitioning from PC and console gaming to mobile gaming due to changes in their lives, such as raising a family. However, Transitionals are still likely to game on PC and/or console when circumstances allow.

Gameplay Habits

1. By Gender

  • Among mobile gamers, 37% are men. Thus, we can reasonably estimate that 0.94% of mobile gamers are male Transitionals in the 60+ age bracket (37 x 0.23 (because 23% of mobile gamers are 65+ years old) x 0.11 (because approximately 11% of U.S. gamers are Transitionals)).
  • The reason our data applies to 65+ year-olds (and thus doesn't include 60-64 year-olds) is because that was the most-closely aligned age range that we could find regarding information about mobile gamers in the U.S.
  • Among mobile gamers, 63% (100% — 37% (men)) are women. Thus, it can be reasonably estimated that 1.59% of mobile gamers are female Transitionals in this age bracket (63 x 0.23 x 0.11).
  • Research found that "47% of male mobile gamers play a mobile game" on a daily basis. We can estimate that 1.19% of those gamers are Transitionals in this age bracket (47 x 0.23 x 0.11).
  • The percentage "of active male gamers [who] use mobile" is 45%. Thus, we can estimate that 1.14% of those gamers are Transitionals in this age bracket (45 x 0.23 x 0.11).
  • The percentage "of active female gamers [who] use mobile" is 55%. We can reasonably estimate that 1.39% of those gamers are Transitionals in this age bracket (55 x 0.23 x 0.11).
  • The gender breakdown of PC gamers is heavily skewed towards men, as 64% of such gamers are men, while 36% are women. Based on that data, we estimate that Transitionals in this age group account for 1.62% of those male gamers (64 x 0.23 x 0.11) and 0.91% of those female gamers (36 x 0.23 x 0.11).
  • The gender breakdown of console gamers is also skewed towards men, as 60% of such gamers are men, while 40% are women. Thus, we can reasonably estimate that 1.52% of those male gamers (60 x 0.23 x 0.11) and 1.01% of those female gamers (40 x 0.23 x 0.11) are Transitionals in this age group.

2. By Income

  • Two-thirds (66%) of people in both the bottom 25% and top 25% income brackets are mobile gamers. Thus, it can be reasonably estimated that 1.67% of people in each of the aforementioned income brackets are Transitionals in this age group (66 x 0.23 x 0.11).
  • Among people in the middle income bracket, 67% are mobile gamers. Based on that information, we can estimate that 1.7% of people in the middle income bracket are Transitionals in this age group (67 x 0.23 x 0.11).

3. By Time/Frequency

  • Among mobile gamers, 56% play such games over ten times per week. Thus, it can be reasonably estimated that 1.42% of those gamers are Transitionals in this age bracket (56 x 0.23 x 0.11).
  • Among mobile gamers, 19% play such games between six and nine times per week. From that information, we can estimate that 0.48% of those gamers are Transitionals in this age bracket (19 x 0.23 x 0.11).
  • Forty-seven percent of men reported gaming either often or sometimes. We reasonably estimated that Transitionals in this age group account for 1.19% of those gamers (47 x 0.23 x 0.11).
  • Forty percent of women reported gaming either often or sometimes. Based on that data, we can estimate that 1.01% of those gamers are Transitionals in this age group (40 x 0.23 x 0.11).
  • Among PC Gamers in the U.S., 26% spend between one and two hours using the PC per sitting. Thus, it can be reasonably estimated that 0.66% of those gamers are Transitionals in this age bracket (26 x 0.23 x 0.11).
  • Just over one-fourth of gamers (26.8%) play video games for seven or more hours each week. We can estimate from that data that Transitionals in this age group account for 0.68% of those gamers (26.8 x 0.23 x 0.11).

4. By Device (and Irrespective of Gender)

  • The percentage of gamers who play games on all three platforms (PC, console, and phone) is 27%. Based on that data, it's reasonable to estimate that 0.68% of those gamers are Transitionals in this age group (27 x 0.23 x 0.11).
  • The percentage of gamers who play games on a phone plus at least one other device is 59%. Thus, we can estimate that Transitionals in this age group account for 1.49% of those gamers (59 x 0.23 x 0.11).

GAMING/TECH-RELATED WEBSITES

  • Fifty-three percent of mobile gamers "do little or no research before choosing a new game to download" and thus "if a mobile game looks interesting, they just try it." From that information, we can estimate that 1.34% of those gamers are Transitionals in this age bracket (53 x 0.23 x 0.11).
  • The percentage "of gamers [who] download free games multiple times each year" is 85%. We can reasonably estimate that Transitionals in this age bracket account for 2.15% of those gamers (85 x 0.23 x 0.11).
  • The percentage of gamers who "regularly pay[] to download games" is 55%. Based upon that data, it can be estimated that 1.39% of those gamers are Transitionals in this age bracket (55 x 0.23 x 0.11).
  • U.S. gamers who pay for mobile games "are 1.6x more likely to find new games using Instagram than mobile gamers in general."
  • U.S. gamers who are categorized as "high-paying mobile gamers are more than twice as likely to discover a game on Instagram or Messenger than U.S. mobile gamers in general."

GAMING/TECH BRANDS

1. Operating System

  • The percentage of mobile gamers who use Android is 78%. Thus, we can reasonably estimate that Transitionals in this age bracket account for 1.97% of those gamers (78 x 0.23 x 0.11).

2. Game Publishers

A. Playrix

  • Among those who play mobile games on a heavy basis (61+ hours/month on average), 54% play games published by Playrix. From that data, we can estimate that 1.37% of those mobile gamers are Transitionals in this age group (54 x 0.23 x 0.11).
  • Among those who play mobile games on a medium basis (8+ hours/month average), 38% play games published by Playrix. Thus, we can reasonably estimate that Transitionals in this age group account for 0.96% of those mobile gamers (38 x 0.23 x 0.11).
  • We didn't include gamers who play on a light basis for this publisher or any other publisher because Transitionals constitute "invested adult gamers" which is the opposite of the casual gamer.
  • All data included in this Game Publishers section is also included in this Google Doc.

B. Rovio

  • Among those who play mobile games on a heavy basis, 51% play games published by Rovio. Thus, it can be reasonably estimated that Transitionals in this age group account for 1.29% of those mobile gamers (51 x 0.23 x 0.11).
  • Among those who play mobile games on a medium basis, 51% play games published by Rovio. From that data, we can estimate that 1.29% of those mobile gamers are Transitionals in this age bracket (51 x 0.23 x 0.11).

C. Scopely

  • Among those who play mobile games on a heavy basis, 50% play games published by Scopely. Thus, it can be reasonably estimated that Transitionals in this age group account for 1.27% of those mobile gamers (50 x 0.23 x 0.11).
  • Among those who play mobile games on a medium basis, 45% play games published by Scopely. Based on that data, we can reasonably estimate that 1.14% of those mobile gamers are Transitionals in this age bracket (45 x 0.23 x 0.11).

D. Activision

  • Among those who play mobile games on a heavy basis, 43% play games published by Activision. Thus, it can be reasonably estimated that Transitionals in this age group account for 1.09% of those mobile gamers (43 x 0.23 x 0.11).
  • Among those who play mobile games on a medium basis, 48% play games published by Activision. From that data, we estimated that 1.21% of those mobile gamers are Transitionals in this age bracket (48 x 0.23 x 0.11).

E. Supercell

  • Among those who play mobile games on a heavy basis, 40% play games published by Supercell. Thus, it can be reasonably estimated that Transitionals in this age group account for 1.01% of those mobile gamers (40 x 0.23 x 0.11).
  • Among those who play mobile games on a medium basis, 51% play games published by Supercell. Based on that data, we can estimate that 1.29% of those mobile gamers are Transitionals in this age bracket (51 x 0.23 x 0.11).

F. Nintendo

  • Among those who play mobile games on a heavy basis, 32% play games published by Nintendo. Thus, it can be reasonably estimated that Transitionals in this age group account for 0.81% of those mobile gamers (32 x 0.23 x 0.11).
  • Among those who play mobile games on a medium basis, 51% play games published by Nintendo. From that data, we can estimate that 1.29% of those mobile gamers are Transitionals in this age group (51 x 0.23 x 0.11).

WAYS TO REACH

  • Over half (54%) of mobile gamers "discover new mobile games on the Facebook family of apps." We can reasonably estimate from that data that 1.37% of those mobile gamers are Transitionals in this age group (54 x 0.23 x 0.11).
  • Over two-thirds (67%) of paying mobile gamers "discover new mobile games on the Facebook family of apps." Thus, we can estimate that 1.7% of those mobile gamers are Transitionals in this age group (67 x 0.23 x 0.11).
  • Just over one-fourth (27%) of mobile gamers "are influenced by the ability to play with friends when deciding which mobile game to try." Based on that data, we can reasonably estimate that Transitionals in this age bracket account for 0.68% of those mobile gamers (27 x 0.23 x 0.11).
  • More than one-third (39%) of paying mobile gamers "are influenced by the ability to play with friends when deciding which mobile game to try." From that information, we can estimate that 0.99% of those mobile gamers are Transitionals in this age group (39 x 0.23 x 0.11).
  • Nearly three-fourths (74%) of high-paying mobile gamers "discover new mobile games on the Facebook family of apps." We can reasonably estimate from that data that 1.87% of those mobile gamers are Transitionals in this age group (74 x 0.23 x 0.11).
  • Almost half (48%) of high-paying mobile gamers "are influenced by the ability to play with friends when deciding which mobile game to try." Thus, we can estimate that Transitionals in this age bracket account for 1.21% of those mobile gamers (48 x 0.23 x 0.11).

PAIN POINTS IN GAMING

  • A survey of U.S. gamers found that "the most frustrating part of downloading video games" is download time, as 39.4% cited that as their top frustration. Based on that data, it's reasonable to estimate that 1% of those gamers are Transitionals in this age group (39.4 x 0.23 x 0.11).
  • That same survey found that the second-most-commonly-cited frustration with video game downloads is downloads not working, as 25.5% of gamers said that is their top frustration. We estimate that Transitionals in this age group account for 0.65% of those gamers (25.5 x 0.23 x 0.11).
  • The survey also revealed that the third-most-commonly-cited frustration with video game downloads is an interruption that occurs during the download process, which thus requires re-starting the download, as 17.6% of gamers cited that as their top frustration. Thus, we can estimate that 0.45% of those gamers are Transitionals in this age bracket (17.6 x 0.23 x 0.11).
  • Among mobile gamers, 84% "have experienced one or more friction points" during the discovery phase. We can reasonably estimate that 2.13% of those mobile gamers are Transitionals in this age group (84 x 0.23 x 0.11).
  • Among mobile gamers, 90% "have experienced one or more friction points" during the installation phase. Based on that data, we estimated that Transitionals in this age bracket account for 2.28% of those mobile gamers (90 x 0.23 x 0.11).
  • Among mobile gamers, 96% "have experienced one or more friction points" during the post-installation phase. We can reasonably estimate from that data that 2.43% of those mobile gamers are Transitionals in this age group (96 x 0.23 x 0.11).
  • Over half (56%) of mobile gamers "stopped playing a mobile game after one time because it wasn't entertaining." From that information, we can estimate that 1.42% of those mobile gamers are Transitionals in this age group (56 x 0.23 x 0.11).

Research Strategy

To build this profile, data was collated from sources like the EEDAR Gamer Segmentation Report, the Facebook Insights Tool, research from Facebook Gaming marketing reports, and additional highlights from media and market research findings. Please note that when using the Facebook Insights tool to provide the presented psychographic data, the following segments were chosen based upon assumptions from the corresponding demographic profile: 60+ years-old and interest choices of board games, browser games, card games, casino games, and online games.

A lot of our data is focused on mobile gamers because Transitionals are defined as "invested adult gamers whose stage of life means shifting from HD-centric gaming to more flexible mobile gaming." However, since Transitionals are in flux between HD and mobile gaming, they presumably still play PC and console games, though likely on a less-frequent basis. Accordingly, we also included some data about PC and console gamers as it relates to Transitionals. Some data points apply to multiple segments of the profiles within this project. For all calculations that resulted in values with decimal points, those resulting values were rounded to the nearest hundredth.
Part
17
of 40
Part
17

Incidental Players (45-60) - Gaming Psychographics

To build a psychographic profile for the average Incidental Player, this data follows the basic demographic profile which was built in earlier research. This typical Incidental Player between 45 and 60 is female and prefers to play on her smartphone. She is most likely college-educated, married, and has children. She is more likely to make an in-game purchase than her male counterpart.

GAMEPLAY HABITS

Given that the average 45-60 year old Incidental Player is likely college educated and college-educated gamers are three times more likely to make in-app purchases, it can be inferred that they are what an Accenture study defines as a high-paying mobile gamers. The following in-game habits apply to this segment:
  • They are "1.8 times more likely than the general mobile gaming population to say that the ability to play with friends is influential when deciding which games to play".
  • With regard to in-game purchases, "52% of this segment will purchase new resources, tools and weapons; 41% purchase limited-edition gameplay features; 37% purchase extra lives, 36% customize their avatar; and 27% shorten waiting time or advance faster".
  • These players are "1.9 times more likely to make in-game purchases to win against their friends; 1.5 times more likely to make in-game purchases to make the game exciting again; and 1.3 times more likely to make in-game purchases to stay competitive against other players".
  • Surprisingly, based on the above, "only 21% of paying mobile gamers say that they make in-game purchases to eliminate ads altogether".
Additional habits and preferences:
  • 78% of mobile gamers are Android users thus it can be inferred this overwhelming majority would carry over to this segment, making Android the preferred device of the Incidental Players.
  • 56.8% of all gamers have admitted that they had skipped sleep in order to keep playing a video game, logically it can be assumed that 14.8% (.568 x .26) of those are Incidental Players.
  • Data from Statista (originally published in 2016 but updated in 2019) states that 77% of gamers prefer to play alone, logically it can be assumed that 20% (.77 x .26) of those are Incidental Players.

GAMING/TECH RELATED WEBSITES

  • 54% of mobile gamers discover new mobile games on the Facebook family of apps. It can be reasonably assumed based on data in the demographics report, 14% (.54 x .26) of these fall into the Incidental Player category.
  • 53% of mobile gamers do little or no research before choosing a new game to download, "if a mobile game looks interesting, they just try it". It can be reasonably assumed based on data in the demographics report, 13.8% (.53 x .26) of these fall into the Incidental Player category.
  • 47.2% of US gamers "will not continue to make purchases or play games on a website that has previously suffered a security breach" and only 16.6% state "they would continue to do business with a website after it has been hacked". Logically it can be assumed that of these 12.2% (.472 x .26) and 4.3% (.166 x .26) respectively are Incidental Players.
  • 85% of gamers download free games multiple times each year while only 55% admit to regularly paying to download games. Logically, it can be assumed that 22.1% (.85 x .26) and 14.3% (.55 x .26) are Incidental Players.

GAMING/TECH BRANDS

According to Facebook Insights, the following applies to the 20-25 thousand Facebook subscribers who fit into the Incidental Player segment:
  • The most popular game app page visited is The Price is Right.
  • The top three entertainment pages visited are: Trending on PopCulture.com, I Love Country Music, and PCH Publishers Clearing House.
  • The most popular blogger page visited is I Love Being a Mom.
  • Family Feud 2 is noted as the most popular video game in this segment.
  • The most popular news/media pages visited are: JumbleJoy.com, AmoMama Nostalgia, The Inquisitr, and Crosswalk.com.

WAYS TO REACH

  • Incidental Players on Facebook "follow or like specific mobile games pages, follow or like mobile game brands, and engage with posts from friends about mobile games" and use Facebook Messenger to "chat with friends about mobile games, give friends mobile game recommendations, and ask for mobile game recommendations."
  • Incidental Players on Instagram "follow or like mobile game brands, follow or like specific mobile games, and follow or like gamers and influencers".
  • Of the estimated 20-25 thousand Incidental Players on Facebook, they are likely to comment on 37 pages, like 35 posts from pages they follow, share 11 posts from pages they follow, redeem 1 promotion, and click on 42 ads each month.

PAIN POINTS IN GAMING

As the majority of the 45-60 year old Incidental players play games on their smart phones, pain points in mobile game play are germane to this segment. The following friction points (activity that influences or causes a gamer to abandon the download, purchase or play stages of their journey), identified by Facebook IQ and GfK, apply to this segment and can be categorized into three stages — discovery, install and post-install:
  • 84% of gamers (and as such approximately 21% are classified as Incidental Players) have experienced at least one friction point at the discovery stage.
  •  90% overall have experienced at least one friction point during the install process and 98% have experienced a friction point post-install.
  • At the discovery phase, the following are the top five friction points: ad is of poor quality and/or poor look and feel of ad, an ad leads to the wrong page, irrelevant ads or offers, inability to skip the ad, and not understanding the content of the game from the ad.
  • During the install phase, the following are the top five friction points: downloading of the app took too long, the game did not look easy to play on mobile device, request for access to friend list via social media, slow data connection, and having to wait for Wi-Fi access.
  • The most common friction points post-install are ad-experience related and are: not being able to skip the ad, the ad leads to wrong page, and poor quality/look and feel of ad.

RESEARCH STRATEGY

To build this profile, data was collated from sources like the EEDAR Gamer Segmentation Report, the Facebook Insights Tool, research from Facebook Gaming marketing reports, and additional highlights from media and market research findings. Please note that when using the Facebook Insights tool to provide the presented psychographic data, the following segments were chosen based upon assumptions from the corresponding demographic profile: age 45-60 and interest choices of board games, browser games, card games, casino games, and online games. Some data points apply to multiple segments of the profiles within this project.

Part
18
of 40
Part
18

Daily Dabblers (45-60) - Gaming Psychographics

To build a psychographic profile for the average Daily Dabbler, this data follows the basic demographic profile which was built in earlier research. This typical Daily Dabbler gamer between 45 and 60 is female and prefers to play on her smartphone. She is most likely college-educated, married, and has children. She is more likely to make an in-game purchase than her male counterpart.

GAMEPLAY HABITS

Given that the average 45-60 year old Daily Dabbler is likely college educated and college-educated gamers are three times more likely to make in-app purchases, it can be inferred that they are what an Accenture study defines as a high-paying mobile gamers. The following in-game habits apply to this segment:
  • They are "1.8 times more likely than the general mobile gaming population to say that the ability to play with friends is influential when deciding which games to play".
  • With regard to in-game purchases, "52% of this segment will purchase new resources, tools and weapons; 41% purchase limited-edition gameplay features; 37% purchase extra lives, 36% customize their avatar; and 27% shorten waiting time or advance faster".
  • These players are "1.9 times more likely to make in-game purchases to win against their friends; 1.5 times more likely to make in-game purchases to make the game exciting again; and 1.3 times more likely to make in-game purchases to stay competitive against other players".
  • Surprisingly, based on the above, "only 21% of paying mobile gamers say that they make in-game purchases to eliminate ads altogether".
Additional habits and preferences:
  • 78% of mobile gamers are Android users thus it can be inferred this overwhelming majority would carry over to this segment, making Android the preferred device of the Daily Dabbler.
  • 56.8% of all gamers have admitted that they had skipped sleep in order to keep playing a video game, logically it can be assumed that 10.8% (.568 x .19) of those are Daily Dabblers.
  • Data from Statista (originally published in 2016 but updated in 2019) states that 77% of gamers prefer to play alone, logically it can be assumed that 14.6% (.77 x .19) of Daily Dabblers choose to play alone.

GAMING/TECH RELATED WEBSITES

  •  54% of mobile gamers discover new mobile games on the Facebook family of apps. It can be reasonably assumed based on data in the demographics report, 10.3% (.54 x .19) of these fall into the Daily Dabbler category.
  • 53% of mobile gamers do little or no research before choosing a new game to download, "if a mobile game looks interesting, they just try it". It can be reasonably assumed based on data in the demographics report, 10.1% (.53 x .19) of these fall into the Daily Dabbler category.
  • 47.2% of US gamers "will not continue to make purchases or play games on a website that has previously suffered a security breach" and only 16.6% state "they would continue to do business with a website after it has been hacked". Logically it can be assumed that of these 9% (.472 x .19) and 3.1% (.166 x .19) respectively are Daily Dabblers.
  • 85% of gamers download free games multiple times each year while only 55% admit to regularly paying to download games. Logically, it can be assumed that 16.1% (.85x .19) and 10.5% (.55 x .19) are Daily Dabblers.

GAMING/TECH BRANDS

According to Facebook Insights, the following applies to the 1 – 1.5 million Facebook subscribers who fit into the Daily Dabbler segment:
  • The top two entertainment pages visited are: Trending on PopCulture.com, and Women After 50.
  • Family Feud 2 is noted as the most popular video game in this segment.
  • The most popular news/media pages visited are: Coupon Divas, One Country, and Everything Inspirational.

WAYS TO REACH

  • Daily Dabblers on Facebook "follow or like specific mobile games pages, follow or like mobile game brands, and engage with posts from friends about mobile games" and use Facebook Messenger to "chat with friends about mobile games, give friends mobile game recommendations, and ask for mobile game recommendations."
  • Daily Dabblers on Instagram "follow or like mobile game brands, follow or like specific mobile games, and follow or like gamers and influencers".
  • 48% of mobile gamers watch more than five hours of television a week. This suggests that they may be most influenced by television commercials and product placement in TV shows.
  • Of the estimated 1-1.5 million Daily Dabblers on Facebook, they are likely to comment on 33 pages, like 36 posts from pages they follow, share 6 posts from pages they follow, redeem 1 promotion, and click on 37 ads each month.

PAIN POINTS IN GAMING

As the majority of the 45-60 year Daily Dabblers play games on their smart phones, pain points in mobile game play are germane to this segment. The following friction points (activity that influences or causes a gamer to abandon the download, purchase or play stages of their journey), identified by Facebook IQ and GfK, apply to this segment and can be categorized into three stages — discovery, install and post-install:
  • 84% of gamers (and as such approximately 16% are classified as Daily Dabblers) have experienced at least one friction point at the discovery stage.
  • 90% overall have experienced at least one friction point during the install process and 98% have experienced a friction point post-install.
  • At the discovery phase, the following are the top five friction points: ad is of poor quality and/or poor look and feel of ad, an ad leads to the wrong page, irrelevant ads or offers, inability to skip the ad, and not understanding the content of the game from the ad.
  • During the install phase, the following are the top five friction points: downloading of the app took too long, the game did not look easy to play on mobile device, request for access to friend list via social media, slow data connection, and having to wait for Wi-Fi access.
  • The most common friction points post-install are ad-experience related and are: not being able to skip the ad, the ad leads to wrong page, and poor quality/look and feel of ad.

RESEARCH STRATEGY

To build this profile, data was collated from sources like the EEDAR Gamer Segmentation Report, the Facebook Insights Tool, research from Facebook Gaming marketing reports, and additional highlights from media and market research findings. Please note that when using the Facebook Insights tool to provide the presented psychographic data, the following segments were chosen based upon assumptions from the corresponding demographic profile: age 45-60 and interest choices of board games, browser games, card games, casino games, and online games. Some data points apply to multiple segments of the profiles within this project.

Part
19
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Part
19

Easy Accessors (45-60) - Gaming Psychographics

To build a psychographic profile for the average Easy Accessor between the ages of 45 and 60, this data follows the basic demographic profile which was built in earlier research. This typical Easy Accessor is female and prefers to play on her smartphone. She is most likely in a lower-income bracket, is or was married, and has children.

GAMEPLAY HABITS

  • Among mobile gamers, 37% are men. Thus, it can be reasonably assumed that 0.94% of mobile gamers are male Easy Accessors in the 45-54 age bracket (37 x 0.15 (because 15% of mobile gamers are between the ages of 45 and 54) x 0.17 (because approximately 17% of U.S. gamers are Easy Accessors)). The 45-54 age range was the closest we could get to the 45-60 range for data specific to U.S. mobile gamers, which is why we used that data throughout our research.
  • Among mobile gamers, 63% (100% — 37% (men)) are women. Thus, it can be reasonably assumed that 1.61% of mobile gamers are female Easy Accessors in this age bracket (63 x 0.15 x 0.17).
  • Research found that "47% of male mobile gamers play a mobile game" on a daily basis. We can assume that 1.2% of those gamers are Easy Accessors in this age bracket (47 x 0.15 x 0.17).
  • The percentage "of active male gamers [who] use mobile" is 45%. Thus, we can assume that 1.15% of those gamers are Easy Accessors in this age bracket (45 x 0.15 x 0.17).
  • The percentage "of active female gamers [who] use mobile" is 55%. We can reasonably assume that 1.4% of those gamers are Easy Accessors in this age bracket (55 x 0.15 x 0.17).
  • Two-thirds (66%) of people in both the bottom 25% and top 25% income brackets are mobile gamers. Thus, it can be reasonably assumed that 1.68% of people in each of the aforementioned income brackets are Easy Accessors in this age bracket (66 x 0.15 x 0.17).
  • Among people in the middle income bracket, 67% are mobile gamers. Based on that information, we can assume that 1.71% of people in the middle income bracket are Easy Accessors in this age group (67 x 0.15 x 0.17).
  • Among mobile gamers, 56% play such games over ten times per week. Thus, it can be reasonably assumed that 1.43% of those gamers are Easy Accessors in this age bracket (56 x 0.15 x 0.17).
  • Among mobile gamers, 19% play such games between six and nine times per week. From that information, we can assume that 0.48% of those gamers are Easy Accessors in this age bracket (19 x 0.15 x 0.17).

GAMING/TECH-RELATED WEBSITES

  • Fifty-four percent of mobile gamers "discover new mobile games on the Facebook family of apps." Thus, it can be reasonably assumed that Easy Accessors in this age bracket account for 1.38% of those gamers (54 x 0.15 x 0.17).
  • Fifty-three percent of mobile gamers "do little or no research before choosing a new game to download" and thus "if a mobile game looks interesting, they just try it." From that information, we can assume that 1.35% of those gamers are Easy Accessors in this age bracket (53 x 0.15 x 0.17).
  • The percentage "of gamers [who] download free games multiple times each year" is 85%. We can reasonably assume that Easy Accessors in this age bracket account for 2.17% of those gamers (85 x 0.15 x 0.17).
  • The percentage of gamers who "regularly pay[] to download games" is 55%. Based upon that data, it can be assumed that 1.4% of those gamers are Easy Accessors in this age bracket (55 x 0.15 x 0.17).

    GAMING/TECH BRANDS

    1. Operating System

    • The percentage of mobile gamers who use Android is 78%. Thus, we can reasonably assume that Easy Accessors in this age bracket account for 2% of those gamers (78 x 0.15 x 0.17).

    2. Game Publishers

    A. Playrix

    • Among those who play mobile games on a heavy basis (61+ hours/month on average), 54% play games published by Playrix. From that data, we can assume that 1.38% of those mobile gamers are Easy Accessors in this age group (54 x 0.15 x 0.17).
    • Among those who play mobile games on a medium basis (8+ hours/month average), 38% play games published by Playrix. Thus, we can reasonably assume that Easy Accessors in this age group account for 0.97% of those mobile gamers (38 x 0.15 x 0.17).
    • Among those who play mobile games on a light basis (18 minutes each month), 8% play games published by Playrix. Based on that data, we assumed that Easy Accessors in this age group account for 0.2% of those mobile gamers (8 x 0.15 x 0.17).

    B. Rovio

    • Among those who play mobile games on a heavy basis, 51% play games published by Rovio. Thus, it can be reasonably assumed that Easy Accessors in this age group account for 1.3% of those mobile gamers (51 x 0.15 x 0.17).
    • Among those who play mobile games on a medium basis, 51% play games published by Rovio. From that data, we can assume that 1.3% of those mobile gamers are Easy Accessors in this age bracket (51 x 0.15 x 0.17).
    • Among those who play mobile games on a light basis, 4% play games published by Rovio. We can assume from that information that Easy Accessors in this age group account for 0.1% of those mobile gamers (4 x 0.15 x 0.17).

    C. Scopely

    • Among those who play mobile games on a heavy basis, 50% play games published by Scopely. Thus, it can be reasonably assumed that Easy Accessors in this age group account for 1.28% of those mobile gamers (50 x 0.15 x 0.17).
    • Among those who play mobile games on a medium basis, 45% play games published by Scopely. Based on that data, we can reasonably assume that 1.15% of those mobile gamers are Easy Accessors in this age bracket (45 x 0.15 x 0.17).
    • Among those who play mobile games on a light basis, 4% play games published by Scopely. We can assume that Easy Accessors in this age group account for 0.1% of those mobile gamers (4 x 0.15 x 0.17).

    D. Activision

    • Among those who play mobile games on a heavy basis, 43% play games published by Activision. Thus, it can be reasonably assumed that Easy Accessors in this age group account for 1.1% of those mobile gamers (43 x 0.15 x 0.17).
    • Among those who play mobile games on a medium basis, 48% play games published by Activision. From that data, we assumed that 1.2% of those mobile gamers are Easy Accessors in this age bracket (48 x 0.15 x 0.17).
    • Among those who play mobile games on a light basis, 9% play games published by Activision. We can reasonably assume from that data that Easy Accessors in this age group account for 0.23% of those mobile gamers (9 x 0.15 x 0.17).

    E. Supercell

    • Among those who play mobile games on a heavy basis, 40% play games published by Supercell. Thus, it can be reasonably assumed that Easy Accessors in this age group account for 1.02% of those mobile gamers (40 x 0.15 x 0.17).
    • Among those who play mobile games on a medium basis, 51% play games published by Supercell. Based on that data, we can assume that 1.3% of those mobile gamers are Easy Accessors in this age bracket (51 x 0.15 x 0.17).
    • Among those who play mobile games on a light basis, 9% play games published by Supercell. We can assume from that data that Easy Accessors in this age group account for 0.23% of those mobile gamers (9 x 0.15 x 0.17).

    F. Nintendo

    • Among those who play mobile games on a heavy basis, 32% play games published by Nintendo. Thus, it can be reasonably assumed that Easy Accessors in this age group account for 0.82% of those mobile gamers (32 x 0.15 x 0.17).
    • Among those who play mobile games on a medium basis, 51% play games published by Nintendo. From that data, we can assume that 1.3% of those mobile gamers are Easy Accessors in this age group (51 x 0.15 x 0.17).
    • Among those who play mobile games on a light basis, 17% play games published by Nintendo. We can reasonably assume that Easy Accessors in this age group account for 0.43% of those mobile gamers (17 x 0.15 x 0.17).

    WAYS TO REACH

    • Over half (54%) of mobile gamers "discover new mobile games on the Facebook family of apps." We can reasonably assume from that data that 1.38% of those mobile gamers are Easy Accessors in this age group (54 x 0.15 x 0.17).
    • Over two-thirds (67%) of paying mobile gamers "discover new mobile games on the Facebook family of apps." Thus, we can assume that 1.71% of those mobile gamers are Easy Accessors in this age group (67 x 0.15 x 0.17).
    • Just over one-fourth (27%) of mobile gamers "are influenced by the ability to play with friends when deciding which mobile game to try." Based on that data, we can reasonably assume that Easy Accessors in this age bracket account for 0.69% of those mobile gamers (27 x 0.15 x 0.17).
    • More than one-third (39%) of paying mobile gamers "are influenced by the ability to play with friends when deciding which mobile game to try." From that information, we can assume that 0.99% of those mobile gamers are Easy Accessors in this age group (39 x 0.15 x 0.17).
    • Nearly three-fourths (74%) of high-paying mobile gamers "discover new mobile games on the Facebook family of apps." We can reasonably assume from that data that 1.89% of those mobile gamers are Easy Accessors in this age group (74 x 0.15 x 0.17).
    • Almost half (48%) of high-paying mobile gamers "are influenced by the ability to play with friends when deciding which mobile game to try." Thus, we can assume that Easy Accessors in this age bracket account for 1.22% of those mobile gamers (48 x 0.15 x 0.17).

    PAIN POINTS IN GAMING

    • Among mobile gamers, 84% "have experienced one or more friction points" during the discovery phase. We can reasonably assume that 2.14% of those mobile gamers are Easy Accessors in this age group (84 x 0.15 x 0.17).
    • Among mobile gamers, 90% "have experienced one or more friction points" during the installation phase. Based on that data, we assumed that Easy Accessors in this age bracket account for 2.3% of those mobile gamers (90 x 0.15 x 0.17).
    • Among mobile gamers, 96% "have experienced one or more friction points" during the post-installation phase. We can reasonably assume from that data that 2.45% of those mobile gamers are Easy Accessors in this age group (96 x 0.15 x 0.17).
    • Over half (56%) of mobile gamers "stopped playing a mobile game after one time because it wasn't entertaining." From that information, we can assume that 1.43% of those mobile gamers are Easy Accessors in this age group (56 x 0.15 x 0.17).

RESEARCH STRATEGY

To build this profile, data was collated from sources like the EEDAR Gamer Segmentation Report, the Facebook Insights Tool, research from Facebook Gaming marketing reports, and additional highlights from media and market research findings. Please note that when using the Facebook Insights tool to provide the presented psychographic data, the following segments were chosen based upon assumptions from the corresponding demographic profile: ages 45-54 and interest choices of board games, browser games, card games, casino games, and online games. The reason our data applies to the 45-54 age range (and doesn't include ages 55-59) is because that was the most-closely aligned age range we could find for information about mobile gamers in the U.S. Some data points apply to multiple segments of the profiles within this project. Our research findings are focused on mobile gamers because Easy Accessors are categorized as playing mobile games. All calculations that resulted in values with decimal points were rounded to the nearest hundredth.
Part
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Part
20

Transitionals (45-60) - Gaming Psychographics

To build a psychographic profile for the average Transitional between the ages of 45 and 60, this data follows the basic demographic profile which was built in earlier research. Transitionals are avid gamers who are in the process of transitioning from PC and console gaming to mobile gaming due to changes in their lives, such as raising a family. However, Transitionals are still likely to game on PC and/or console when circumstances allow.

Gameplay Habits

1. By Gender

  • Among mobile gamers, 37% are men. Thus, we can reasonably estimate that 0.61% of mobile gamers are male Transitionals in the 45-60 age bracket (37 x 0.15 (because 15% of mobile gamers are between the ages of 45 and 54) x 0.11 (because approximately 11% of U.S. gamers are Transitionals)).
  • The reason our data applies to the 45-54 age range (and doesn't include 55-60) is because that was the most-closely aligned age range we could find for information about mobile gamers in the U.S.
  • Among mobile gamers, 63% (100% — 37% (men)) are women. Thus, it can be reasonably estimated that 1.04% of mobile gamers are female Transitionals in this age bracket (63 x 0.15 x 0.11).
  • Research found that "47% of male mobile gamers play a mobile game" on a daily basis. We can estimate that 0.78% of those gamers are Transitionals in this age bracket (47 x 0.15 x 0.11).
  • The percentage "of active male gamers [who] use mobile" is 45%. Thus, we can estimate that 0.74% of those gamers are Transitionals in this age bracket (45 x 0.15 x 0.11).
  • The percentage "of active female gamers [who] use mobile" is 55%. We can reasonably estimate that 0.91% of those gamers are Transitionals in this age bracket (55 x 0.15 x 0.11).
  • The gender breakdown of PC gamers is heavily skewed towards men, as 64% of such gamers are men, while 36% are women. Based on that data, we estimate that Transitionals in this age group account for 1.06% of those male gamers (64 x 0.15 x 0.11) and 0.59% of those female gamers (36 x 0.15 x 0.11).
  • The gender breakdown of console gamers is also skewed towards men, as 60% of such gamers are men, while 40% are women. Thus, we can reasonably estimate that 0.99% of those male gamers (60 x 0.15 x 0.11) and 0.66% of those female gamers (40 x 0.15 x 0.11) are Transitionals in this age group.

2. By Income

  • Two-thirds (66%) of people in both the bottom 25% and top 25% income brackets are mobile gamers. Thus, it can be reasonably estimated that 1.09% of people in each of the aforementioned income brackets are Transitionals in this age group (66 x 0.15 x 0.11).
  • Among people in the middle income bracket, 67% are mobile gamers. Based on that information, we can estimate that 1.11% of people in the middle income bracket are Transitionals in this age group (67 x 0.15 x 0.11).

3. By Time/Frequency

  • Among mobile gamers, 56% play such games over ten times per week. Thus, it can be reasonably estimated that 0.92% of those gamers are Transitionals in this age bracket (56 x 0.15 x 0.11).
  • Among mobile gamers, 19% play such games between six and nine times per week. From that information, we can estimate that 0.31% of those gamers are Transitionals in this age bracket (19 x 0.15 x 0.11).
  • Forty-seven percent of men reported gaming either often or sometimes. We reasonably estimated that Transitionals in this age group account for 0.78% of those gamers (47 x 0.15 x 0.11).
  • Forty percent of women reported gaming either often or sometimes. Based on that data, we can estimate that 0.66% of those gamers are Transitionals in this age group (40 x 0.15 x 0.11).
  • Among PC Gamers in the U.S., 26% spend between one and two hours using the PC per sitting. Thus, it can be reasonably estimated that 0.43% of those gamers are Transitionals in this age bracket (26 x 0.15 x 0.11).
  • Just over one-fourth of gamers (26.8%) play video games for seven or more hours each week. We can estimate from that data that Transitionals in this age group account for 0.44% of those gamers (26.8 x 0.15 x 0.11).

4. By Device (and Irrespective of Gender)

  • The percentage of gamers who play games on all three platforms (PC, console, and phone) is 27%. Based on that data, it's reasonable to estimate that 0.45% of those gamers are Transitionals in this age group (27 x 0.15 x 0.11).
  • The percentage of gamers who play games on a phone plus at least one other device is 59%. Thus, we can estimate that Transitionals in this age group account for 0.97% of those gamers (59 x 0.15 x 0.11).

GAMING/TECH-RELATED WEBSITES

  • Fifty-three percent of mobile gamers "do little or no research before choosing a new game to download" and thus "if a mobile game looks interesting, they just try it." From that information, we can estimate that 0.87% of those gamers are Transitionals in this age bracket (53 x 0.15 x 0.11).
  • The percentage "of gamers [who] download free games multiple times each year" is 85%. We can reasonably estimate that Transitionals in this age bracket account for 1.4% of those gamers (85 x 0.15 x 0.11).
  • The percentage of gamers who "regularly pay[] to download games" is 55%. Based upon that data, it can be estimated that 0.91% of those gamers are Transitionals in this age bracket (55 x 0.15 x 0.11).
  • U.S. gamers who pay for mobile games "are 1.6x more likely to find new games using Instagram than mobile gamers in general."
  • U.S. gamers who are categorized as "high-paying mobile gamers are more than twice as likely to discover a game on Instagram or Messenger than U.S. mobile gamers in general."

GAMING/TECH BRANDS

1. Operating System

  • The percentage of mobile gamers who use Android is 78%. Thus, we can reasonably estimate that Transitionals in this age bracket account for 1.29% of those gamers (78 x 0.15 x 0.11).

2. Game Publishers

A. Playrix

  • Among those who play mobile games on a heavy basis (61+ hours/month on average), 54% play games published by Playrix. From that data, we can estimate that 0.89% of those mobile gamers are Transitionals in this age group (54 x 0.15 x 0.11).
  • Among those who play mobile games on a medium basis (8+ hours/month average), 38% play games published by Playrix. Thus, we can reasonably estimate that Transitionals in this age group account for 0.63% of those mobile gamers (38 x 0.15 x 0.11).
  • We didn't include gamers who play on a light basis for this publisher or any other publisher because Transitionals constitute "invested adult gamers" which is the opposite of the casual gamer.
  • All the underlying data included in this Game Publishers section is also included in this Google Doc.

B. Rovio

  • Among those who play mobile games on a heavy basis, 51% play games published by Rovio. Thus, it can be reasonably estimated that Transitionals in this age group account for 0.84% of those mobile gamers (51 x 0.15 x 0.11).
  • Among those who play mobile games on a medium basis, 51% play games published by Rovio. From that data, we can estimate that 0.84% of those mobile gamers are Transitionals in this age bracket (51 x 0.15 x 0.11).

C. Scopely

  • Among those who play mobile games on a heavy basis, 50% play games published by Scopely. Thus, it can be reasonably estimated that Transitionals in this age group account for 0.83% of those mobile gamers (50 x 0.15 x 0.11).
  • Among those who play mobile games on a medium basis, 45% play games published by Scopely. Based on that data, we can reasonably estimate that 0.74% of those mobile gamers are Transitionals in this age bracket (45 x 0.15 x 0.11).

D. Activision

  • Among those who play mobile games on a heavy basis, 43% play games published by Activision. Thus, it can be reasonably estimated that Transitionals in this age group account for 0.71% of those mobile gamers (43 x 0.15 x 0.11).
  • Among those who play mobile games on a medium basis, 48% play games published by Activision. From that data, we estimated that 0.79% of those mobile gamers are Transitionals in this age bracket (48 x 0.15 x 0.11).

E. Supercell

  • Among those who play mobile games on a heavy basis, 40% play games published by Supercell. Thus, it can be reasonably estimated that Transitionals in this age group account for 0.66% of those mobile gamers (40 x 0.15 x 0.11).
  • Among those who play mobile games on a medium basis, 51% play games published by Supercell. Based on that data, we can estimate that 0.84% of those mobile gamers are Transitionals in this age bracket (51 x 0.15 x 0.11).

F. Nintendo

  • Among those who play mobile games on a heavy basis, 32% play games published by Nintendo. Thus, it can be reasonably estimated that Transitionals in this age group account for 0.53% of those mobile gamers (32 x 0.15 x 0.11).
  • Among those who play mobile games on a medium basis, 51% play games published by Nintendo. From that data, we can estimate that 0.84% of those mobile gamers are Transitionals in this age group (51 x 0.15 x 0.11).

WAYS TO REACH

  • Over half (54%) of mobile gamers "discover new mobile games on the Facebook family of apps." We can reasonably estimate from that data that 0.89% of those mobile gamers are Transitionals in this age group (54 x 0.15 x 0.11).
  • Over two-thirds (67%) of paying mobile gamers "discover new mobile games on the Facebook family of apps." Thus, we can estimate that 1.11% of those mobile gamers are Transitionals in this age group (67 x 0.15 x 0.11).
  • Just over one-fourth (27%) of mobile gamers "are influenced by the ability to play with friends when deciding which mobile game to try." Based on that data, we can reasonably estimate that Transitionals in this age bracket account for 0.45% of those mobile gamers (27 x 0.15 x 0.11).
  • More than one-third (39%) of paying mobile gamers "are influenced by the ability to play with friends when deciding which mobile game to try." From that information, we can estimate that 0.64% of those mobile gamers are Transitionals in this age group (39 x 0.15 x 0.11).
  • Nearly three-fourths (74%) of high-paying mobile gamers "discover new mobile games on the Facebook family of apps." We can reasonably estimate from that data that 1.22% of those mobile gamers are Transitionals in this age group (74 x 0.15 x 0.11).
  • Almost half (48%) of high-paying mobile gamers "are influenced by the ability to play with friends when deciding which mobile game to try." Thus, we can estimate that Transitionals in this age bracket account for 0.79% of those mobile gamers (48 x 0.15 x 0.11).

PAIN POINTS IN GAMING

  • A survey of U.S. gamers found that "the most frustrating part of downloading video games" is download time, as 39.4% cited that as their top frustration. Based on that data, it's reasonable to estimate that 0.65% of those gamers are Transitionals in this age group (39.4 x 0.15 x 0.11).
  • That same survey found that the second-most-commonly-cited frustration with video game downloads is downloads not working, as 25.5% of gamers said that is their top frustration. We estimate that Transitionals in this age group account for 0.42% of those gamers (25.5 x 0.15 x 0.11).
  • The survey also revealed that the third-most-commonly-cited frustration with video game downloads is an interruption that occurs during the download process, which thus requires re-starting the download, as 17.6% of gamers cited that as their top frustration. Thus, we can estimate that 0.29% of those gamers are Transitionals in this age bracket (17.6 x 0.15 x 0.11).
  • Among mobile gamers, 84% "have experienced one or more friction points" during the discovery phase. We can reasonably estimate that 1.39% of those mobile gamers are Transitionals in this age group (84 x 0.15 x 0.11).
  • Among mobile gamers, 90% "have experienced one or more friction points" during the installation phase. Based on that data, we estimated that Transitionals in this age bracket account for 1.49% of those mobile gamers (90 x 0.15 x 0.11).
  • Among mobile gamers, 96% "have experienced one or more friction points" during the post-installation phase. We can reasonably estimate from that data that 1.58% of those mobile gamers are Transitionals in this age group (96 x 0.15 x 0.11).
  • Over half (56%) of mobile gamers "stopped playing a mobile game after one time because it wasn't entertaining." From that information, we can estimate that 0.92% of those mobile gamers are Transitionals in this age group (56 x 0.15 x 0.11).

Research Strategy

To build this profile, data was collated from sources like the EEDAR Gamer Segmentation Report, the Facebook Insights Tool, research from Facebook Gaming marketing reports, and additional highlights from media and market research findings. Please note that when using the Facebook Insights tool to provide the presented psychographic data, the following segments were chosen based upon assumptions from the corresponding demographic profile: Ages 45-60 and interest choices of board games, browser games, card games, casino games, and online games.

A lot of our data is focused on mobile gamers because Transitionals are defined as "invested adult gamers whose stage of life means shifting from HD-centric gaming to more flexible mobile gaming." However, since Transitionals are in flux between HD and mobile gaming, they presumably still play PC and console games, though likely on a less-frequent basis. Accordingly, we also included some data about PC and console gamers as it relates to Transitionals. Some data points apply to multiple segments of the profiles within this project. For all calculations that resulted in values with decimal points, those resulting values were rounded to the nearest hundredth.
Part
21
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Part
21

Incidental Players (35-45) - Gaming Psychographics

To build a psychographic profile for the average Incidental Player between the ages of 35 to 45, this data follows the basic demographic profile which was built in earlier research. This typical Incidental Player is female and prefers to play on her smartphone. She is most likely college-educated, married, and has children. She is more likely to make an in-game purchase than her male counterpart.

GAMEPLAY HABITS

Given that the average Incidental Player between 35 and 45 is likely college educated and college-educated gamers are three times more likely to make in-app purchases, it can be inferred that they are what an Accenture study defines as a high-paying mobile gamer. The following in-game habits apply to this segment:
  • They are "1.8 times more likely than the general mobile gaming population to say that the ability to play with friends is influential when deciding which games to play".
  • With regard to in-game purchases, "52% of this segment will purchase new resources, tools and weapons; 41% purchase limited-edition gameplay features; 37% purchase extra lives, 36% customize their avatar; and 27% shorten waiting time or advance faster".
  • These players are "1.9 times more likely to make in-game purchases to win against their friends; 1.5 times more likely to make in-game purchases to make the game exciting again; and 1.3 times more likely to make in-game purchases to stay competitive against other players".
  • Surprisingly, based on the above, "only 21% of paying mobile gamers say that they make in-game purchases to eliminate ads altogether".
Additional habits and preferences:
  •   78% of mobile gamers are Android users thus it can be inferred this overwhelming majority would carry over to this segment, making Android the preferred device of the Incidental Players.
  • 56.8% of all gamers have admitted that they had skipped sleep in order to keep playing a video game, logically it can be assumed that 14.8% (.568 x .26) of those are Incidental Players.
  • Data from Statista (originally published in 2016 but updated in 2019) states that 77% of gamers prefer to play alone, logically it can be assumed that 20% (.77 x .26) of those are Incidental Players.

GAMING/TECH RELATED WEBSITES

  •   54% of mobile gamers discover new mobile games on the Facebook family of apps. It can be reasonably assumed based on data in the demographics report, 14% (.54 x .26) of these fall into the Incidental Player category.
  • 53% of mobile gamers do little or no research before choosing a new game to download, "if a mobile game looks interesting, they just try it". It can be reasonably assumed based on data in the demographics report, 13.8% (.53 x .26) of these fall into the Incidental Player category.
  • 47.2% of US gamers "will not continue to make purchases or play games on a website that has previously suffered a security breach" and only 16.6% state "they would continue to do business with a website after it has been hacked". Logically it can be assumed that of these 12.2% (.472 x .26) and 4.3% (.166 x .26) respectively are Incidental Players.
  • 85% of gamers download free games multiple times each year while only 55% admit to regularly paying to download games. Logically, it can be assumed that 22.1% (.85 x .26) and 14.3% (.55 x .26) are Incidental Players.

GAMING/TECH BRANDS

According to Facebook Insights, the following applies to the 20-25 million Facebook subscribers who fit into the Daily Dabblers segment:
  • The most popular game app page visited is Words with Friends.
  • The top five entertainment pages visited are: Total Nerd, Cracked.com, Awkward Family Photos, Hulu, and Ranker.
  • The most popular blogger pages visited are Get It Free and Graveyard Shift.
  • Family Feud 2 is noted as the most popular video game in this segment.
  • The most popular game page visited is Monopoly.

WAYS TO REACH

  • Incidental Players on Facebook "follow or like specific mobile games pages, follow or like mobile game brands, and engage with posts from friends about mobile games" and use Facebook Messenger to "chat with friends about mobile games, give friends mobile game recommendations, and ask for mobile game recommendations."
  • Incidental Players on Instagram "follow or like mobile game brands, follow or like specific mobile games, and follow or like gamers and influencers".
  • Of the estimated 20-25 million Incidental Players on Facebook, they are likely to comment on 18 pages, like 26 posts from pages they follow, share 4 posts from pages they follow, redeem 1 promotion, and click on 30 ads each month.

PAIN POINTS IN GAMING

As the majority of the Incidental Players between 35 and 45 play games on their smart phones, pain points in mobile game play are germane to this segment. The following friction points (activity that influences or causes a gamer to abandon the download, purchase or play stages of their journey), identified by Facebook IQ and GfK, apply to this segment and can be categorized into three stages — discovery, install and post-install:
  • 84% of gamers (and as such approximately 21% are classified as Incidental Players) have experienced at least one friction point at the discovery stage.
  • 90% overall have experienced at least one friction point during the install process and 98% have experienced a friction point post-install.
  • At the discovery phase, the following are the top five friction points: ad is of poor quality and/or poor look and feel of ad, an ad leads to the wrong page, irrelevant ads or offers, inability to skip the ad, and not understanding the content of the game from the ad.
  • During the install phase, the following are the top five friction points: downloading of the app took too long, the game did not look easy to play on mobile device, request for access to friend list via social media, slow data connection, and having to wait for Wi-Fi access.
  • The most common friction points post-install are ad-experience related and are: not being able to skip the ad, the ad leads to wrong page, and poor quality/look and feel of ad.

RESEARCH STRATEGY

To build this profile, data was collated from sources like the EEDAR Gamer Segmentation Report, the Facebook Insights Tool, research from Facebook Gaming marketing reports, and additional highlights from media and market research findings. Please note that when using the Facebook Insights tool to provide the presented psychographic data, the following segments were chosen based upon assumptions from the corresponding demographic profile: aged over 60 and interest choices of board games, browser games, card games, casino games, and online games. Some data points apply to multiple segments of the profiles within this project.
Part
22
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Part
22

Daily Dabbers (35-45) - Gaming Psychographics

To build a psychographic profile for the average Daily Dabbler, this data follows the basic demographic profile which was built in earlier research. This typical Daily Dabbler gamer between 35 and 45 is female and prefers to play on her smartphone. She is most likely college-educated, married, and has children. She is more likely to make an in-game purchase than her male counterpart.

GAMEPLAY HABITS

Given that the average 35-45 year old Daily Dabbler is likely college educated and college-educated gamers are three times more likely to make in-app purchases, it can be inferred that they are what an Accenture study defines as a high-paying mobile gamers. The following in-game habits apply to this segment:
  • They are "1.8 times more likely than the general mobile gaming population to say that the ability to play with friends is influential when deciding which games to play".
  • With regard to in-game purchases, "52% of this segment will purchase new resources, tools and weapons; 41% purchase limited-edition gameplay features; 37% purchase extra lives, 36% customize their avatar; and 27% shorten waiting time or advance faster".
  • These players are "1.9 times more likely to make in-game purchases to win against their friends; 1.5 times more likely to make in-game purchases to make the game exciting again; and 1.3 times more likely to make in-game purchases to stay competitive against other players".
  • Surprisingly, based on the above, "only 21% of paying mobile gamers say that they make in-game purchases to eliminate ads altogether".
Additional habits and preferences:
  • 78% of mobile gamers are Android users thus it can be inferred this overwhelming majority would carry over to this segment, making Android the preferred device of the Daily Dabbler.
  • 56.8% of all gamers have admitted that they had skipped sleep in order to keep playing a video game, logically it can be assumed that 10.8% (.568 x .19) of those are Daily Dabblers.
  • Data from Statista (originally published in 2016 but updated in 2019) states that 77% of gamers prefer to play alone, logically it can be assumed that 14.6% (.77 x .19) of Daily Dabblers choose to play alone.

GAMING/TECH RELATED WEBSITES

  • 54% of mobile gamers discover new mobile games on the Facebook family of apps. It can be reasonably assumed based on data in the demographics report, 10.3% (.54 x .19) of these fall into the Daily Dabbler category.
  • 53% of mobile gamers do little or no research before choosing a new game to download, "if a mobile game looks interesting, they just try it". It can be reasonably assumed based on data in the demographics report, 10.1% (.53 x .19) of these fall into the Daily Dabbler category.
  • 47.2% of US gamers "will not continue to make purchases or play games on a website that has previously suffered a security breach" and only 16.6% state "they would continue to do business with a website after it has been hacked". Logically it can be assumed that of these 9% (.472 x .19) and 3.1% (.166 x .19)respectively are Daily Dabblers.
  • 85% of gamers download free games multiple times each year while only 55% admit to regularly paying to download games. Logically, it can be assumed that 16.1% (.161 x .19) and 10.5% (.105 x .19) are Daily Dabblers.

GAMING/TECH BRANDS

According to Facebook Insights, the following applies to the 20-25 million Facebook subscribers who fit into the Daily Dabblers segment:
  • The most popular game app page visited is Words with Friends.
  • The top five entertainment pages visited are: Total Nerd, Cracked.com, Awkward Family Photos, Hulu, and Ranker.
  • The most popular blogger pages visited are Get It Free and Graveyard Shift.
  • Family Feud 2 is noted as the most popular video game in this segment.
  • The most popular game page visited is Monopoly.

WAYS TO REACH

  • Daily Dabblers on Facebook "follow or like specific mobile games pages, follow or like mobile game brands, and engage with posts from friends about mobile games" and use Facebook Messenger to "chat with friends about mobile games, give friends mobile game recommendations, and ask for mobile game recommendations."
  • Daily Dabblers on Instagram "follow or like mobile game brands, follow or like specific mobile games, and follow or like gamers and influencers".
  • Of the estimated 20-25 million Daily Dabblers on Facebook, they are likely to comment on 18 pages, like 26 posts from pages they follow, share 4 posts from pages they follow, redeem 1 promotion, and click on 30 ads each month.

PAIN POINTS IN GAMING

As the majority of the 35-45 year Daily Dabblers play games on their smart phones, pain points in mobile game play are germane to this segment. The following friction points (activity that influences or causes a gamer to abandon the download, purchase or play stages of their journey), identified by Facebook IQ and GfK, apply to this segment and can be categorized into three stages — discovery, install and post-install:
  • 84% of gamers (and as such approximately 16% are classified as Daily Dabblers) have experienced at least one friction point at the discovery stage.
  • 90% overall have experienced at least one friction point during the install process and 98% have experienced a friction point post-install.
  • At the discovery phase, the following are the top five friction points: ad is of poor quality and/or poor look and feel of ad, an ad leads to the wrong page, irrelevant ads or offers, inability to skip the ad, and not understanding the content of the game from the ad.
  • During the install phase, the following are the top five friction points: downloading of the app took too long, the game did not look easy to play on mobile device, request for access to friend list via social media, slow data connection, and having to wait for Wi-Fi access.
  • The most common friction points post-install are ad-experience related and are: not being able to skip the ad, the ad leads to wrong page, and poor quality/look and feel of ad.

RESEARCH STRATEGY

To build this profile, data was collated from sources like the EEDAR Gamer Segmentation Report, the Facebook Insights Tool, research from Facebook Gaming marketing reports, and additional highlights from media and market research findings. Please note that when using the Facebook Insights tool to provide the presented psychographic data, the following segments were chosen based upon assumptions from the corresponding demographic profile: age 35-45 and interest choices of board games, browser games, card games, casino games, and online games. Some data points apply to multiple segments of the profiles within this project.
Part
23
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Part
23

Easy Accessors (35-45) - Gaming Psychographics

To build a psychographic profile for the average Easy Accessor between the ages of 35 and 45, this data follows the basic demographic profile which was built in earlier research. This typical Easy Accessor is female and prefers to play on her smartphone. She is most likely in a lower-income bracket, is married (or has been before), and has children.

GAMEPLAY HABITS

  • Among mobile gamers, 37% are men. Thus, it can be reasonably assumed that 1.2% of mobile gamers are male Easy Accessors in the 35-44 age bracket (37 x 0.19 (because 19% of mobile gamers are between the ages of 35 and 44) x 0.17 (because approximately 17% of U.S. gamers are Easy Accessors)).
  • Among mobile gamers, 63% (100% — 37% (men)) are women. Thus, it can be reasonably assumed that 2.03% of mobile gamers are female Easy Accessors in this age bracket (63 x 0.19 x 0.17).
  • Research found that "47% of male mobile gamers play a mobile game" on a daily basis. We can assume that 1.52% of those gamers are Easy Accessors in this age bracket (47 x 0.19 x 0.17).
  • The percentage "of active male gamers [who] use mobile" is 45%. Thus, we can assume that 1.45% of those gamers are Easy Accessors in this age bracket (45 x 0.19 x 0.17).
  • The percentage "of active female gamers [who] use mobile" is 55%. We can reasonably assume that 1.78% of those gamers are Easy Accessors in this age bracket (55 x 0.19 x 0.17).
  • Two-thirds (66%) of people in both the bottom 25% and top 25% of the income brackets are mobile gamers. Thus, it can be reasonably assumed that 2.13% of people in each of the aforementioned income brackets are Easy Accessors in this age bracket (66 x 0.19 x 0.17).
  • Among people in the middle income bracket, 67% are mobile gamers. Based on that information, we can assume that 2.16% of people in the middle income bracket are Easy Accessors in this age bracket (67 x 0.19 x 0.17).
  • Among mobile gamers, 56% play such games over ten times per week. Thus, it can be reasonably assumed that 1.81% of those gamers are Easy Accessors in this age bracket (56 x 0.19 x 0.17).
  • Among mobile gamers, 19% play such games between six and nine times per week. From that information, we can assume that 0.61% of those gamers are Easy Accessors in this age bracket (19 x 0.19 x 0.17).

GAMING/TECH-RELATED WEBSITES

  • Fifty-four percent of mobile gamers "discover new mobile games on the Facebook family of apps." Thus, it can be reasonably assumed that Easy Accessors in this age bracket account for 1.74% of those gamers (54 x 0.19 x 0.17).
  • Fifty-three percent of mobile gamers "do little or no research before choosing a new game to download" and thus "if a mobile game looks interesting, they just try it." From that information, we can assume that 1.71% of those gamers are Easy Accessors in this age bracket (53 x 0.19 x 0.17).
  • The percentage "of gamers [who] download free games multiple times each year" is 85%. We can be reasonably assume that Easy Accessors in this age bracket account for 2.75% of those gamers (85 x 0.19 x 0.17).
  • The percentage of gamers who "regularly pay[] to download games" is 55%. Based upon that data, it can be assumed that 1.78% of those gamers are Easy Accessors in this age bracket (55 x 0.19 x 0.17).

GAMING/TECH BRANDS

1. Operating System

  • The percentage of mobile gamers who use Android is 78%. Thus, we can reasonably assume that Easy Accessors in this age bracket account for 2.52% of those gamers (78 x 0.19 x 0.17).

2. Game Publishers

A. Playrix

  • Among those who play mobile games on a heavy basis (61+ hours/month on average), 54% play games published by Playrix. From that data, we can assume that 1.74% of those mobile gamers are Easy Accessors in this age group (54 x 0.19 x 0.17).
  • Among those who play mobile games on a medium basis (8+ hours/month average), 38% play games published by Playrix. Thus, we can reasonably assume that Easy Accessors in this age group account for 1.23% of those mobile gamers (38 x 0.19 x 0.17).
  • Among those who play mobile games on a light basis (18 minutes each month), 8% play games published by Playrix. Based on that data, we assumed that Easy Accessors in this age group account for 0.26% of those mobile gamers (8 x 0.19 x 0.17).

B. Rovio

  • Among those who play mobile games on a heavy basis, 51% play games published by Rovio. Thus, it can be reasonably assumed that Easy Accessors in this age group account for 1.65% of those mobile gamers (51 x 0.19 x 0.17).
  • Among those who play mobile games on a medium basis, 51% play games published by Rovio. From that data, we can assume that 1.65% of those mobile gamers are Easy Accessors in this age bracket (51 x 0.19 x 0.17).
  • Among those who play mobile games on a light basis, 4% play games published by Rovio. We can assume from that information that Easy Accessors in this age group account for 0.13% of those mobile gamers (4 x 0.19 x 0.17).

C. Scopely

  • Among those who play mobile games on a heavy basis, 50% play games published by Scopely. Thus, it can be reasonably assumed that Easy Accessors in this age group account for 1.62% of those mobile gamers (50 x 0.19 x 0.17).
  • Among those who play mobile games on a medium basis, 45% play games published by Scopely. Based on that data, we can reasonably assume that 1.45% of those mobile gamers are Easy Accessors in this age bracket (45 x 0.19 x 0.17).
  • Among those who play mobile games on a light basis, 4% play games published by Scopely. We can assume that Easy Accessors in this age group account for 0.13% of those mobile gamers (4 x 0.19 x 0.17).

D. Activision

  • Among those who play mobile games on a heavy basis, 43% play games published by Activision. Thus, it can be reasonably assumed that Easy Accessors in this age group account for 1.39% of those mobile gamers (43 x 0.19 x 0.17).
  • Among those who play mobile games on a medium basis, 48% play games published by Activision. From that data, we assume that 1.55% of those mobile gamers are Easy Accessors in this age bracket (48 x 0.19 x 0.17).
  • Among those who play mobile games on a light basis, 9% play games published by Activision. We can reasonably assume from that data that Easy Accessors in this age group account for 0.29% of those mobile gamers (9 x 0.19 x 0.17).

E. Supercell

  • Among those who play mobile games on a heavy basis, 40% play games published by Supercell. Thus, it can be reasonably assumed that Easy Accessors in this age group account for 1.29% of those mobile gamers (40 x 0.19 x 0.17).
  • Among those who play mobile games on a medium basis, 51% play games published by Supercell. Based on that data, we can assume that 1.65% of those mobile gamers are Easy Accessors in this age bracket (51 x 0.19 x 0.17).
  • Among those who play mobile games on a light basis, 9% play games published by Supercell. We can assume from that data that Easy Accessors in this age group account for 0.29% of those mobile gamers (9 x 0.19 x 0.17).

F. Nintendo

  • Among those who play mobile games on a heavy basis, 32% play games published by Nintendo. Thus, it can be reasonably assumed that Easy Accessors in this age group account for 1.03% of those mobile gamers (32 x 0.19 x 0.17).
  • Among those who play mobile games on a medium basis, 51% play games published by Nintendo. From that data, we can assume that 1.65% of those mobile gamers are Easy Accessors in this age group (51 x 0.19 x 0.17).
  • Among those who play mobile games on a light basis, 17% play games published by Nintendo. We can reasonably assume that Easy Accessors in this age group account for 0.55% of those mobile gamers (17 x 0.19 x 0.17).

WAYS TO REACH

  • Over half (54%) of mobile gamers "discover new mobile games on the Facebook family of apps" We can reasonably assume from that data that 1.74% of those mobile gamers are Easy Accessors in this age group (54 x 0.19 x 0.17).
  • Over two-thirds (67%) of paying mobile gamers "discover new mobile games on the Facebook family of apps." Thus, we can assume that 2.16% of those mobile gamers are Easy Accessors in this age group (67 x 0.19 x 0.17).
  • Just over one-fourth (27%) of mobile gamers "are influenced by the ability to play with friends when deciding which mobile game to try." Based on that data, we can reasonably assume that Easy Accessors in this age bracket account for 0.87% of those mobile gamers (27 x 0.19 x 0.17).
  • More than one-third (39%) of paying mobile gamers "are influenced by the ability to play with friends when deciding which mobile game to try." From that information, we can assume that 1.26% of those mobile gamers are Easy Accessors in this age group (39 x 0.19 x 0.17).
  • Nearly three-fourths (74%) of high-paying mobile gamers "discover new mobile games on the Facebook family of apps." We can reasonably assume from that data that 2.39% of those mobile gamers are Easy Accessors in this age group (74 x 0.19 x 0.17).
  • Almost half (48%) of high-paying mobile gamers "are influenced by the ability to play with friends when deciding which mobile game to try." Thus, we can assume that Easy Accessors in this age bracket account for 1.55% of those mobile gamers (48 x 0.19 x 0.17).

PAIN POINTS IN GAMING

  • Among mobile gamers, 84% "have experienced one or more friction points" during the discovery phase. We can reasonably assume that 2.71% of those mobile gamers are Easy Accessors in this age group (84 x 0.19 x 0.17).
  • Among mobile gamers, 90% "have experienced one or more friction points" during the installation phase. Based on that data, we assumed that Easy Accessors in this age bracket account for 2.91% of those mobile gamers (90 x 0.19 x 0.17).
  • Among mobile gamers, 96% "have experienced one or more friction points" during the post-installation phase. We can reasonably assume from that data that 3.1% of those mobile gamers are Easy Accessors in this age group (96 x 0.19 x 0.17).
  • Over half (56%) of mobile gamers "stopped playing a mobile game after one time because it wasn't entertaining." From that information, we can assume that 1.81% of those mobile gamers are Easy Accessors in this age group (56 x 0.19 x 0.17).

RESEARCH STRATEGY

To build this profile, data was collated from sources like the EEDAR Gamer Segmentation Report, the Facebook Insights Tool, research from Facebook Gaming marketing reports, and additional highlights from media and market research findings. Please note that when using the Facebook Insights tool to provide the presented psychographic data, the following segments were chosen based upon assumptions from the corresponding demographic profile: ages 35-44 and interest choices of board games, browser games, card games, casino games, and online games. The reason age 45 is not included in our data is because that age is covered in other research. Some data points apply to multiple segments of the profiles within this project.
Part
24
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Part
24

Transitionals (35-45) - Gaming Psychographics

To build a psychographic profile for the average Transitional between the ages of 35 and 45, this data follows the basic demographic profile which was built in earlier research. Transitionals are avid gamers who are in the process of transitioning from PC and console gaming to mobile gaming due to changes in their lives, such as raising a family. However, Transitionals are still likely to game on PC and/or console when circumstances allow.

Gameplay Habits

1. By Gender

  • Among mobile gamers, 37% are men. Thus, we can reasonably estimate that 0.77% of mobile gamers are male Transitionals in the 35-45 age bracket (37 x 0.19 (because 19% of mobile gamers are between the ages of 34 and 44) x 0.11 (because approximately 11% of U.S. gamers are Transitionals)).
  • The reason our data applies to the 34-44 age range (and thus doesn't include 35 and 45 year-olds) is because that was the most-closely aligned age range that we could find regarding information about mobile gamers in the U.S. Plus, 45 year-olds are covered in other research.
  • Among mobile gamers, 63% (100% — 37% (men)) are women. Thus, it can be reasonably estimated that 1.32% of mobile gamers are female Transitionals in this age bracket (63 x 0.19 x 0.11).
  • Research found that "47% of male mobile gamers play a mobile game" on a daily basis. We can estimate that 0.98% of those gamers are Transitionals in this age bracket (47 x 0.19 x 0.11).
  • The percentage "of active male gamers [who] use mobile" is 45%. Thus, we can estimate that 0.94% of those gamers are Transitionals in this age bracket (45 x 0.19 x 0.11).
  • The percentage "of active female gamers [who] use mobile" is 55%. We can reasonably estimate that 1.15% of those gamers are Transitionals in this age bracket (55 x 0.19 x 0.11).
  • The gender breakdown of PC gamers is heavily skewed towards men, as 64% of such gamers are men, while 36% are women. Based on that data, we estimate that Transitionals in this age group account for 1.34% of those male gamers (64 x 0.19 x 0.11) and 0.75% of those female gamers (36 x 0.19 x 0.11).
  • The gender breakdown of console gamers is also skewed towards men, as 60% of such gamers are men, while 40% are women. Thus, we can reasonably estimate that 1.25% of those male gamers (60 x 0.19 x 0.11) and 0.84% of those female gamers (40 x 0.19 x 0.11) are Transitionals in this age group.

2. By Income

  • Two-thirds (66%) of people in both the bottom 25% and top 25% income brackets are mobile gamers. Thus, it can be reasonably estimated that 1.38% of people in each of the aforementioned income brackets are Transitionals in this age bracket (66 x 0.19 x 0.11).
  • Among people in the middle income bracket, 67% are mobile gamers. Based on that information, we can estimate that 1.4% of people in the middle income bracket are Transitionals in this age group (67 x 0.19 x 0.11).

3. By Time/Frequency

  • Among mobile gamers, 56% play such games over ten times per week. Thus, it can be reasonably estimated that 1.17% of those gamers are Transitionals in this age bracket (56 x 0.19 x 0.11).
  • Among mobile gamers, 19% play such games between six and nine times per week. From that information, we can estimate that 0.4% of those gamers are Transitionals in this age bracket (19 x 0.19 x 0.11).
  • Forty-seven percent of men reported gaming either often or sometimes. We reasonably estimated that Transitionals in this age group account for 0.98% of those gamers (47 x 0.19 x 0.11).
  • Forty percent of women reported gaming either often or sometimes. Based on that data, we can estimate that 0.84% of those gamers are Transitionals in this age group (40 x 0.19 x 0.11).
  • Among PC Gamers in the U.S., 26% spend between one and two hours using the PC per sitting. Thus, it can be reasonably estimated that 0.54% of those gamers are Transitionals in this age bracket (26 x 0.19 x 0.11).
  • Just over one-fourth of gamers (26.8%) play video games for seven or more hours each week. We can estimate from that data that Transitionals in this age group account for 0.56% of those gamers (26.8 x 0.19 x 0.11).

4. By Device (and Irrespective of Gender)

  • The percentage of gamers who play games on all three platforms (PC, console, and phone) is 27%. Based on that data, it's reasonable to estimate that 0.56% of those gamers are Transitionals in this age group (27 x 0.19 x 0.11).
  • The percentage of gamers who play games on a phone plus at least one other device is 59%. Thus, we can estimate that Transitionals in this age group account for 1.23% of those gamers (59 x 0.19 x 0.11).

GAMING/TECH-RELATED WEBSITES

  • Fifty-three percent of mobile gamers "do little or no research before choosing a new game to download" and thus "if a mobile game looks interesting, they just try it." From that information, we can estimate that 1.11% of those gamers are Transitionals in this age bracket (53 x 0.19 x 0.11).
  • The percentage "of gamers [who] download free games multiple times each year" is 85%. We can reasonably estimate that Transitionals in this age bracket account for 1.78% of those gamers (85 x 0.19 x 0.11).
  • The percentage of gamers who "regularly pay[] to download games" is 55%. Based upon that data, it can be estimated that 1.15% of those gamers are Transitionals in this age bracket (55 x 0.19 x 0.11).
  • U.S. gamers who pay for mobile games "are 1.6x more likely to find new games using Instagram than mobile gamers in general."
  • U.S. gamers who are categorized as "high-paying mobile gamers are more than twice as likely to discover a game on Instagram or Messenger than U.S. mobile gamers in general."

GAMING/TECH BRANDS

1. Operating System

  • The percentage of mobile gamers who use Android is 78%. Thus, we can reasonably estimate that Transitionals in this age bracket account for 1.63% of those gamers (78 x 0.19 x 0.11).

2. Game Publishers

A. Playrix

  • Among those who play mobile games on a heavy basis (61+ hours/month on average), 54% play games published by Playrix. From that data, we can estimate that 1.13% of those mobile gamers are Transitionals in this age group (54 x 0.19 x 0.11).
  • Among those who play mobile games on a medium basis (8+ hours/month average), 38% play games published by Playrix. Thus, we can reasonably estimate that Transitionals in this age group account for 0.79% of those mobile gamers (38 x 0.19 x 0.11).
  • We didn't include gamers who play on a light basis for this publisher or any other publisher because Transitionals constitute "invested adult gamers" which is the opposite of the casual gamer.
  • All data included in this Game Publishers section is also included in this Google Doc.

B. Rovio

  • Among those who play mobile games on a heavy basis, 51% play games published by Rovio. Thus, it can be reasonably estimated that Transitionals in this age group account for 1.07% of those mobile gamers (51 x 0.19 x 0.11).
  • Among those who play mobile games on a medium basis, 51% play games published by Rovio. From that data, we can estimate that 1.07% of those mobile gamers are Transitionals in this age bracket (51 x 0.19 x 0.11).

C. Scopely

  • Among those who play mobile games on a heavy basis, 50% play games published by Scopely. Thus, it can be reasonably estimated that Transitionals in this age group account for 1.05% of those mobile gamers (50 x 0.19 x 0.11).
  • Among those who play mobile games on a medium basis, 45% play games published by Scopely. Based on that data, we can reasonably estimate that 0.94% of those mobile gamers are Transitionals in this age bracket (45 x 0.19 x 0.11).

D. Activision

  • Among those who play mobile games on a heavy basis, 43% play games published by Activision. Thus, it can be reasonably estimated that Transitionals in this age group account for 0.9% of those mobile gamers (43 x 0.19 x 0.11).
  • Among those who play mobile games on a medium basis, 48% play games published by Activision. From that data, we estimated that 1% of those mobile gamers are Transitionals in this age bracket (48 x 0.19 x 0.11).

E. Supercell

  • Among those who play mobile games on a heavy basis, 40% play games published by Supercell. Thus, it can be reasonably estimated that Transitionals in this age group account for 0.84% of those mobile gamers (40 x 0.19 x 0.11).
  • Among those who play mobile games on a medium basis, 51% play games published by Supercell. Based on that data, we can estimate that 1.07% of those mobile gamers are Transitionals in this age bracket (51 x 0.19 x 0.11).

F. Nintendo

  • Among those who play mobile games on a heavy basis, 32% play games published by Nintendo. Thus, it can be reasonably estimated that Transitionals in this age group account for 0.67% of those mobile gamers (32 x 0.19 x 0.11).
  • Among those who play mobile games on a medium basis, 51% play games published by Nintendo. From that data, we can estimate that 1.07% of those mobile gamers are Transitionals in this age group (51 x 0.19 x 0.11).

WAYS TO REACH

  • Over half (54%) of mobile gamers "discover new mobile games on the Facebook family of apps." We can reasonably estimate from that data that 1.13% of those mobile gamers are Transitionals in this age group (54 x 0.19 x 0.11).
  • Over two-thirds (67%) of paying mobile gamers "discover new mobile games on the Facebook family of apps." Thus, we can estimate that 1.4% of those mobile gamers are Transitionals in this age group (67 x 0.19 x 0.11).
  • Just over one-fourth (27%) of mobile gamers "are influenced by the ability to play with friends when deciding which mobile game to try." Based on that data, we can reasonably estimate that Transitionals in this age bracket account for 0.56% of those mobile gamers (27 x 0.19 x 0.11).
  • More than one-third (39%) of paying mobile gamers "are influenced by the ability to play with friends when deciding which mobile game to try." From that information, we can estimate that 0.82% of those mobile gamers are Transitionals in this age group (39 x 0.19 x 0.11).
  • Nearly three-fourths (74%) of high-paying mobile gamers "discover new mobile games on the Facebook family of apps." We can reasonably estimate from that data that 1.55% of those mobile gamers are Transitionals in this age group (74 x 0.19 x 0.11).
  • Almost half (48%) of high-paying mobile gamers "are influenced by the ability to play with friends when deciding which mobile game to try." Thus, we can estimate that Transitionals in this age bracket account for 1% of those mobile gamers (48 x 0.19 x 0.11).

PAIN POINTS IN GAMING

  • A survey of U.S. gamers found that "the most frustrating part of downloading video games" is download time, as 39.4% cited that as their top frustration. Based on that data, it's reasonable to estimate that 0.82% of those gamers are Transitionals in this age group (39.4 x 0.19 x 0.11).
  • That same survey found that the second-most-commonly-cited frustration with video game downloads is downloads not working, as 25.5% of gamers said that is their top frustration. We estimate that Transitionals in this age group account for 0.53% of these gamers (25.5 x 0.19 x 0.11).
  • The survey also revealed that the third-most-commonly-cited frustration with video game downloads is an interruption that occurs during the download process, which thus requires re-starting the download, as 17.6% of gamers cited that as their top frustration. Thus, we can estimate that 0.37% of those gamers are Transitionals in this age bracket (17.6 x 0.19 x 0.11).
  • Among mobile gamers, 84% "have experienced one or more friction points" during the discovery phase. We can reasonably estimate that 1.76% of those mobile gamers are Transitionals in this age group (84 x 0.19 x 0.11).
  • Among mobile gamers, 90% "have experienced one or more friction points" during the installation phase. Based on that data, we estimated that Transitionals in this age bracket account for 1.88% of those mobile gamers (90 x 0.19 x 0.11).
  • Among mobile gamers, 96% "have experienced one or more friction points" during the post-installation phase. We can reasonably estimate from that data that 2.01% of those mobile gamers are Transitionals in this age group (96 x 0.19 x 0.11).
  • Over half (56%) of mobile gamers "stopped playing a mobile game after one time because it wasn't entertaining." From that information, we can estimate that 1.17% of those mobile gamers are Transitionals in this age group (56 x 0.19 x 0.11).

Research Strategy

To build this profile, data was collated from sources like the EEDAR Gamer Segmentation Report, the Facebook Insights Tool, research from Facebook Gaming marketing reports, and additional highlights from media and market research findings. Please note that when using the Facebook Insights tool to provide the presented psychographic data, the following segments were chosen based upon assumptions from the corresponding demographic profile: Ages 35-45 and interest choices of board games, browser games, card games, casino games, and online games.

A lot of our data is focused on mobile gamers because Transitionals are defined as "invested adult gamers whose stage of life means shifting from HD-centric gaming to more flexible mobile gaming." However, since Transitionals are in flux between HD and mobile gaming, they still play PC and console games, though likely on a less-frequent basis. For that reason, we also included some data about PC and console gamers as it relates to Transitionals. Some data points apply to multiple segments of the profiles within this project. For all calculations that resulted in values with decimal points, those resulting values were rounded to the nearest hundredth.
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Incidental Players (60+) - Demographics

The average incidental player over the age of 60 is either female or male and prefers to play on his/her smartphone. They are most likely college-educated, married, and have children. Females are more likely to make an in-game purchase than their male counterpart.

GENERAL STATISTICS THAT AFFECT THIS DEMOGRAPHIC

  • PC gaming is experiencing a decline. (66% in 2015, and 48% in 2018). This is related to overall PC ownership declining.
  • Tablets are also experiencing a decline. (2015- 35%, and 2018- 25%). This is also related to overall tablet ownership declining.
  • Mobile users are the most diverse and largest gaming group. In 2019, there are 209.5 million mobile users.
  • If the mobile usage rate is taken into consideration with the fact that this is a large age demographic, it could be inferred that incidental players in this age group, coupled with the other age groups make incidental players one of the best demographics to market to.
  • The most common time for this age group to play is 6-10 pm.
  • 85% of this age group do not consider themselves gamers.

INCIDENTAL PLAYERS

  • Incidental players make up 26% of all gamers. These people are nongamers who play mobile games because they are convenient and provide another way to use their device.
  • 65% of the US population (329,064,917) are gamers, therefore, 213,892,196 are gamers. Using this calculation, we can safely say that 55,611,970 people in the US are incidental players.
  • This can be broken down further by the age demographic. 26% of all people over the age of 50 play games. Therefore, we can assume that 6.76% of all people over the age of are incidental players (26*.26=6.76%).

SEX

  • 11.96% of gamers are incidental female players, and 14.04% are incidental male players since 46% of gamers are female, and 54% are male. (46*.26=11.96%, and 54*.26=14.04%)
  • 47% of men state they often or sometimes play games.
  • 40% of women state they often or sometimes play games.
  • Men state they mostly play for competition (14.1%), destruction (11.9%), completion (10.2%), and fantasy (9.0%).
  • Women state they mostly play for completion (17%), fantasy (16.2%), design (14.5%), and community (9.5%).
  • 60% of females play daily and 47% of males do.

INCOME