2020 Dem Candidates

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2020 Dem Candidates 3

In this next installment, we include the stances of Marianne Williamson, Jay Inslee, Amy Klobuchar, and Beto O'Rourke, four more Democrat candidates for the 2020 US Presidential election. All four of these candidates favor raising the Federal minimum wage to $15 per hour, and all four have spoken in favor of some form of national healthcare, though not necessarily the Medicare For All proposal. All but Amy Klobuchar support the Green New Deal, and her criticism seems mainly to be that the legislation over-promises. Only Klobuchar has spoken out against the so-called "tip credit," and despite a general support of unions among all the candidates, none has yet openly supported the Protecting Workers' Freedom to Organize Act.
The above information has been entered into the project spreadsheet as requested. Below is a deep dive into each candidate's positions.

SOME NOTES ON OUR METHODOLOGY

Our research strategy for each candidate followed a similar pattern. We began our research by comparing a list of the 2020 Presidential candidates from the New York Times to our previous work and selecting four candidates which have not yet been covered.
Our next step was to determine what position, if any, the candidates in question had taken on the relevant issues. OnTheIssues became our first stop in getting a general sense of each candidate. (We also considered Ballotpedia, but found that it did not provide as much insight as OnTheIssues.) Our next step was to locate each candidate's personal sites to see what they themselves have said about the issues. From there, we sought interviews with or op-ed pieces and/or tweets by the respective candidates which would shed light on their positions.
In several cases, the candidates have not taken a direct stance on the issue in question or else have taken a more nuanced stance than a simple yes or no. In such cases, we have marked on the project spreadsheet that the reader should refer to this write-up for the full picture.
Note that there is no legislation called "Protect the Right to Organize" before Congress. We understand this column to refer to bill S.664 - Protecting Workers' Freedom to Organize Act, introduced by Senator Sherrod Brown (D-OH) on March 5, 2019.

MARIANNE WILLIAMSOn

Williamson's signature issue has been the payment of reparations to the descendants of America's Black African slaves, but she's been far from silent on the other issues at hand, coming out in favor of a $15/hour minimum wage and universal healthcare, stating on her Marianne2020 site that "there are studies showing we would spend less money on a universal medicare-for-all system than we do now." However, she is not a cosponsor of the Protecting Workers' Freedom to Organize Act, and has not yet made a public statement in favor or against the proposed legislation. In addition, she has not referred to the so-called "tip credit" in any of her public statements or writings, so her stance on this subject is unknown.

JAY INSLEE

Inslee's signature issue has been the environment and pushing towards "a zero-carbon energy system," and he has openly praised the Green New Deal. He is also a major proponent of raising the minimum wage to $15, even tweeting, "But I thought the $15 minimum wage was going to crush Seattle's economy?" after Forbes declared Seattle one of the best places for both businesses and careers. Regarding "Medicare for all," Inslee has not made a direct public statement either way. However, in early 2019 he "introduced a bill in the Washington state legislature that would create a public option health care plan, which he has said is a step to achieving 'universal health care.'" We, therefore, understand him to be in favor.

Inslee is not a cosponsor of the Protecting Workers' Freedom to Organize Act, and has not yet made a public statement in favor or against the proposed legislation. However, he has constantly supported similar protections for workers and unions in his home state of Washington, and so we deem it likely that he would ultimately support the act. On the other hand, he has not made any public statements directly for or against the so-called "tip credit," and so we cannot determine his stance in that regard.

AMY KLOBUCHAR

Klobuchar is an avid promoter of hiking the minimum wage, recently tweeting, "There’s no question about it — the federal minimum wage must be increased to $15 an hour." And while she has not spoken on the issue recently, she has called for the elimination of the tip credit on a national level since at least 2007, noting that her home state of Minnesota had already done so.

On the other hand, Klobuchar "has refused to explicitly support Medicare for All," saying that it is perhaps something to look to for the future, but that she would rather have incremental action taken more immediately. She also rejects the Green New Deal, calling it "aspirational" but warning against over-promising and has not commented on the Protecting Workers' Freedom to Organize Act. On the other hand, she was in favor of allowing Senate cafeteria workers to organize a union of their own, and so we hypothesize would not be opposed to the Act.

BETO O'ROURKE

Beto O'Rourke is an avid supporter of the Green New Deal, calling it "the best proposal" he's seen contending with climate change and claiming to be "excited" about the legislation. He is also in favor of raising the minimum wage to $15/hour. However, despite his penchant for campaigning inside restaurants (and standing on the counters to let the crow see him), he has not made any statements about the tip credit one way or another.

O'Rourke has explicitly backed universal health care, but rather than a Medicare For All, he prefers the option called Medicare for America, which "would allow Americans to join a public Medicare-based plan, while preserving the option to remain on employer-based insurance." He is not a cosponsor of the Protecting Workers' Freedom to Organize Act, nor explicitly backed it. However, he stated in a recent interview, "I’m a big believer in labor’s right to collectively bargain in the private sector," though adding, "The public sector is a completely different situation." Which is to say that he may become a backer, but at the present time his position is unknown.

CONCLUSION

A brief summary of these candidates' positions has been entered into the project spreadsheet as requested, but in many cases they are more nuanced than space there would allow. For example, while O'Rourke is not in favor of Medicare For All, he is in favor of a very similar plan, albeit with more consumer choice, so simply listing his position as "no" could be seen as distorting his position. For this reason, we advise including this write-up along with the spreadsheet to any individual using it to understand the 2020 Democratic Presidential candidates and where they stand.
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2020 Dem Candidates 2

All four candidates listed below are for increasing the minimum wage, but have various views on other political topics discussed. The complete details of the research have been organized and summarized in the attached spreadsheet and described below.

JULIAN CASTRO

Julian Castro announced that he wished to raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour when he announced his bid to run for president in January 2019. He stated, "We need to raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour." Castro also stated that he "isn't just talking the talk he is walking the walk" and is paying his campaign interns $15 an hour.

Castro is also for Medicare for All and stated that the United States should be the "healthiest nation." He also stated, "There is no reason, as many folks have pointed out, that in the richest nation on earth, anybody should go without health care."

He is also in favor of the "Green New Deal" and stated "As President, my first executive order will recommit the United States to the Paris climate accord. We’re gonna say no to subsidizing big oil and say yes to passing a Green New Deal."

John Delaney

John Delaney supports raising the minimum wage to $15, but does not support Medicare for All or the Green New Deal. In an interview with NBC, he stated that he supports universal healthcare, but does not support medicaid for all.

John Delaney (D) said in a statement that he supports "the energy behind the Green New Deal," but not the resolution itself.

Delaney publicly stated, "I prefer a more specific, actionable plan to do something big on climate, like the bipartisan carbon tax dividend bill I lead, we can't turn climate into a political issue, we need to do something big as soon as possible."

John Hickenlooper

John Hickenlooper supports raising the minimum wage to $15. He stated that he would "eventually like to see the United States have universal healthcare." However, he does not support Medicare for All.

Although he supports the need for government involvement in climate change, he does not support the New Green Deal, stating that it has "unachievable goals." He also stated that "in addition to technological barriers, the Ocasio-Cortez-Markey resolution sets the Green New Deal up for failure by shifting away from private decision-making and toward the public sector — including multiple provisions with little connection to reducing greenhouse gas emissions,"

Bernie Sanders

Bernie Sanders is for increasing the minimum wage to $15 an hour and it was a major cause of his 2016 campaign. He stated that currently minimum wage is a "starvation raise" and he has called on employers such as Amazon and McDonald's to voluntarily increase it. Sanders publicly stated, If you work 40 hours a week, you should not live in poverty."

Sanders also supports Medicare for All and hopes to "replace private insurance with single payer healthcare." He stated, "that over a 4-year period, we're going to transform our health care system" and that healthcare is a right, not a human privilege."

Bernie Sanders is known as "the Godfather" of the New Green Deal and it will be the "centerpiece of his 2020 platform."

ELIMINATION OF TIP CREDIT

None of the democratic candidates covered in this report, except for Bernie Sanders have spoken publicly concerning their support or lack thereof for eliminating the tip credit for tipped employees such as servers.

In attempting to locate any quotes, overviews, or other information concerning the candidates' support or lack thereof, we referred to each individual's website to see whether they had made any official statements on the subject in regard to their bids for the White House. We focused primarily on each candidate's About and Issues pages, with a particular focus on links and pages focused on economic topics; however, we ultimately reviewed the entirety of each of their website for information. In following with this, we also reviewed each candidate's social media profiles on sites such as Facebook and Twitter to confirm whether they'd shared any posts on the topic. When this did not reveal any information, we turned our focus to news articles and websites focused on politics and the 2020 presidential election, in the hopes that one of the candidate would have referenced the topic in a speech or other event, or that someone would have reported on their opinions. While this method provided us with detailed information about each candidate's primary issues and political stances, the subject of tip credits was not covered with reference to any of the specific candidates covered in this report. Finally, we turned to government websites and reports learning whether any of the candidate had supported or introduced any measures concerning the topic of the tip credit in their current and/or former political positions, such as in the senate or as mayor. However, this also provided no information specific to any of the candidates covered here.


PROTECT WORKERS' FREEDOM TO ORGANIZE ACT


No information could be found concerning their support or lack thereof for the Protect Workers' Freedom to Organize Act. This is likely because the Act was only introduced last month. However, in attempting to locate any quotes, overviews, or other information concerning the candidates' opinions on this subject, we referred to each individual's website to see whether they had made any official statements on the subject with regard to their bids for the White House. We focused primarily on each candidate's About and Issues pages; however, we ultimately reviewed the entirety of each of their website for information. In following with this, we also reviewed each candidate's social media profiles on sites such as Facebook and Twitter to confirm whether they'd shared any posts on the topic. When this did not reveal any information, we turned our focus to news articles and websites focused on politics and the 2020 presidential election, in the hopes that one of the candidate would have referenced the topic in a speech or other event, or that someone would have reported on their opinions. While this method provided us with detailed information about each candidate's primary issues and political stances, the subject of tip credits was not covered with reference to any of the specific candidates covered in this report. Finally, we turned to government websites such as the Act's official page on Congress' website to learn whether any of the candidates had supported spoken about the topic in any capacity aside from co-sponsorship. However, this also provided no information specific to any of the candidates covered here.


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2020 Dem Candidates 1

Seven democrats who have announced their candidacy for the 2020 presidential election in the United States are Kirsten Gillibrand, Kamala Harris, Elizabeth Warren, Pete Buttigieg, Andrew Yang, Tulsi Gabbard, and Cory Booker. Columns A through G, Rows 2 through 8 of the attached spreadsheet have been completed for each candidate and each issue, with a simple "yes," "no," or "unknown" to indicate each individual's stance on the given topics. Further details about each, including statements made by each candidate, have been provided below.

$15 minimum wage

  • Kirsten Gillibrand
In 2017, Kirsten Gillibrand was one of 22 democratic senators to support Bernie Sanders' proposed bill which would raise the federal minimum wage to $15 per hour. Additionally, her 2020 presidential campaign website identifies raising the minimum wage to $15 per hour as one of her primary issues, saying "we need to raise the minimum wage to $15 nationwide and lift millions of families out of poverty." In her keynote speech at the 2018 High Wage America Summit, Gillibrand reiterated this opinion, saying "I do believe the minimum wage should be $15 dollars an hour and it should be clocked to inflation. It should actually be indexed." Senator Gillibrand has further identified the issue as one of her top concerns in regard to income inequality specifically, listing it along with paid leave and equal pay in a tweet dated May 16, 2017.

  • Kamala Harris
Kamala Harris was one of 22 democratic senators to support Bernie Sanders' 2017 bill to raise the federal minimum wage to $15 per hour. Harris has also tweeted in support of the measure, saying "the federal minimum wage is too low to support a family. That’s why I’ve supported raising the minimum wage to $15 an hour" in August 2017. At a town hall event this past January, Harris didn't explicitly recommend a $15 minimum wage, but did indicate that the minimum wage as it currently exists is too low. "In 99 percent of the counties in America, if you are a minimum wage worker working full time you cannot afford market rate for a one-bedroom apartment."

  • Elizabeth Warren
Eliabeth Warren was also one of 22 democratic senators to voice her support of Bernie Sanders' 2017 bill to raise the federal minimum wage to $15 per hour. During her bid for the presidency, Warren has indicated that the minimum wage should be able to support a family of three, something which she says it currently fails to do at $7.25 per hour, and saying that when she was a child the minimum wage was able to keep her family out of poverty. Aside from her support of Sanders' bill though, Warren has not identified a specific amount to which she believes the minimum wage should be raised.

  • Pete Buttigieg
While Buttigieg worked to increase the city-wide minimum wage while serving as the mayor of South Bend, Indiana, accelerating his plan to increase from $7.25 to $10.10 per hour by 2018 and accomplishing this goal by 2017 instead, he has not spoken explicitly about the federal minimum wage.

  • Andrew Yang
While Andrew Yang does support a minimum income threshold, it's one for all Americans rather than a specific minimum wage increase. In his bid for the presidency, Yang's primary issue is that of a Universal Basic Income (UBI), which he believes should be $1,000 per month for every American. His reasoning is that, with increasing technologies focused on artificial intelligence and machine learning, many Americans may soon be losing their jobs to automation. "If you imagine this population losing their jobs over the next five to 10 years, then you have to be realistic about what the next steps are. Some liberals imagine that we might be able to retrain hundreds of thousands of truckers as software engineers or some other occupation. But the reality is that federally funded retraining programs have an effectiveness rate of between zero and 15% when applied to manufacturing workers, and fewer than 10% of workers qualify for retraining programs as are currently offered anyway."

  • Tulsi Gabbard
In 2017, Tulsi Gabbard supported Bernie Sanders' Raise the Wage Act, which proposed a minimum wage increase to $15 per hour. (source 22-23) She has tweeted about the topic several times, as far back as 2016. On February 13, 2019, she wrote "last week, New Jersey became the latest state to sign a $15 minimum wage bill into law. Let’s keep up the momentum! No one should have to work two jobs just to pay rent and put food on the table." As part of her campaign for the presidency, Gabbard has repeatedly voiced her support of a $15 per hour minimum wage.

  • Cory Booker
Cory Booker was one of 22 democratic senators to back Bernie Sanders' Raise the Wage Act in 2017. He has continued his support of an increased minimum wage since then, saying "you cannot live and raise a family on $22,000 a year. You can't afford housing, you can't afford child care and since your company isn't helping you with retirement, you can't save for retirement." This past February, he tweeted in praise of Governor Murphy's recent move to increase New Jersey's statewide minimum wage to $15 per hour, saying that the rest of the country should follow suit.

elimination of TIP credit

None of the democratic candidates covered in this report have spoken publicly concerning their support or lack thereof for eliminating the tip credit for tipped employees such as servers.

In attempting to locate any quotes, overviews, or other information concerning the candidates' support or lack thereof, we referred to each individual's website to see whether they had made any official statements on the subject in regard to their bids for the White House. We focused primarily on each candidate's About and Issues pages, with a particular focus on links and pages focused on economic topics; however, we ultimately reviewed the entirety of each of their website for information. In following with this, we also reviewed each candidate's social media profiles on sites such as Facebook and Twitter to confirm whether they'd shared any posts on the topic. When this did not reveal any information, we turned our focus to news articles and websites focused on politics and the 2020 presidential election, in the hopes that one of the candidate would have referenced the topic in a speech or other event, or that someone would have reported on their opinions. While this method provided us with detailed information about each candidate's primary issues and political stances, the subject of tip credits was not covered with reference to any of the specific candidates covered in this report. Finally, we turned to government websites and reports to learn whether any of the candidate had supported or introduced any measures concerning the topic of the tip credit in their current and/or former political positions, such as in the senate or as mayor. However, this also provided no information specific to any of the candidates covered here.

Medicare for all

  • Kirsten Gillibrand
  • Kirsten Gillibrand indicates on her website that Medicare for All is one of her primary concerns going into the 2020 election, writing that "we need Medicare for All to make high-quality, universal, affordable health care a reality for everyone." When announcing her exploratory committee, Gillibrand said that "health care should be a right and not a privilege." In 2017, she co-sponsored the Medicare for All Act of 2017 introduced by Bernie Sanders. She has supported the subject since her first run for Congress in 2006.

  • Kamala Harris
  • One of the measures Harris has supported while serving as senator has been in support of Medicare for All That said, Harris has been clear that, if she can't get that, she'd settle for eliminating private health insurance altogether. (source 33-34) Specifically, in an interview with Jake Tapper on the subject of health insurance, she said "that she’d “eliminate all of that,” where “that” referred to private insurance."

  • Elizabeth Warren
  • While she has always been supportive of Medicare for All, Elizabeth Warren's official plans call for making "insurance within the existing Obamacare system more affordable and protect more enrollees from insurance company policy changes and premium hikes." Her plan, called the Consumer Health Insurance Protection Act, does not call for a single-payor system like traditional Medicare for All plans.

  • Pete Buttigieg
  • Pete Buttigieg has been supportive of Medicare for All, assuaging concerns that such a system would eliminate private health insurance. On the subject, he has said that "single-payer health care system is 'the right place for us to head as a country'. In interviews, Buttigieg has said that his goal is simply to make health insurance available to everyone, rather than to require that all Americans receive the same program or that private insurance be eliminated. "The bottom line is, we need to make sure that every American is able to get health care."

  • Andrew Yang
  • Medicare for All is one of the primary policy issues discussed on Andrew Yang's campaign website. Specifically, he writes that "access to quality healthcare is one of the most important factors in overall well being, and yet America is one of the few industrialized nations not to provide healthcare for all of its citizens." That said, his website suggests that Yang is open to alternative plans for ensuring that all Americans receive health coverage, writing "either through expanding Medicare to all, or through creating a new healthcare system, we must move in the direction of a public option to ensure that all Americans can receive the healthcare they deserve." Publicly with regard to the election, he has advocated for a single-payor system.

  • Tulsi Gabbard
  • While her 2020 campaign website does not reference the subject, Tulsi Gabbard's website from her campaign for state representative indicates that "Medicare for all is the solution we need." In 2017, she co-sponsored the Medicare for All proposal in the House. Currently, she serves on the Medicare for All Caucus, and believes that "we pay far more in this country on healthcare costs than any other country in the world and get worse results. Far too many Americans in this country are sick and unable to get the care they need."

  • Cory Booker
  • Cory Booker has indicated on his 2020 campaign website that he supports Medicare for All; however, his recent discussions on the subject have left voters unsure where he stands. Specifically, when asked about the subject, Booker has indicated that he would not do away with private health insurance, saying "even countries that have vast access to publicly offered health care still have private health care, so no [I would not].” That said, he did sign Sanders' Medicare for All bill in 2017.

    protect WORKERS' FREEDOM TO ORGANIZE ACT

  • Kirsten Gillibrand
  • Kirsten Gillibrand is a co-sponsor of the Protect Workers' Freedom to Organize Act, which was introduced on March 5, 2019. Likely because it was introduced so recently, no other information exists concerning Gillibrand's support of the Act.

  • Cory Booker
  • Cory Booker is a co-sponsor of the Protect Workers' Freedom to Organize Act, which was introduced on March 5, 2019. Likely because it was introduced so recently, no other information exists concerning Booker's support of the Act.

    For the other five candidates covered in this report - Kamala Harris, Elizabeth Warren, Pete Buttigieg, Andrew Yang, and Tulsi Gabbard - no information could be found concerning their support or lack thereof for the Protect Workers' Freedom to Organize Act. This is likely because the Act was only introduced last month. However, in attempting to locate any quotes, overviews, or other information concerning the candidates' opinions on this subject, we referred to each individual's website to see whether they had made any official statements on the subject with regard to their bids for the White House. We focused primarily on each candidate's About and Issues pages; however, we ultimately reviewed the entirety of each of their website for information. In following with this, we also reviewed each candidate's social media profiles on sites such as Facebook and Twitter to confirm whether they'd shared any posts on the topic. When this did not reveal any information, we turned our focus to news articles and websites focused on politics and the 2020 presidential election, in the hopes that one of the candidate would have referenced the topic in a speech or other event, or that someone would have reported on their opinions. While this method provided us with detailed information about each candidate's primary issues and political stances, the subject of tip credits was not covered with reference to any of the specific candidates covered in this report. Finally, we turned to government websites such as the Act's official page on Congress' website to learn whether any of the candidates had supported spoken about the topic in any capacity aside from co-sponsorship. However, this also provided no information specific to any of the candidates covered here.

    green new deal

  • Kirsten Gillibrand
  • While Kirsten Gillibrand has not officially co-sponsored Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez' February 7, 2019 bill, "Recognizing the duty of the Federal Government to create a Green New Deal," she has voiced her support of the Green New Deal publicly. In January of this year, she tweeted in support of the Green New Deal, writing that "Climate change is an immediate and catastrophic threat to our future. And yes, it's real....We need a #GreenNewDeal, and we need it now."

  • Kamala Harris
  • Kamala Harris has not co-sponsored Alexendria Ocasio-Cortez' February 7, 2019 bill, "Recognizing the duty of the Federal Government to create a Green New Deal;" however, she "is a supporter and original co-sponsor of the original Green New Deal resolution offered by U.S. Senator Ed Markey." On the subject, she has said that "climate change is an existential threat, and confronting it requires bold action."

  • Elizabeth Warren
  • While Elizabeth Warren was initially unclear in her support of the Green New Deal and has not signed Alexandria Occasio-Cortez' February 7, 2019 bill on the topic, she has since come out in full support of the plan. Specifically, she said that "Climate change is real, it threatens all of us, & we have no time to waste to address it head-on." She has further indicated that revenue from her proposed "ultra-millionaire tax" could help to support a Green New Deal.

  • Pete Buttigieg
  • Pete Buttigieg recently came out in support of the Green New Deal, saying that while it's not a full plan yet and is instead a framework, it is "the right beginning" for handling concerns about climate change. He has further said that, as the mayor of South Bend, Indiana, he has personally witnessed the impact climate change is having and "the idea that we need to race toward that goal and that we should do it in a way that enhances the economic justice and the level of economic opportunity in our country, I believe that's exactly the right direction to be going in."

  • Andrew Yang
  • Andrew Yang has tweeted his support of the Green New Deal in response to a follower asking him "what is your position on the Green New Deal, Andrew." However, he has provided no other public support or quotes concerning the Green New Deal.

  • Tulsi Gabbard
  • Tulsi Gabbard has refused to publicly support the Green New Deal, saying that she has "some concerns with the Green New Deal, and about some of the vagueness of the language in there, so I have not co-sponsored that resolution." That said, she has previously voiced support for measures to handle climate change. In fact, prior to the official release of the bill, she said "I am proud to stand here together with our friends, our allies, our colleagues, to fight for a green energy economy, the [Off Fossil Fuels] Act, other legislation that is there and a Green New Deal."

  • Cory Booker
  • Cory Booker joined Alexandria Occasio-Cortez and Ed Markley in introducing the Green New Deal earlier this year in the hopes that it "would create millions of good, high-wage jobs in the United States, provide unprecedented levels of prosperity and economic security for Americans, support family farmers, and counteract systemic injustices – all while addressing the existential challenge of climate change." He has further indicated that the plan would not be "prohibatively expensive", saying that suggestions it is are lies.
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    2020 Dem Candidates 4

    Three additional democrats who have announced their candidacy for the 2020 presidential election in the United States are Wayne Messam, Seth Moulton, and Tim Ryan. Columns A through G, Rows 17 through 19 of the attached spreadsheet have been completed for each candidate and each issue, with a simple "yes," "no," or "unknown" to indicate each individual's stance on the given topics. Further details about each, including statements made by each candidate, have been provided below.

    $15 minimum wage

    • Wayne Messam
    It's unclear whether Wayne Messam supports a $15 per hour minimum wage. While his website references his efforts to ensure a "living wage" for city workers in Miramar, Florida, where he is the mayor, he has been unclear concerning his opinion on a federal minimum wage increase to $15 per hour. When asked about the subject, he has simply pointed back to his efforts in Miramar, saying "mayors are closest to the American people and understand the day to day issues our communities face... That’s why I helped pass a living wage for city workers."

    • Seth Moulton
    In the past, Seth Moulton has been supportive of increasing the federal minimum wage to $12 per hour by 2020, and was a co-sponsor of H.R.2150, the Raise the Wage Act. Since declaring his candidacy for the 2020 presidential election though, Moulton has increased his minimum wage goal to $15 per hour. In January of this year, he "signed on...to sponsor a bill to incrementally raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour over five years."

    • Tim Ryan
    Unlike many other democratic candidates for president, Tim Ryan supports a federal minimum wage higher than $15 per hour, saying "when they hear a political party talk about fighting for 15 bucks an hour, we are not speaking to their aspiration. We are not speaking to what they want their lives to be like, not where they are. Our politics are stuck. We need to jump ourselves out of this." That said, he writes on his government website that he does support a $15 per hour minimum wage, writing "I support raising the minimum wage to $15.00 an hour. It can be very difficult to raise a family in this economy, and hardworking Americans deserve to be properly compensated. This bill is a step in the right direction."

    elimination of the tip credit

    None of the democratic candidates covered in this report have spoken publicly concerning their support or lack thereof for eliminating the tip credit for tipped employees such as servers.

    In attempting to locate any quotes, overviews, or other information concerning the candidates' support or lack thereof, we referred to each individual's website to see whether they had made any official statements on the subject in regard to their bids for the White House. We focused primarily on each candidate's About and Issues pages, with a particular focus on links and pages focused on economic topics; however, we ultimately reviewed the entirety of each of their website for information. In following with this, we also reviewed each candidate's social media profiles on sites such as Facebook and Twitter to confirm whether they'd shared any posts on the topic. When this did not reveal any information, we turned our focus to news articles and websites focused on politics and the 2020 presidential election, in the hopes that one of the candidate would have referenced the topic in a speech or other event, or that someone would have reported on their opinions. While this method provided us with detailed information about each candidate's primary issues and political stances, the subject of tip credits was not covered with reference to any of the specific candidates covered in this report. Finally, we turned to government websites and reports to learn whether any of the candidates had supported or introduced any measures concerning the topic of the tip credit in their current and/or former political positions, such as in the senate or as mayor. However, this also provided no information specific to any of the candidates covered here.

    Medicare for all

    • Wayne Messam
    Wayne Messam is supportive of Medicare for All, saying that it "seems to be the simplest reform idea that makes sense." That said, his opinions on this subject are somewhat elusive beyond that quote. While his website lists healthcare as one of his top policy concerns, the associated page does not provide any specific detail on the subject. He writes "access to quality healthcare is one of the top barriers to economic opportunity, mobility and stability. If people are unable to live healthy lives, their productivity and ability to thrive at school, work or home suffers. In order to compete globally and lay the groundwork for a truly prosperous society, we must re-evaluate our priorities and make healthcare a fundamental right."

    • Seth Moulton
    While Seth Moulton has indicated that more affordable healthcare is a top priority of his and has said that "healthcare is a right, not a privilege", he is not supportive of Medicare for All. "Moulton said he believes every American should have access to affordable health care, but that a single-payer system is “not perfect.” He cited his issues with the VA’s government-run health-care system as part of the reason why he does not support a sweeping public health-care option." Instead, he says he'd be supportive of a system which gives all Americans access to and a choice between both public and private healthcare.

    • Tim Ryan
    Tim Ryan was a member of the democratic Medicare for All Caucus and, according to a tweet he shared in July of 2018, he has "supported Medicare For All for over a decade and know this is the right direction for our country to get every American the health care they need. He is a co-sponsor of H.R.676 - Expanded & Improved Medicare For All Act, which was introduced in 2017.

    The green new deal

    • Wayne Messam
    Wayne Messam has indicated that he is supportive of the Green New Deal, calling statistics concerning climate change "alarming." On the Green New Deal specifically, he has said "I think right now there's a lot of talk about climate change obviously with [the Green New Deal] that was sent down in Washington. I support the urgency, and the end goal of that proposal."

    • Seth Moulton
    Seth Moulton is a member of the Climate Solutions Caucus and has publicly announced his support of the Green New Deal. On the subject, he said "I am proud to announce my support for the Green New Deal. No issue is more important today for our children and our grandchildren than addressing climate change. And if we do so successfully, our nation will be stronger, our economy will be stronger, our communities will be more resilient, and the futures of our children and grandchildren will be much brighter."

    • Tim Ryan
    Tim Ryan has been unsupportive of the Green New Deal, saying that while he believes climate change is a topic of concern, he doesn't believe that democrats should "[appear] unfriendly to the private sector." He has further stated that "we can’t green the economy without the power of the free market," something which he believes the Green New Deal would pose a risk to.

    protecting workers' freedom to organize bill

    For the three candidates covered in this report, no information could be found concerning their support or lack thereof for the Protect Workers' Freedom to Organize Act. This is likely because the Act was only introduced last month. However, in attempting to locate any quotes, overviews, or other information concerning the candidates' opinions on this subject, we referred to each individual's website to see whether they had made any official statements on the subject with regard to their bids for the White House. We focused primarily on each candidate's About and Issues pages; however, we ultimately reviewed the entirety of each of their website for information. In following with this, we also reviewed each candidate's social media profiles on sites such as Facebook and Twitter to confirm whether they'd shared any posts on the topic. When this did not reveal any information, we turned our focus to news articles and websites focused on politics and the 2020 presidential election, in the hopes that one of the candidate would have referenced the topic in a speech or other event, or that someone would have reported on their opinions. While this method provided us with detailed information about each candidate's primary issues and political stances, the subject of tip credits was not covered with reference to any of the specific candidates covered in this report. Finally, we turned to government websites such as the Act's official page on Congress' website to learn whether any of the candidates had supported spoken about the topic in any capacity aside from co-sponsorship. However, this also provided no information specific to any of the candidates covered here.
    Part
    05
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    Part
    05

    2020 Dem Candidates 5

    There are only two remaining democratic candidates for the 2020 presidential election who have not been covered in previous responses: Eric Swalwell, and Mike Gravel. Columns A through G, Row 20 of the attached spreadsheet have been completed for each issue, with a simple "yes," "no," or "unknown" to indicate each candidate's stance on the given topics. Further details about each, including statements made by the candidates, have been provided below.

    methodology

    Neither candidate has spoken publicly concerning their support or lack thereof for eliminating the tax credit for workers such as servers, or for the Protecting Workers' Freedom to Organize bill. Additionally, and in general, Mike Gravel has spoken publicly about very few specific issues, as his campaign is not intended to win. Instead, he has indicated that his plan in running is to raise enough money to be a part of the debates, with the ultimate goal being "to bring attention to a wide variety of policy positions that they felt were not being discussed by the candidates currently running in the Democratic primary."

    In attempting to locate any quotes, overviews, or other information concerning the candidates' opinions on the subject marked "unavailable" on the spreadsheet, we referred to their campaign websites to see whether they had made any official statements on the subjects in regard to their bids for the White House. In following with this, we also reviewed their social media profiles on sites such as Facebook and Twitter to confirm whether they'd shared any posts on the topic. When this did not reveal any information, we turned our focus to news articles and websites focused on politics and the 2020 presidential election, in the hopes that Swalwell or Gravel would have referenced the topic in a speech or other event, or that someone would have reported on their opinion(s). While this method provided us with detailed information about their primary issues and political stances, the subject of tip credits and/or the Protecting Workers' Freedom to Organize bill was not covered with reference to Eric Swalwell or Mike Gravel specifically. Finally, we turned to government websites and reports to learn whether they had supported or introduced any measures concerning the topic in their current and/or former political positions. However, this also provided no information specific to either candidate.

    $15 minimum wage

    • Eric Swalwell
    Eric Swalwell is supportive of raising the minimum wage to $15 per hour, and has co-sponsored H.R.15 Raise the Wage Act which was introduced in 2017. That said, the subject is not one which he has discussed in any detail and it is not addressed on his campaign website.

    • Mike Gravel
    It's unclear whether or not Mike Gravel is supportive of a minimum wage increase to $15 per hour, as he has not spoken publicly on the subject nor is it covered on his campaign website. As discussed in the methodology section above, this is likely because Gravel's campaign is not intended to win; instead, his goal is simply to get a seat on the debate stage and push the election further to the left. Because of this, he has not spoken with much specificity about any particular issue.

    Medicare for all

    • Eric Swalwell
    Eric Swalwell has been supportive of Medicare for All, calling it an "obvious solution to a health care system that still drives people to financial ruin." In an opinion pieced written by Swalwell and published by NBC News, he wrote that "we need a Medicare for All universal health guarantee. We need, and Americans deserve, a health care system in which if you get sick you get seen, as well as one in which if you get seen, you don’t go broke because of it." That said, he has been supportive of maintaining a system wherein Americans have a choice between public and/or private insurance options, saying that "he’s for allowing Americans to have a choice between private healthcare coverage and government-run health benefits."

    • Mike Gravel
    While Mike Gravel has not provided any specific detail or commentary on the subject of healthcare, he has indicated that he is supportive of Medicare for All. On the subject, he said "when people say, ‘We should have Medicare for All, education free for all,’ other people say, ‘Where’s the money?’ The money’s right there with the mother of boondoggles."

    green new deal

    • Eric Swalwell
    Eric Swalwell has said publicly that "he’s supportive of principles of the Green New Deal." However, the topic is not one that is addressed on his campaign website, and he has not discussed the topic with any specificity publicly. He has, however, co-sponsored H.Res.109, Recognizing the duty of the Federal Government to create a Green New Deal.

    • Mike Gravel
    While Mike Gravel has not spoken explictly concerning his support or lack thereof for the Green New Deal, it is like that he is supportive of it based on his campaign video. The advertisement shows "a list of present and former Democratic lawmakers, as well as the former CEO of Starbucks, Howard Schultz, making critical comments about various measures like the Green New Deal and Medicare for All." the lawmakers are presented in a negative light, suggesting that Gravel is supportive of the measures to which they are opposed.

    • Joe Biden
    $15 MINIMUM WAGE
    Joe Biden has been supportive of a raising the federal minimum wage to $15 per hour for several years, even in 2015 when the Obama White House was officially supporting a raise to $12 per hour. That said, he has not spoken on the topic officially with regard to the 2020 election specifically, likely because he has not yet officially announced his candidacy.

    ELIMINATION OF TIP CREDIT
    Joe Biden has not spoken publicly concerning his support or lack thereof for eliminating the tax credit for workers such as servers, for the Protecting Workers' Freedom to Organize bill, or for the Green New Deal. In attempting to locate any quotes, overviews, or other information concerning his opinions on the subjects, we referred to his campaign website to see whether they had made any official statements on the subjects in regard to their bids for the White House. Because Biden has not officially announced his candidacy though, he has not yet created a 2020 campaign website. As a result, we also reviewed his social media profiles on sites such as Facebook and Twitter to confirm whether he'd shared any posts on the topic. When this did not reveal any information, we turned our focus to news articles and websites focused on politics and the 2020 presidential election, in the hopes that Biden would have referenced the topic in a speech or other event, or that someone would have reported on his opinion(s). While this method provided us with detailed information about his primary issues and political stances, the subject of tip credits, the Protecting Workers' Freedom to Organize bill, and/or the Green New Deal was not covered. Finally, we turned to government websites and reports to learn whether he had supported or introduced any measures concerning the topic. However, this also provided no information specific to either candidate. It is possible that this information is unavailable due to the fact that Biden has not yet officially announced his candidacy for the 2020 presidential election.

    MEDICARE FOR ALL
    While Joe Biden has always been supportive of liberal healthcare policies, such as the Affordable Care Act, he has not officially indicated whether or not he supports Medicare for All. To date, he has neither supported nor voiced opposition to the idea.

    PROTECT WORKERS' FREEDOM TO ORGANIZE BILL
    Joe Biden has not spoken publicly concerning his support or lack thereof for eliminating the tax credit for workers such as servers, for the Protecting Workers' Freedom to Organize bill, or for the Green New Deal. In attempting to locate any quotes, overviews, or other information concerning his opinions on the subjects, we referred to his campaign website to see whether they had made any official statements on the subjects in regard to their bids for the White House. Because Biden has not officially announced his candidacy though, he has not yet created a 2020 campaign website. As a result, we also reviewed his social media profiles on sites such as Facebook and Twitter to confirm whether he'd shared any posts on the topic. When this did not reveal any information, we turned our focus to news articles and websites focused on politics and the 2020 presidential election, in the hopes that Biden would have referenced the topic in a speech or other event, or that someone would have reported on his opinion(s). While this method provided us with detailed information about his primary issues and political stances, the subject of tip credits, the Protecting Workers' Freedom to Organize bill, and/or the Green New Deal was not covered. Finally, we turned to government websites and reports to learn whether he had supported or introduced any measures concerning the topic. However, this also provided no information specific to either candidate. It is possible that this information is unavailable due to the fact that Biden has not yet officially announced his candidacy for the 2020 presidential election.

    GREEN NEW DEAL
    Joe Biden has not spoken publicly concerning his support or lack thereof for eliminating the tax credit for workers such as servers, for the Protecting Workers' Freedom to Organize bill, or for the Green New Deal. In attempting to locate any quotes, overviews, or other information concerning his opinions on the subjects, we referred to his campaign website to see whether they had made any official statements on the subjects in regard to their bids for the White House. Because Biden has not officially announced his candidacy though, he has not yet created a 2020 campaign website. As a result, we also reviewed his social media profiles on sites such as Facebook and Twitter to confirm whether he'd shared any posts on the topic. When this did not reveal any information, we turned our focus to news articles and websites focused on politics and the 2020 presidential election, in the hopes that Biden would have referenced the topic in a speech or other event, or that someone would have reported on his opinion(s). While this method provided us with detailed information about his primary issues and political stances, the subject of tip credits, the Protecting Workers' Freedom to Organize bill, and/or the Green New Deal was not covered. Finally, we turned to government websites and reports to learn whether he had supported or introduced any measures concerning the topic. However, this also provided no information specific to either candidate. It is possible that this information is unavailable due to the fact that Biden has not yet officially announced his candidacy for the 2020 presidential election.


    Sources
    Sources

    From Part 03
    From Part 04
    From Part 05